Master Gardener Coordinators Manual

OSU Extension Master Gardener™ Program Coordinators' Manual

Table of Contents

Introduction

Master Gardener Training

 

MASTER GARDENER VOLUNTEER ACTIVITIES

 

POLICIES AND PROCEDURES

Lettuce Grow Sustainable Gardening Classes

THE OREGON MASTER GARDENER ASSOCATION AND ITS CHAPTERS

List of Appendices
 

Appendix A.1. A copy of the publicity brochure EM8723.

Appendix A.2. Contract and Reimbursement Agreement.

Appendix B.1. Sample news release.

Appendix B.2. Sample Master Gardener Application.

Appendix B.3. Sample Interview Questions.

Appendix B.4. Sample Acceptance Letter.

Appendix B.5. Sample Rejection Letter.

Appendix B.11. List of Extension faculty and others who teach Master Gardener training classes.

Appendix B.12. Copy of the OSU Master Gardener Certificate of Completion.

Appendix B.14. Copy of Extension Educator Peer Evaluation.

Appendix B.15. Citizens Evaluation of Teaching (CET).

Appendix B.16. Copy of Recertification Exam.

Appendix B.17. Certificates of Recertification for Veteran Master Gardeners.

Appendix B.18. Re-Application/Transfer Form.

Appendix B.20. Report of Accident/Illness Form.

Appendix B.21. Master Gardener Agreement Template - Garden Project/Demo Garden.

Appendix C.1. Letter to Prospective Online Master Gardener Course Students.

Appendix C.2. Application for Online Master Gardener Course.

Appendix C.3. Sample Syllabus for Online Master Gardener Course Students.

Appendix D.1. Volunteer Log Sheet.

Appendix E.1.   OSU Master Gardener™ and OSU Extension Logos.

Appendix E.2. OSU Extension logo.

 

 
Many people contributed to this version of the OSU Extension Service Guide forCoordinating a County Master Gardener™ Program. 
 
Rosie Lerner, Community Horticulture Extension Specialist at Purdue University, and Marianne Riofrio, Extension Associate at Ohio State University, graciously made the Master Gardener coordinators’ handbooks used in their programs available to Oregon State University. These handbooks served as the foundation for this Service Guide.
 
Ann Marie VanDerZanden, former OSU statewide Master Gardener Coordinator, developed the first version of this Service Guide for OSU. Additional contributors include: Jan McNeilan (OSU Extension, retired), Ray McNeilan (OSU Extension, retired) and Linda McMahan (OSU Extension, Yamhill County). Patty Driscoll (Program Assistant, OSU Master Gardener Program) worked to revise this version of the Handbook and gathered updates of several of the documents in the Appendices. Gail Langellotto (OSU statewide Master Gardener Coordinator) edited and oversaw the revisions of this version of the OSU Extension Service Guide for Coordinating a County Master Gardener™ Program, with input and advice from Master Gardener personnel from across Oregon.
 
Reviews and editorial comments were provided by: Janice Cowan, Linda McMahan, Amy Jo Detweiler, Patty Driscoll.
 

Service Guide Versions

  • Version 1.0, November 2002  (Coordinated by Anne Marie VanDerZanden)
  • Version 2.0, November 2004 (Major revisions coordinated by Jan McNeilan)
  • Version 3.0, October 2010 (Major revisions coordinated by Gail Langellotto)
  • Version 4.0, July 2016 (Major revisions coordinated by Gail Langellotto)

 

County Master Gardener Programs

For the latest list of county Master Gardener Programs, please refer to the 'Local OSU Master Gardener Programs' page on the main OSU Extension Master Gardener site.
 

Counties without Master Gardener Programs

Gilliam County, 333 South Main Street, PO Box 707, Condon, OR 97823-0707,
Grant County, 530 E. Main Street Ste 10, John Day, OR 97845
Lake County, 103 South E Street, Lakeview OR 97630,
Malheur County, 710 SW 5th Ave, Ontario OR 97914,
Morrow County, 54173 Hwy 74 (PO Box 397), Heppner, OR  97836,
Sherman County, PO Box 385, 409 Hood Street, Moro 97039,
Wallowa County, 668 NW 1st Street in Enterprise, Oregon 97828,
Wheeler County, PO Box 407, Fossil, OR 97830-0407,

Statewide Master Gardener Program

Statewide Master Gardener Program Coordinator
4017 Ag and Life Sciences Building      
Corvallis, Oregon 97331-7304
Phone:
Fax: 541-737-3479
 
Extension Horticulture Office Specialist
4017 Ag and Life Sciences Building      
Corvallis, Oregon 97331-7304
Phone:  541-737-5480
Fax: 541-737-3479
 
 
Please submit all changes of personnel to:
 
Gail Langellotto        
4017 Ag and Life Sciences Building      
Corvallis, Oregon 97331-7304
Phone:
Fax: 541-737-3479
 

Foreword

 
This OSU Extension Service Guide for Coordinating a County Master GardenerTM Program is designed for use by Oregon State University Extension personnel in developing and managing a county or multi-county Master Gardener Program.
 
The information and resource materials contained here will be useful to both Extension personnel considering a Master Gardener Program for the first time, as well as those currently managing a program.
 
It includes:
  • Materials for recruiting, training, and managing OSU Extension Master Gardener volunteers
  • Organizational and managerial tips for Master Gardener Program staff
  • Information on the Oregon Master Gardener Association and County Master Gardener Associations
  • Policies and Procedures of the OSU Master Gardener Program
  • Copies of reference documents that may be of use to Master Gardener Program staff
For more detailed information and guidelines on general volunteer management, refer to the Staff Handbook on Volunteer Development available through the 4-H Program on campus. If you have suggestions, comments or questions about any part of this Service Guide, please contact:
 
Gail Langellotto
Master Gardener State Program Coordinator
4017 Ag and Life Sciences Bldg
Corvallis, Oregon 97331-7304
Phone: Fax: 541-737-3479
OSU Master Gardener™ volunteers are vital to Extension Services nationwide. Volunteers helped create the Extension Service in the early 1900s, and continue to guide its growth and development.
 
The time and talent donated by volunteers enable the Extension System to create and maintain stronger, more relevant programs and greater visibility in the community. Through Master Gardeners, we have reached more people throughout the U.S., served more communities, and created greater clientele confidence.
 
Successful Master Gardener Programs are the result of a solid working relationship between Extension personnel and Master Gardener volunteers. The Extension-Volunteer Partnership has been shown to be most satisfying when volunteers are provided a solid educational foundation, perform service that is recognized and valued, and have an opportunity to continue and advance their training. Likewise, Extension personnel perform best when they receive training and information on working with volunteers, and are able to efficiently and effectively utilize the time and talent of volunteers. 
The purpose of the OSU Extension Master Gardener Program is to provide training for volunteers who in turn assist in providing community horticulture services to the public. Under the auspices of Oregon State University Extension, individuals with an active interest in horticulture enroll in an intensive training program in horticulture and related fields. When the trainees complete the 40-72 hour training program, passing all assessments required by their county Master Gardener Program, they become an OSU Extension Master Gardener. The volunteers are then expected to provide service hours, comparable to the number of hours received in training, to Extension-sponsored horticultural activities. This service after the training is referred to as ‘volunteer payback’, ‘volunteer practicum’ or ‘volunteer service requirement’ by various county Programs across the state. At the statewide level, and throughout this manual, the service is referred to as ‘volunteer service requirement’.
 
After completing the training and volunteer service requirement, the Master Gardener is certified for one calendar year as an Oregon State University Extension Service Master Gardener. Advanced training and recertification opportunities are available on an annual basis for those wishing to continue in the Master Gardener Program.
 
While the concept is simple, the process of implementing this program is more demanding. There are costs for the program in time and personnel, but these should be considered investment costs. The Master Gardener Program allows the local County Extension office to provide community horticulture education and services to a public demanding assistance, and to develop a broader clientele base. If your programming has not been addressing community horticulture issues, you may find that this clientele group can offer you important support with your county government. 
 
Supporting Appendix
Supporting Publication

Flagship Programs of the OSU Extension Master GardenerTM Program

The two flagship programs of the OSU Master Gardener Program are Sustainable Gardening and Local and Backyard Food Production.  These areas have always been a focal point of Master Gardener trainings and service, but having formally decided upon these programs in 2008 helps to guide communications about the Program, basic and advanced training opportunities and planned Extension publications.
 
Sustainable Gardening . A ‘sustainable garden’ is defined as one where the gardener is able to meet their needs and expectations, without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs. Lectures, workshops, seminars and Extension publications teach Master Gardeners and others how to adopt and maintain more sustainable gardening practices. 
 
Local and Backyard Food Production. Local and backyard food production contributes to a sustainable food system, greater food security and a nutrient rich diet. Lectures, workshops, seminars and Extension publications teach Master Gardeners and others about the various aspects of vegetable gardening and fruit production in a private or community garden.
The actual recruitment process should start two to five months before training begins. At this point in the calendar year, you may have already accumulated a list of people who have expressed interest in the program. You may have collected names at public gardening events, farmer's markets or in the Extension office.  Potential volunteers may have called to ask about training opportunities, or they may have used the online sign-up form to receive an application for the next Master Gardener training in your county.  You probably have other sources of potential volunteers through a newsletter mailing list, garden club contacts, and so on.
 
Before accepting potential volunteers into an annual training class, consider how many volunteers you need to keep your program going and to keep your program growing.  Do you have the time to schedule and supervise the activities of 10, 20, or 50 volunteers? What types of skills and experience do you require from volunteers, to continue the activities you have planned for the year? 
 
The factors you consider and how many volunteers you choose to accept are up to you. Having the Master Gardeners assist with clientele requests for gardening information and doing simple diagnoses of routine plant problems is a common activity. This may be the only activity you wish to supervise, or you may have other activities in mind. Some activities may require very specific skills or interests from Master Gardener volunteers, while others may be more general.
 
It is important to recruit from all communities, adult ages, and ethnic groups in your area. This will provide you with a pool of potential volunteers with diverse backgrounds and interests. This diversity can be of great benefit in reaching a broader audience. Potential volunteers must also be willing to work in the specific jobs and locations where you need assistance.
 
One of the best ways to advertise the Master Gardener Program is through the mass media - newspaper, radio, television, and on your county’s website. An article in the local newspaper’s gardening column and announcements on TV and radio interviews can generate many applications. Poster announcements in nurseries, garden centers, farmers markets and at Extension events will also generate interest.  If your county and/or Master Gardener Program maintains a social media presence (e.g. Facebook, Twitter, etc.), these can be especially good resources for reaching a broader audience of potential volunteers.
 
Some counties hold informational meetings to introduce the Master Gardener Program to potential applicants. This serves the dual purpose of eliminating those people who are looking for gardening information but are not interested in volunteering, as well as beginning the process of orienting future Master Gardeners to the OSU Extension Service. Current Master Gardener volunteers can be invited to describe their experiences with the Program, including their time in training sessions and volunteer activities.
 
Supporting Resources

Selection of OSU Extension Master Gardener™ Trainees

The success of the Master Gardener Program depends greatly upon who is selected for training. One of the most common errors made in this type of program is the belief on the part of the coordinator that all applicants should be accepted and trained; and the belief on the part of an applicant that they have the right to be a volunteer, no questions asked.
 
Oregon State University Extension wants to provide the best possible educational programs and activities to volunteers, as well as to the general public. Master Gardener volunteers are asked to assist in providing quality programs and services to the general public. In turn, volunteers receive special training and support. This is a partnership with responsibilities on the part of both sides.
 
The quality of the volunteer corps serving as Master Gardeners will make or break the program. Thus, base your selections of Master Gardener trainees on the following factors:
  • The jobs or tasks the Master Gardeners will perform: Before accepting trainees into the program, you should know how you plan to utilize the Master Gardener volunteers and what the focus of your program is to be. Select those applicants with an interest in horticulture and in the specific jobs that you need to be filled.
  • The reason a person wants to become an OSU Extension Master Gardener: What motivates an applicant is one of the most significant factors in the success of a Master Gardener. The applicant, who wishes to share his or her knowledge, enjoys working with people or values providing service in their community tends to make the best volunteer. On the application form or during an interview, explore the interest and motivation of applicants.
  • The availability of the applicant, relative to the availability of volunteer opportunities: Although a potential applicant may have the interest in specific tasks that are needed in your program, and may possess the proper motivation, he or she may not be available when you need him or her volunteer. Plant clinic and diagnosis during Extension office business hours may best be suited to retirees or others with a flexible schedule. Plant clinic and diagnosis during weekend farmer’s markets (seasonal) and online are volunteer opportunities that are likely to be more accessible to a more diverse array of volunteers.
You may want some assistance in selecting Master Gardener candidates, especially if you have more applicants than slots to fill. Assistance in selecting the optimum candidates can come from an advisory group or a committee of current Master Gardeners. Appendix B.2 includes a sample application form. You should first review the applications and select individuals who appear to have interests in line with your program plans and volunteer opportunities, before working with an advisory or selection committee to choose Master Gardener candidates.
 
In addition to reviewing written applications, it can be useful to conduct personal interviews. A face-to-face interview gives you the opportunity to question items on the application, and gives the potential volunteers the opportunity to express themselves verbally. The interview need not be very long, especially considering that you may have a number of people to interview. To facilitate this process, Appendix B.3 includes sample interview questions. Contact the Extension Human Resources office on campus for University guidelines on interviewing techniques.
 
Notify applicants not accepted into the training program as well as those who are. You may want to maintain applicants on a waiting list for the following year, or to accept into the program if someone drops out very early in the training period. Sample acceptance and rejection letters may be found in Appendices B.4 and B.5.
 
Supporting Resources
 
When the prospective Master Gardener trainees receive their application, or sometime before they commit themselves to the program, Master Gardener applicants must sign and return copies of all required forms.  Please check the required forms page for a current listing of all required forms.
 
All documents should be retained for a minimum of 7 years after the volunteer has ended their time with the OSU Extension Master Gardener Program.
 
OSU Extension Master Gardener volunteers are expected to follow the same personnel rules that all Extension employees follow. Oregon State University, and hence the OSU Master Gardener Program, does not tolerate discriminatory behavior, sexual harassment, nor alcohol or drug use on the job. In some cases Extension personnel must “deselect” volunteers who cannot follow the basic rules of Oregon State University or do their job as an OSU Extension Master Gardener volunteer properly. Please refer to the Policies and Procedures section of this Service Guide, entitled Dismissing a Volunteer’, for more information.
 
Supporting Website

Orientation of OSU Extension Master Gardener™ Volunteers

Time should be taken to introduce new OSU Extension Master Gardener volunteers to their specific jobs and to Extension programming in their county. Orientation should go beyond that, however, to include knowledge of major programs and issues that OSU Extension and the Cooperative Extension System address on the local, state and national level. The clearer and more complete a picture that the Master Gardeners have of the Extension Service they are serving; the more they will be able to support your program.
 
Orientation to Extension and the Master Gardener Program can take place in several stages. As mentioned in the Identification and Recruitment section, some orientation can take place during informational meetings. Other opportune times for orientation are the first and last training sessions. OSU Extension publication EM 8749 ‘An Introduction to Being a Master Gardener Volunteer’, which is ordered separately from the EM 8742 Sustainable Gardening: The Oregon Washington Master Gardener Handbook, must be included with the handbook for new trainees and can assist in the process of volunteer orientation.
 
It may be helpful to give trainees an overview of the OSU Extension Master Gardener Mission, Vision, and Actions Statement in conjunction with their reading of EM8749. An additional resource describing the depth and breadth of the OSU Master Gardener Program is the Master Gardener Program Annual report. Annual reports are available in hardcopy from the state coordinator.  They are also posted online.
 
Supporting Publications

Educational Opportunities for Master Gardener™ Volunteers

The primary reason many volunteers enter the Master Gardener Program is to receive education in the area of community horticulture and plant science. If this is accomplished through a good training program, it is easier to maintain volunteers’ motivation.
 
The OSU Extension Service Master Gardener basic training program is intended to provide volunteers, who are striving to become Master Gardeners, with a broad range of horticultural related information. This information should augment their existing knowledge and abilities, bring them up to date on new horticulture practices and issues, and help them develop skills that will enable them to share this information with others. Ultimately, the training should both challenge and benefit the volunteer and meet the needs of the volunteer program manager in training new individuals that can assist with educational outreach in their community.
 
Master Gardener training should consist of at least 40 hours of class time. Required classes include a core of 3 subjects that are considered to be integral to a Master Gardener volunteer’s training and education (Basic Botany, Pesticides, MG Program). In addition, individual Master Gardener Programs can tailor their curriculum to meet local needs, by choosing courses from each of the 3 major areas of emphasis of the Master Gardener Program. These areas are: Plant Problem Diagnosis, Sustainable Gardening, and Backyard and Community Food Production. The specific details of each class are largely determined by local needs, as well as the individual speakers who are recruited to teach a class. If you have topics that you would like a speaker to include in their class, please make sure to communicate your preferences when you extend an invitation to a prospective speaker.  Whenever possible, ‘hands-on’ training should be used, and instructors should be encouraged to bring, or the local program office should make available, examples of pests, soils, plants, etc., to enhance learning.
 
In addition to the basic training program, most OSU Extension Master Gardener Programs, as well as Oregon Master Gardener Association (OMGA) chapters, provide continuing education opportunities for volunteers. Additional opportunities for education and advanced training include all-day garden fairs and seminars. If the Master Gardener Program or the Master Gardener Association within your area is hosting such an event, please make sure to send the details to the Statewide Coordinator’s office, so that the event can be posted on the Master Gardener website targetted to the general public, as well as to current Master Gardener volunteers
 
Gardener’s Mini-College is a 3 day event co-hosted by the Statewide Master Gardener Program and the Oregon Master Gardener Association. This event, which usually occurs in late July or early August of each year, features tours, workshops and seminars on a variety of topics of interest to Master Gardeners. A bookstore, chapter sales, silent auction, door prizes, banquets, chapter scrap books, seed exchange and garden tours are also usually included as part of this annual event.

OSU Extension Service Master Gardener™ Curriculum

The primary reason many volunteers enter the Master Gardener Program is to receive education in the area of community horticulture and plant science. If this is accomplished through a good training program, it is easier to maintain volunteers’ motivation.
 
The OSU Extension Service Master Gardener basic training program is intended to provide volunteers, who are striving to become Master Gardeners, with a broad range of horticultural related information. 
 
This information should augment their existing knowledge and abilities, bring them up to date on new horticulture practices and issues, and help them develop skills that will enable them to share this information with others. Ultimately, the training should both challenge and benefit the volunteer and meet the needs of the volunteer program manager in training new individuals that can assist with educational outreach in their community.
 
A major focus of Master Gardener training should be directed at diagnosing plant problems and offering solutions. Volunteers adept at plant problem diagnosis and recommendations will be able to greatly assist Extension faculty and staff in serving the general public. The content of the basic training program should also support a Master Gardener’s ability to provide sustainable gardening solutions to plant and landscape problems, and to advise individuals within the community how to grow food in local conditions. Because Sustainable Gardening and Local and Backyard Food Production are the two flagship programs of the OSU Master Gardener program, curricular content should reflect these foci. Finally, a well-rounded program should orient trainees to the mission, role and responsibilities of OSU Master Gardener Program and Master Gardener volunteers.
 
Given curricular priorities, a suggested set of courses is listed below. Counties should include all required courses in their basic training program, and can choose classes that are most appropriate to local conditions and needs to satisfy requirements for Plant Problem Diagnosis, Backyard and Local Food Production and Sustainable Gardening. The specific details of each class can be tailored for local conditions. Whenever possible, ‘hands-on’ training is used, and instructors should be encouraged to bring, or the local program office should make available, examples of pests, soils, plants, etc., to enhance learning. .
 
Required Courses: In order to be certified as an OSU Master Gardener volunteer, all trainees must complete these classes.
 
The OSU Master Gardener Program
Understanding Pesticides                                                                              
Basic Botany
           
Plant Problem Diagnosis: Choose at least 2 of the following classes.
 
Diagnostics    
Insect ID        
Plant Pathology          
Weed ID and Management   
Vertebrate pest management 
Resources for Master Gardeners        
 
Sustainable Gardening: Choose at least 2 of the following classes.
Soils and Fertilizers    
Compost
Integrated Pest Management             
Sustainable Landscape Design          
Organic Gardening
Gardening for Wildlife
Rain Gardens
Water Quality
Waterwise Gardening
Native Plants
Invasive Species
 
Backyard and Community Food Production: Choose at least 2 of the following classes
Organic Gardening
Vegetable Gardening
Small Fruits
Home Orchards
Herbs  
Container Gardening 
Compost
 
Elective Classes: Choose as many classes as are necessary to round out curricular content.
Herbaceous Ornamental Plants                                                                                                          
Houseplants                                                                                                                                         
Lawns                                                                                                            
Localized Gardening (Coastal, Valley, High Desert, etc.)                
Pruning
Woody Ornamental Plants
 

OSU Extension Service Master Gardener™ Class Content

The content of particular courses will vary according to local needs, as well as the speaker which is recruited to present a particular topic. Nonetheless, the subheadings of topics listed under each class are presented as a suggestion.  
 
All educational information and content presented as part of the Master Gardener program should be research-based, and presented in an objective, unbiased fashion.  Please ensure that all speakers understand, and are willing to subscribe to this commitment.
 
* Introduction/Orientation to Master Gardener Program (30 Minutes - 1 hour)
Overview of Extension, it’s structure and programs offered
What is the Master Gardener Program and what is expected of volunteers in return for training provided
OMGA and its chapters, chapter activities and functions
Differences between OMGA Chapters and the OSU Master Gardener Program
 
* Botany (3 – 6 hours)
Introduction to horticulture, especially as it applies locally, definitions
General botany
Plant physiology, how plants grow (e.g. photosynthesis and respiration)
Plant morphology, terms and definitions
Non-plants groups of interest to Master Gardeners (e.g. fungi, algae, slime molds, lichens)
How organisms are classified (Linnean system of classification, Latin names)
Basic plant classification, diversity of plants (e.g. liverworts, mosses, ferns, horsetails, seed plants)
 
* Diagnostics (3 – 4 hours)
Procedures and step-wise methods of diagnosing plant ailments
The value of different sources of information (i.e. PNW handbooks, Extension publications, journal articles, Extension websites versus internet sources such as Wikipedia, newspaper articles, etc.)
Learning to use the PNW handbooks and other valid sources of information
Learning to use a holistic approach to diagnosing
Hands-on learning with plant samples or written descriptions of plant problems
 
* Entomology (3 – 4 hours)
Insect orders of particular interest to gardeners
Learning more about the PNW Insect Handbook (online version and hardcopy version),
Introduction to the OSU Insect ID Clinic services
How to diagnose insect problems, hands-on learning with plant samples or written descriptions of plant problems
 
* Pesticide Safety (3 – 4 hours)
Pesticides defined
Hazards and risks of pesticides (i.e. toxicity, LD50, signal words, pesticide poisoning)
Reading the product label
Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) and Pesticide Applicators
Storage, Disposal and Environmental Effects
 
* Plant Pathology (3 – 6 hours)
Definition of plant disease
Introduction to disease-causing organisms
Symptoms and signs of disease
Principles of plant disease management
Learning more about how to use the PNW Plant Disease Handbook (online version and hardcopy version)
Introduction to the OSU Plant Pathology Clinic services
How to diagnose plant disease problems, hands-on learning with plant samples or written descriptions of plant problems
 
* Resources for Master Gardeners (1 – 2 hours)
The value of different sources of information (i.e. PNW handbooks, Extension publications, journal articles, Extension websites versus internet sources such as Wikipedia, newspaper articles, etc.)
PNW Handbooks (hardcopy and online versions)
How to use resources in your local plant clinic
Where to go for more information
 
* Soils and Fertilizers (3 – 4 hours)
Definition and components of soil
Soil Structure, Mineral parts of soil, Water and Air relationship, Drainage
Soil pH, Mineral retention
Soil Organic Matter
Soil building methods, sustainability
Mineral needs of plants and Fertilizers
 
Compost (1 ½ - 3 hours)
Why Compost?
Components of Compost
Caring for your Compost Pile, Troubleshooting
Field trip to see local composting efforts
 
Container Gardening (1 ½ - 3 hours)
Types of containers (focus on cheap, no-cost, creative containers)
Basic needs of containerized plants - soil, water, nutrients, light
What to grow in containers
Common problems with containerized plants
 
Herbaceous Ornamental Plants (1 ½ - 3 hours)
Herbaceous ornamentals, defined
Annuals, propagation, planting, maintenance, seed saving
Herbaceous perennials, planting, management, propagation methods
Garden Design, Plant Selection, Soil Preparation
Maintenance, fertilizer, pruning
 
Home Orchards (3 hours)
Types and varieties for home gardens
Rootstock selections available for dwarfing trees
General cultural practices and care
Pest identification and controls
Maintenance, fertilizer, pruning
 
Houseplants (1 ½ hours)
General identification of types
Environmental needs of indoor plants
Potting media
Pests of indoor plants and their control
 
*Integrated Pest Management (3 hours)
OSU Extension IPM Mission
Principles of IPM – Monitoring, Identify the pest, Establish a threshold, Control using all available strategies
Cultural Control
Physical Control
Biological Control
Chemical Control
 
Lawns (3 hours)         
Varieties of grass and their best uses
Ecology of lawns and their needs
General care of lawns, fertilizers and lime, mowing, watering
Pest problems and control measures
Renovation of older lawns, thatching
Seeding and sodding methods
 
Localized Gardening -Coastal, Valley, High Desert, etc. (3 hours)
Soils, climate, growing season of local area
Adapted plants
Pest problems and control measures
Special challenges and opportunities
Top questions received in the local Master Gardener Plant Clinic
 
Organic Gardening (1 ½ - 3 hours)
USDA definition of ‘organic’, and how that applies to gardening
Organic methodologies – soil building, pest management
Organic fertilizers, organic pesticides
Credible resources for information on organic gardening
 
Pruning (3 hours)       
Tools and their use
Types of pruning cuts
Types of plants and how to prune them
Hands-on activity, if possible
 
Sustainable Landscape Design (1 ½ - 3 hours)          
Sustainability, defined
Water use, waterwise gardening
Invasive plants, prevention, alternatives to invasive ornamentals
Pesticide and Fertilizer use, Preventing run-off and water contamination
Introduction to IPM
Mulching, composting
Gas powered engines
 
Vegetable Gardening (3 hours)
Planning Your Garden
What to Grow
Soils and Bed Preparation
Planting
Season Extenders and Planting Arrangements
Post Plant Care
Maintenance and IPM
Abiotic Problems
Biotic Problems
 
Vertebrate pest management (1 ½ - 3 hours)
Identification of local types by damage, droppings, prints, and/or sight
Cultural control, including resistant plants and tolerance
Physical control
Baits and other means of chemical control
Resources for vertebrate pest management
 
Weed ID and Management (3 hours)
Growth cycles and types of weeds
Control measures, herbicides, mulches, groundcovers, mowing
Weed identification
 
Examination and Review (3 hours)

Coordinating the Annual Master Gardener Training

For a training program to be most successful, it requires some forethought as to how you want it to be developed. A well-organized effort is needed to reserve facilities, select and secure speakers and managing the program once training begins.
 
Training for the Oregon Master Gardener Program is usually completed between January and April. Some counties in central and south eastern Oregon, where the advent of the growing is delayed, begin their training later in the year to accommodate weather and travel.
 
Generally, training is provided by Extension faculty within the county, experienced program assistants, Extension faculty with statewide responsibilities, and/or experienced Master Gardeners. As needed, other professionals may be involved in the training program. You should begin planning your course schedule, and recruiting potential speakers for particular classes, approximately 3 months before training begins. A list of Extension faculty who are able to teach Master Gardener training classes, as well as the classes they can teach and the areas where they are willing to travel, can be found in Appendix B.11.
 
The Community Horticulture Working Group, which is comprised of Extension faculty and program assistants across the state who have responsibility for the Master Gardener Program in their local county, have developed a number of Power Point slide sets for use in Master Gardener training. Many of these slide sets can be found on the Urban and Community Horticulture Group Department of Horticulture Collaborative workspace (Urban and Community Horticulture group). Please refer to the Policies and Procedure section on the Collaborative workpace for more information. The slide sets, documents and other materials used in Master Gardener training can be modified to better fit the climate and growing conditions of your local Program.
 
Supporting Appendix
  • Appendix B.11. List of Extension faculty and others who teach Master Gardener training classes
 
In order for a trainee to become an OSU Extension Master Gardener, he or she must complete the training program and pass any quizzes and exams (sometimes called an “open book review”) with a 70% or better average. The Master Gardener trainee must also complete their service hours out of their local Extension office (also called ‘payback’ or ‘practicum’).
 
In counties with an active OMGA chapter, trainees are typically given free membership into the OMGA for one year following their graduation.  After the first year they will need to join their local Master Gardener Association or the OMGA in order to to remain an active member in the Association. Because the OMGA is separate from OSU Extension, membership in a local Master Gardener Association or the OMGA is not required, in order to remain an active Master Gardener volunteer.
 
To order Certificates of Completion and Master Gardener Badges for those who have completed the training course and their volunteer service hours, please contact the Extension Horticulture office specialist. 
 
Names of those who have completed all training requirements should be sent to the Extension office specialist. Master Gardener badges will then be ordered from A to Z Engraving. Badges, as well as an invoice that you must pay from your program funds, will be sent directly to your Extension office. 
 
For Certificates of Completion, you will be sent a set of blank certificates, which you can then fill out with the names of your newly accredited Master Gardeners. You may also request of set of Certificates of Appreciation from the Extension Horticulture office specialist. Once again, you will be sent a set of blank certificates, which you can personalize with the names of individuals or businesses that have supported your Master Gardener training program over the past year.

Extension Horticulture Office Specialist

Lee Ann Julson
4017 Ag and Life Sciences Building     
Corvallis, Oregon 97331-7304
Phone:  541-737-5480
Fax: 541-737-3479
leeann.julson@oregonstate.edu

Supporting Appendices

·         Appendix B.12. Copy of Certificate of Completion
 
 
The tuition fee charged for Master Gardener training varies from county to county. Some Master Gardener Programs (e.g. Umatilla, Central Oregon) charge a set price for tuition, of which 50% is refunded after the trainee has completed their volunteer service (payback) for the first year. This provides additional incentive for trainees to volunteer and provides an avenue to collect additional funds from individuals who do not complete the program.
 
Having a line-item budget for your Master Gardener training will help you to determine a reasonable tuition to charge. For example, the Sustainable Gardening: The Oregon Washington Master Gardener Handbook costs $30. Master Gardener badges cost $4.60 (with pin) or $5.60 (with magnet) each, plus shipping ($3.50 minimum shipping charge). These costs should be factored into students’ tuition fees.
 
Consider whether or not you will be making handouts for all classes, and what your photocopying costs may be. You can help to limit your photocopying costs by asking instructors to limit the size of their handouts, or by posting handouts (with permission from the instructor) on a dedicated website.
 
Other factors to consider, when determining the tuition you will charge, include:
  • Do you need to rent a facility in order to accommodate Master Gardener training?
  • Will you contribute to the cost of providing coffee and refreshments at breaks?
  • Do you have a budget for speaker mileage and lodging? This item will determine, in large part, who you invite to teach specific classes. 
  • Do you use fees from Master Gardener training to self-fund program assistants and other services? 
  • Do you have a Master Gardener Association that is willing and able to offer financial support for aspects of Master Gardener training? Some Master Gardener Associations contribute to the mileage and lodging expenses incurred by speakers. Other Master Gardener Associations subsidize the coffee and refreshments at breaks. 
Most county Master Gardener Programs are not in a position to subsidize the tuition of Master Gardener trainees. However, counties with active Oregon Master Gardener Association chapters sometimes work with their local chapter to subsidize tuition of new trainees, and thus keep costs down.  At the very least, the tuition should be set to recover the costs of delivering the annual Master Gardener training.
 
Supporting Appendix
 

Suggestions for a Successful Training Program

Determine the best class time for the Master Gardener Program within your county or region. Daytime training may prevent many working people from participating in the program. However, if you want Master Gardeners to be available during the day to do volunteer work, a daytime training schedule is recommended. Moreover, daytime training allows for a full day of training (i.e. 9 am to 4 pm), which will permit training to be completed in fewer sessions. However, if you'll be offering sufficient weekend and evening volunteer opportunities, you may want to hold classes in the evening to reach a larger audience.
 
You can solicit fellow Extension faculty, Master Gardener experts and experts in the community to serve as instructors for course topics. Make sure that instructors understand the mission of the Master Gardener Program, prior to teaching a class. You can ask your Extension colleagues for suggestions as to who is a dynamic and proven speaker on a particular topic, or you can ask the Master Gardeners for suggestions. Many Master Gardeners attend talks hosted by a variety of non-profit groups. They may have seen a speaker who is well-suited to teach a topic within the Master Gardener training curriculum.
 
Be sure to allow enough time for adequate treatment of each topic. Remember that the training should consist of about 50-70 hours of class time. Many coordinators find that this is not enough time to cover the topics on your syllabus, and the Master Gardeners may suggest that more time be spent on a certain subject area. It may be useful to ask your instructors how much time they feel they need to cover their topic.
 
Most topics can be covered in 3-hour blocks. Plan a 15 to 20 minute break during each session to help relieve mental and physical fatigue. Try not to have additional activities to complete during the break as this is inconsistent with allowing adequate time to socialize and relax between portions of the training.   
 
Provide adequate refreshments for trainees during breaks. In some counties, veterans Master Gardeners in the program provide refreshments for the training classes. In other counties, the Master Gardener trainees sign up for refreshments on a schedule during the first day or two of training. When refreshments are homemade, ask Master Gardeners and/or trainees to list the ingredients on a note card. This note card should be displayed with the dish, so that individuals with food allergies or food aversions can choose dishes accordingly.
 
Care must be taken to ensure that individuals do not miss too many hours of instruction. More than two sessions missed may be too many for students to fully benefit from the training course. Thus, you should provide students with your written policy on missed classes, prior to or at the first day of training.
 
Quizzes are useful for encouraging trainees to review the material presented. It also gives the coordinator an opportunity to see where participants are having difficulty understanding the material. Remember that many of the trainees have not been in a classroom situation or taken an exam in many years and may be apprehensive. In some counties, weekly quizzes or review questions are completed by the trainees. It may be helpful to review them in class or in mentor sessions with veteran Master Gardeners to make sure the trainees are keeping up with reading assignments and understanding the new material each week.
 

Master Gardener Training™ and Program Evaluation

OSU Extension Master Gardeners should be provided opportunities to evaluate their training, the program activities, and their volunteer experience. This helps the coordinator monitor the impact of the program and the level of satisfaction of the volunteers, both of which are essential to the programs' success.
 
Master Gardener input on their training is necessary to insure that the volunteers are provided with the information they really need to carry out their activities. Training evaluations can be conducted throughout, as well as at the end of, the training period. On the other hand, an evaluation conducted after contributing some of their volunteer hours will show if there are areas that require more extensive study, as well as areas that could be covered in less detail.
 
Because of their involvement in program delivery, Master Gardeners will have a different perspective on how educational programs and activities are being received by clientele, relative to Extension program staff. Thus, Master Gardener evaluation of program topics and delivery methods is very important.
 
In addition, a volunteer experience evaluation gives the Master Gardeners the opportunity to analyze the Extension-volunteer partnership in their county. These evaluations may be handled separately, or may be delivered, together on a single evaluation form. Consideration of the results will provide the coordinator with opportunity to make changes in the training program; the direction of educational programming; make adjustment in their management style; and, in specific volunteer assignments.
 
For Extension faculty that with a teaching component in their position descriptions, OSU Extension requires a minimum of three teaching evaluations (Citizen Evaluation of Teaching form) to qualify for a Satisfactory rating during the annual performance evaluation/review. This is required for all county Extension employees with a teaching component in their position descriptions. In addition, at least one peer teaching review is strongly suggested - using the form approved by your academic department.'
 
Supporting Appendices
 
·         Appendix B.14. Copy of Extension Educator Evaluation

OSU Extension Master Gardener™ Mentor Programs

Mentor programs have evolved in many Oregon counties’ Master Gardener Programs as an additional resource for the training and development of volunteers. The programs vary from county to county, but often use veteran Master Gardeners as Mentors during training and volunteer service. The Mentor-Mentee relationship can become a valuable tool for retaining and training volunteers.
 
Who are mentors? Mentors are veteran Master Gardeners who provide assistance to Master Gardener trainees based on their own experience. They may be self-organized and work under the auspices of the OMGA Chapter, but ultimately, they work under the direction of the Extension faculty or program assistant in the county office. Mentors must be certified Master Gardener volunteers (e.g., previous class of trainees) or recertified to serve in this capacity.
 
What kinds of services to mentors provide? Mentor programs, when they exist, vary from county to county. The following are some of the activities you might consider when setting up or changing a mentor program.
 
  • Mentors sometimes lead special informational sessions for 30 to 60 minutes (such as before class or over lunch).
  • Topics for mentor-mentee sessions can vary from review of quizzes, discussion of class materials, and additional practice in diagnosis to information items such as explaining the local OMGA chapter setup and activities.
  • Mentors can help the program staff keep contact with trainees during the training sessions and throughout their first-year volunteer service.
  • Mentors often join their mentees for their first few experiences serving in the county clinic or at public events.
 
Taking on a Mentor Program is a serious responsibility and requires additional follow-through on your part. However, the additional services they provide to the program and the initiation of Master Gardener Trainees can be well worth the additional effort.
 
Counties with mentor programs include: Jackson County, Clatsop County
 

OSU Extension Master Gardener™ Recertification

Once an individual has completed the necessary training and volunteer payback, he or she is certified as an OSU Extension Master Gardener. This certification is good for one year and OSU Extension Master Gardeners must recertify annually to remain on the "active" list and maintain the Master Gardener title. 
 
Recertification is defined as: Completing educational training to further/enhance the individual’s skills in the areas of community horticulture deemed important to the OSU Extension Master Gardener Program.
 
All educational information and content presented as part of the Master Gardener program (including recertfication) should be research-based, and presented in an objective, unbiased fashion.
 
Why do we require recertification? As time goes by, we all forget details of diagnosis and appropriate advice. Also, information changes rapidly as new research results and chemical products or appropriate cultural treatments become available. The goal is to keep our Master Gardeners updated and available to provide high quality and up-to-date advice to the public through the Master Gardener Program. 
 
To maintain a high standard in the Oregon Master Gardener Program, it is important to have some degree of uniformity for recertification requirements, while providing the flexibility needed within individual counties to meet local needs. Master Gardener recertification requires a continuing education component and a volunteer component.  Specifically, to be recertified, volunteers must:
  • Donate a minimum of twenty (20) hours of volunteer service for educational outreach each year, and
  • Complete ten (10) or more hours of approved continuing education.

In some cases you may want to specify where or on what those volunteer hours must be spent. Highly motivated Master Gardeners often donate additional hours and look forward to advanced training opportunities.

Supporting Appendices

 

Overview of the Online Master Gardener™ Training Course

The online Master Gardenertraining  Online is a joint program with Oregon State University (OSU) Extended Campus and Extension Service to educate Oregonians about the art and science of growing and caring for plants. This program also facilitates the training of a highly-educated group of volunteers. These volunteers extend sustainable gardening information to their communities through education and outreach programs.
 
This version of the online Master Gardener training course was first launched on Sept. 8, 2008. Participants taking the online Master Gardener basic training can choose from one of two options.
  • Certificate of Home Horticulture Option: Offered annually, from September through December and January through March.  Participants receive a Certificate of Home Horticulture upon successful completion of the online course. Cost: $495.
  • Master Gardenener Badge Option: Offered annually, from January through March.  Participants can earn a Master Gardener badge by successfully completing the online course, as well as the volunteer requirements of their local County Extension Office. Cost: $395.
The online Master Gardener basic training course is a 12-week long course with one module lesson per week. For each weekly module lesson, students spend an average oft one to two hours to viewing lectures, one hour on required readings and one to three hours on assignments and quizzes.
 

Integrating Online-Trained Students with Local Programs

Online students will fill out an application for the program, if they want to pursue a MG badge.  County coordinators will review applications, and potentially contact students to make sure that they understand the volunteer requirements for that county.  The student should agree that they can fulfill the volunteer requirement, and the county coordinator should agree that the student is a good candidate for their program before they are accepted as an MG trainee.
 
The State Coordinator’s office will make sure accepted students:
  • receive and read the OSU Extension Master Gardener Position Description
  • receive, read, sign and return a copy of the OSU Extension Master Gardener Volunteer Agreement
  • receive, read, sign and return, the OSU Extension Service Master Gardener Pest Control Recommendation Agreement
  • receive, sign and return the OSU Extension Master Gardener Code of Conduct
  • receive, sign and return the OSU Extension Photo Release
Students will be told to forward their completed paperwork to the county coordinator in which the student will be completing their service.
 
At some point, the coordinator will need to 'bring these students in' to their local Program and/or Association.  This means putting these students on email lists, contacting them about volunteer opportunities, tracking their service hours, etc.
 
I currently don't have a means to recertify these students, online.  Thus, some means of recertifying students that want to continue (exam, classes, and service hours) will have to be coordinated by you.
 
Badges and certificates of completion will also have to be ordered by you, once students fulfill their service requirement.  These orders are placed via Lee Ann Julson - but since you are keeping track of hours - only you will know if the student completed their service.
 
You will have to forward the names of all trainees who are MGs, upon successful completion of class and service hours (including online trained MGs) to the OMGA database manager.
 
Supporting Appendices
 
  • Appendix C.1. Letter to Prospective Online Master Gardener Course Students
  • Appendix C.2. Application for Online Master Gardener Course
  • Appendix C.3. Sample Syllabus for Online Master Gardener Course Students

Seasonal Delivery of the Online Master Gardener Course

The Online Master Gardener Course will be offered two times each year. In the fall (September – December offering) the course will be available only to those who are pursuing a Certificate of Home Horticulture. In the Winter (mid-January – April) the course will be available to those pursuing a Certificate of Home Horticulture, as well as those pursuing a Master Gardener Badge.

Recertification of Online-Trained Master Gardeners

In the future, the Master Gardener online course might be available as a recertification option for current Master Gardeners. However, this recertification option is not available online at this time. Currently, the Home Horticulture working group sets recertification standards. Master Gardener personnel oversee recertification requirements in individual counties.

Utilization of OSU Extension Master Gardener™ Volunteers

OSU Extension Master Gardeners can become involved in many different activities. One reason there is such variety is because Master Gardeners bring a wealth of expertise and experience to the program. You should strive to develop outreach programs that meet the community horticulture needs in your local community and also capitalize on the skills of the Master Gardeners. Answering questions via phone, email and the web, as well as fielding questions from “walk-in” clients are the most common tasks for Master Gardeners. These tasks require both good technical and people skills. Consider having Master Gardeners complete an interest and skill survey at the beginning of the training and every year following in order to better understand what projects they might be most interested in. This can help you match people with projects to insure the highest success rate.
 
It is important to remember that the first obligation of the Master Gardener volunteer program is to provide research-based sustainable gardening advice to the public through the many resources available, with other activities being secondary to this obligation. In addition to working in the plant clinic, volunteers might be involved in the following activities, often in full partnership with the local Master Gardener Association:
 
  • Extending gardening information to the general public through educational demonstration gardens, speaker’s bureau presentations, seminars or workshops, and when appropriate, community gardening projects
  • Providing gardening information through plant clinics at farmer’s markets, county fairs, garden centers, and nurseries
  • Working with youth in school outreach programs, special at-risk youth projects, and youth gardens
  • Working on adaptive gardening projects with the elderly and physically challenged
  • Working with immigrant or limited-income participants by translating Extension gardening publications for non-English speakers and developing classes about growing produce at home or working in non-profit community gardens welcoming a diverse audience
  • Working on special projects such as trial research gardens, plant, weed, or insect collections, horticulture-based image collections, and educational garden tours
  • Providing office assistance such as clerical or computer work and organizing Master Gardener activities
  • Serve as mid-managers to assist the Master Gardener Program Staff in conducting volunteer activities
  • Assist in developing educational displays, web-based education or design, brochures and other similar educational materials
  • Working with Extension staff to promote the Master Gardener Program by developing press releases, photographing Master Gardener events, and designing promotional brochures

OSU Extension Master Gardener™ Project Selection

Selecting appropriate projects for OSU Extension Master Gardener volunteers to be involved in is an important part of having a successful program. You will likely receive requests from a number of different organizations for Master Gardener assistance. And although many of the projects may be worthy and have a positive impact in the local community, they may not be appropriate for Master Gardeners. Below are eight points to consider when deciding whether or not to take on a new project. Also keep in mind that as the group takes on new projects, you may need to discontinue some existing projects in order to avoid over burdening volunteers.
  1. Consistency With OSU Extension Master Gardener mission - Consistency with Master Gardeners prime role i.e. - provide educational programs in community horticulture. Is it educational or busy work? Since extending reliable and research-based information to the public is the major goal of OSU Extension, consider the value of the project or program in the light of this mission.
  2. Enough Volunteer Staff -Will enough volunteers be ready and active to help. Don't over extend either yourself or your organization.
  3. Integrity - Integrity of the idea behind the project, is it something you want to be associated with? Many organizations want to be associated with Master Gardeners, and you carry a lot of clout in your tie with the University and the Extension Service. Do some background work to make sure the organization requesting your service is legitimate and something you want to be connected with. It is important to do this before you agree to become involved.
  4. Value - Is the project worth the time and effort? What is its value to the community? Your valuable time and talent should be used wisely, on well thought out, sound activities.
  5. Tenure - Are there long-term benefits from the project to the community and to the Master Gardener Program.
  6. Commitment - Are Master Gardeners committed to the project? Will you be expected to maintain this project endlessly? A well-planned project should have a definite completion time.
  7. Publicity Value - Does the project spread the "OSU Extension Master Gardener word"? Avoid projects where the Master Gardener contribution gets lost in the overview of the project.
  8. Appeal - Will Master Gardeners want to be involved in the project- all of them, or enough of them to get the work done? Remember that whoever promotes must also recruit helpers and manage their efforts. A project that is attractive to most Master Gardeners will be a lot easier to complete than one that only has the support of one or two. Also consider how many 'contacts' will be made as a result of the project. Keep in mind the total outcome and its value for the program in the long term.

Service Projects for OSU Master Gardeners™

The variety of service projects available to Master Gardeners will vary in the time commitment required. County Extension faculty should consider all of the possible service opportunities available to Master Gardeners within their program, and assign reasonable time estimates to each project. Master Gardener volunteers can use these guidelines when reporting their volunteer hours (Appendix D.1).
 
  • Public Educational Outreach - includes teaching, presentations or demonstrations, plant clinics/hotline, demo garden, fair educational exhibits, youth or senior gardening activities, news articles, radio shows, garden advisors for community groups or agencies, community events where an educational program is delivered, research trials, insect/weed collections, etc. Educational activities are those that have direct public contact, but it also includes your preparation time for these events. Your county’s MG Program Assistant/Agent will also announce other appropriate activities that arise from time to time, via the website or email. People with ideas for projects that may qualify as educational service are encouraged to discuss them with our counties MG Program Assistant/Agent.
  • MG Program Support Activities - hours that enhances or supports the Master Gardener program that doesn’t directly involve contact with the public. These hours include special skills work, or office support.
  • Chapter/OMGA Support Activities - These hours include Master gardener Association activities and meetings, officer/board preparation, telephone tree, fundraising events, community service (non-educational in structure - for example, pruning roses at a park, maintenance work at a senior center, etc.), promotional activities, special skills work, work in the greenhouse or the demo gardens, and work parties.. These hours are ones that are not directly related to educational outreach.*
  • Continuing Education - includes the educational  program portion of Association meetings, workshops, classes, repeat of starred basic training classes, starred seminars/Mini-College classes, tours, clinic orientation, etc. It can include leadership and personal development classes as well as subject matter classes that you take to increase your skills and knowledge (talk to the agent about how you intend to use the classes in the MG program).
 
Supporting Appendix
 
·         Appendix D.1. Volunteer Log Sheet
 

Volunteer Time for OSU Master Gardeners™

PLEASE NOTE:  New recertification standards were adopted by the OSU Extension Master Gardener Program at the July 2014 meeting of the home horticulture working group.  We are in the process of revising suggested volunteer time estimates to fit the new recertification standards.  We hope to post an update in the near future.
 
A list of potential service projects, and suggested time estimates, are listed below.
 
Public Educational Outreach
Volunteer Hours
Contact Person
Teaching/Public Speaking
ATS + preparation
MGP
Presentations/Demonstrations
ATS + preparation
MGP
Plant Clinics/Hotline
ATS
MGP
Ask an MG Booth at Farmers Markets, Home Shows, County Fair and other community Events
ATS + preparation
MGP
Demonstration Garden (when teaching or preparing an educational display)
ATS
MGP
Youth/Senior/Adaptive Garden Activities
ATS
MGP
News articles: County Newsletter, Local Newspaper, Chapter/OMGA Newsletter
ATS (within reason for article submitted)
MGP
Radio Show/TV Interview
ATS + preparation
MGP
Garden Advisors for community groups or agencies
ATS
MGP
Research Trials / Citizen Science
ATS
MGP
Insect/Weed collections
ATS
MGP
Community Education Projects
Volunteer Hours
Contact Person
Community Projects that are approved in advance by Agent/MG Program Asst i.e. Watershed Council projects, Zoo projects, City/Metro project,
ATS
MGP
Personal/Continuing Education
Continuing Education Hours               
 
Contact Person
Attend program portion of a Chapter Meeting: that are approved for recertification in advance
ATS at the program portion (chapter business meeting does not count for CEHs)
MGP or MG Ch (depending on County)
Master Gardeners Mini-College classes: that are approved for recertification in advance
ATS in class
MGP
Workshops, classes and tours: that are approved for recertification in advance
ATS in class and on tour
MGP
Recertification Test
Determined by County Program staff
MGP
Support Master Gardener Program Activities
[Support Hours]
Volunteer Hours
Contact Person
Interviewing/Mentor New Trainees
ATS
MGP
Extension Office Support, Organizing Class Materials, Setup, Hospitality/Refreshment, and Cleanup
ATS
MGP
Chapter and Association Support Activities; OMGA
[OMGA Hours]
Volunteer Hours
Contact Person
Attend Board meetings
ATS + preparation for officers
MG Ch
Attend the business portion of Chapter Meeting
½ hour per meeting
MG Ch
Attend the program portion of Chapter Meeting
ATS
MG Ch
Fundraising Events: Spring Fair/Plant Sale, Fall Bulb Sale, Organizing Gardening Conference etc
ATS
MG Ch
Webmaster for chapter website
ATS
MG Ch
Chapter Newsletter Editor
ATS
MG Ch
 
ATS = Actual Time Spent, rounded to the nearest quarter hour.
MGP = Agent/MG Program Asst or Assigned Coordinator
MG Ch = Chapter Board Member or Committee Chair
 
For graduation: A minimum number of hours, which varies according to county, of practicum/payback time are required for trainees to complete their training and to become OSU Extension Master Gardener volunteers. Of these hours, a set portion needs to be spent in training and staffing a plant clinic/hotline. The remaining hours can be in other public educational outreach areas or in Master Gardener Program support or Chapter support. The hours can be paid back over more than 1 year, if the agent or program coordinator agrees. In this case, students will graduate, and will become OSU Extension Master Gardener volunteers, in the year that their service hours are completed.
 
For veteran Master Gardeners, no payback hours are typically required, but volunteers should still track and turn in their volunteer hours. For those veteran Master Gardeners that would like to recertify to work at plant clinics, a test must be taken and passed or class hours (Master Gardener training or advanced coursework) must be accumulated. Recertification is required on an annual basis, in order for veteran Master Gardeners to work at plant clinics.
 

OSU Extension Master Gardener Volunteer Reporting System

Program Coordinators

This section is intended to give Program Coordinators a broad overview of how to work through the system.
 
Do not give the Master Gardener the instructions for Program Coordinators. The link for the coordinator enrollment page is deliberately hidden. You cannot access the link by navigating through the volunteer reporting system home page (http://extension.oregonstate.edu/mg/vrs/index.php). Only those who know the coordinator link can enroll as a county coordinator. This is because those with a ‘coordinator’ authorization can view and edit all MG volunteer entries from their county.
 
Coordinator Enrollment Page: From this page, you can enroll as a coordinator. If you are a coordinator, AND a Master Gardener, enroll as a coordinator. You will be asked, during the enrollment process, if you will be reporting volunteer hours as a Master Gardener. If you answer ‘yes’, you will be able to both access reports of Master Gardeners from your county, as well as enter in your own volunteer hours, continuing education hours, etc. 
 
 
After you enroll, you will need to login to access the system.  Once logged in, you will notice several things that may be useful:
  1. The county or counties that you have enrolled to manage will be listed at the bottom left hand corner of the web page.
  2. Your administration links can be found on the left hand side of the page. Most links are self-explanatory, but explore, just to see what the system has to offer.
  3. The User Management link (on the left hand side of the web page), can be used to enroll Master Gardeners who cannot enroll themselves, or to retrieve a forgotten password. You can also use the User Management Link to send an email to all Master Gardeners enrolled in the VRS within your county.
  4. Enroll a Master Gardener: Use this option for Master Gardeners who continue to turn in paper copies of volunteer service hours and continuing education hours. The VRS accepts usernames that are in the form of an email address. Thus, choose a username (fake email address) that can be easily associated with that Master Gardener. Examples would be Gail.Langellotto@MG.com or Joe.Smith@MG.com
  5. The Admin Home Link will take you back to your homepage on the volunteer reporting system.
Volunteer Reports Home: From this page, you can log into the VRS, once you have enrolled. If you are enrolling as a Master Gardener, you can do so form this page. You cannot enroll as a coordinator from this page.
 
Questions? Comments?
Should you have any questions or comments, please use the ‘Tech Support’ link (on the left hand side of the page, under ‘Useful Links”) to submit your comments directly to the web developer. We will make a best effort to improve the current system, based upon all comments received.

Overview Online Volunteer Reporting System (VRS)

The OSU Master Gardener Program online volunteer reporting system is now available. This handout is intended to give Master Gardener volunteers a broad overview of how to work through the system.
Volunteer Reports Home: http://extension.oregonstate.edu/mg/vrs
From this page, you can enroll in the Volunteer Reporting System as a Master Gardener.   Simply click the link on the left hand side of the page that says ‘Enrollment’. You will then be taken to the:
Master Gardener Enrollment Page: http://extension.oregonstate.edu/mg/vrs/enrollment
After you enroll, you will need to login in order to access the system. Your username is the email address you entered when you enrolled.
Once you are logged in, you can begin entering:
·         volunteer service hours and category of service (i.e. plant clinic in Extension office, school garden, plant clinic in farmer’s market, speaker’s bureau, etc.). If the category of your volunteer service hours are not listed (i.e. pruning specialist demonstration, compost specialists demonstration), please choose ‘other’, and write in a description of your service category. If there are enough ‘other’ descriptions written in for a certain category, we may add in more pull down options. However, I wanted to keep the list of pull down service categories manageable, and applicable to all counties. (Many of the specialist programs are specific to only one or a few counties).
·         continuing / advanced education hours
·         miles driven for volunteer service (you can use this log for your tax records, to the extent permitted by law)
·         pounds of produce donated from your private garden or community garden to a local food bank or food pantry. Make sure that you do not double report a group donation. Thus, if you and 5 other community gardeners donated a total of 50 pounds of produce to a local food bank, you would want to be sure that all 5 of you do not report donating 50 pounds.
 
To log out, click the ‘Log Out’ link near the top left hand of the web page. This link can be found just to the left of the ‘Contact Us’ link.
Questions? Comments?
 
Should you have any questions or comments, please use the ‘Tech Support’ link (on the left hand side of the page, under ‘Useful Links”) to submit your comments directly to the web developer. We will make a best effort to improve the current system, based upon all comments received.

Online Volunteer Reporting System (VRS)

Enrollment 

This section provides an overview of how to enroll in the VRS.
 
Volunteer Reports Home: http://extension.oregonstate.edu/mg/vrs
Volunteer Reports Enrollment: http://extension.oregonstate.edu/mg/vrs/enrollment
 
All items marked with an asterisk (*) require an answer. Items without an asterisk are optional.
 
Email*: Please type in your email. This email will also be your ‘username’ that you use when you log into the online volunteer reporting system.
 
Password*: Please choose a password, between 6 and 10 characters in length, that you will remember. Your local Master Gardener coordinator and the statewide Master Gardener coordinator will be able to retrieve your password for you, should you forget. Thus, you should make the password one that is different from any ‘high security’ passwords you might have (i.e. those connected to your email, banking sites, etc.).
First Name*: Please enter your first name.
Last Name*:   Please enter your last name.
Address*:   Please enter a street address. Your mailing address will not be distributed, shared or made public. The mailing address will be used only if your local or the statewide Master Gardener Program staff needs to contact you in connection with Master Gardener business.
Address: Please enter in an apartment number or other additional address information.
City*: Please enter your city.
County*: This is the county in which you report your Master Gardener volunteer service hours, and not necessarily the county in which you live. (Some Master Gardeners are associated with a Master Gardener Program in a different county than their county of residence).
 Zip*: Please enter your zip code.
Phone*:   Please enter a contact phone number. This phone number will be used only if your local or the statewide Master Gardener Program staff needs to contact you in connection with Master Gardener business.
Are you a dues-paying member of the Oregon Master Gardener Association?: Most, but not all, Master Gardener volunteers are also members of the Oregon Master Gardener Association. If you would like to learn more about the Oregon Master Gardener Association, please ask your Program Coordinator to direct you to your chapter representative, or visit http://extension.oregonstate.edu/mg/omga
Last year you were certified*: Master Gardener Certification is good for 1 year. Master Gardeners are encouraged to recertify each year, by taking qualified recertification courses and fulfilling volunteer service requirements. Requirements for recertification courses and continuing volunteer service hours vary by county. Please check with your local Program Coordinator to learn more about recertification requirements and opportunities in your area.
Year you became a MG*: This is the year that you graduated from being a Master Gardener trainee, and were awarded a Master Gardener badge. 

Online Volunteer Reporting System (VRS)

Report New Volunteer Service Hours

This sheet provides an overview of how to report your volunteer service hours.
 
Once enrolled, choose the link titled ‘Report New Volunteer Service Hours’ from your home page. You will be asked to choose between Volunteer Service Hours or Continuing Education Hours. 
 
Volunteer Service Hours are those hours that you spend as a Master Gardener volunteer, on a variety of projects that benefit your local Extension office and your local community.
 
Continuing Education Hours are those hours that you spend in classes and seminars, which qualify for recertification credit in your county. In order to work at the Plant Clinic desk, where you answer questions from the public and deliver recommendations, it is important to accrue the educational credits necessary to maintain your Master Gardener certification.
 
Report Hours: Volunteer Service Hours
 
All items marked with an asterisk (*) require an answer. Items without an asterisk are optional.
 
Category*: You will be asked to choose among 13 different service project categories, which are listed alphabetically. Brief descriptions of each service category can be found below. All projects for which you submit volunteer hours must be approved by your Master Gardener Program Coordinator and/or local Extension Agent. Thus, you may be very active in your local community garden, projects for which you receive credit should be focused on education and must be approved by your local Master Gardener faculty and/or staff members
Current VRS categories are listed below. 
  1. Plant Clinic 
  2. Instructor 
  3. Educational Garden 
  4. Educational Article 
  5. Event Planning
  6. Class Mentor
  7. Fundraiser
  8. Extension Office Support
  9. MG Association
  10. Other Approved Projects
Date of Service*: It is important to remember that this reporting system can and should be flexible.
You can input your Date of Service by manually typing in a month, day and year (mm/dd/yyyy), or by using the date picker.
 
Date of service can have several applications. It does not necessarily only pertain to service on a single day. If you volunteer over a period of a week or a month and your service can be attributed to one category, you may use ‘Date of Service’ as a week-ending or month ending date. There is no need to input 5 separate records for work that took place over a week’s time.
 
·         Example 1: You volunteer 5 days per week doing administrative duties at the Extension office. Use ‘Date of Service’ as the week-ending date, and input your total hours of service for that week. In the ‘Description’ box, input ‘weekly service at Extension’.
 
·         Example 2: You volunteer several hours over the course of the year, for your work on the Insights into Gardening educational conference. Use ‘Date of Service’ as the month-ending date, and input your total hours of service for that month. In the ‘Description’ box, input ‘monthly service for Insights into Gardening’.
 
Location*: List the location of the service in 500 characters or less. Examples are ‘Jackson County Extension Office’, ‘Baker County Fairgrounds’, etc.
Description of Service: Writing a description of the service is optional, and is only necessary if you chose ‘Other (Describe)’ as the Project Category. Your description of service should be brief, and limited to 500 characters or less.
 
Volunteer Service Hours*: In put the total number of hours you have worked on the selected project, during the time period noted.
 
Mileage*: Please note the total miles driven for the selected project, during the time period note. You may be able to deduct mileage associated with volunteer service on your tax returns. Please check with a tax professional for verification of your particular deductions and tax situation.
 
 Pounds of produce donated from a Public or Demo Garden*: If fruits or vegetables harvested from a Master Gardener-affiliated or approved garden have been donated to a food pantry, food bank, or other charitable organization, please estimate and report the pounds donated. To avoid double-reporting on this item, make sure that no other Master Gardener is reporting produce donated from the same harvest. For example, five Master Gardeners work at the Ladybug Landing Garden in Coos County. A total of 30 pounds of produce is harvested and donated. Only one person should report the 30 pounds in the volunteer reporting system. It does not matter who reports the total donated. This information will be attributed to the Coos county, rather than to an individual.

 

Online Volunteer Reporting System (VRS)

Report New Continuing Education Hours

This sheet provides an overview of reporting your continuing education hours.
 
Once enrolled, choose the link titled ‘Report New Volunteer Service Hours’ from your home page. You will be asked to choose between Volunteer Service Hours or Continuing Education Hours. 
Volunteer Service Hours are those hours that you spend as a Master Gardener volunteer, on a variety of projects that benefit your local Extension office and your local community.
Continuing Education Hours are those hours that you spend in classes and seminars, which qualify for recertification credit in your county. In order to work at the Plant Clinic desk, where you answer questions from the public and deliver recommendations, it is important to accrue the educational credits necessary to maintain your Master Gardener certification.
 
Report Hours: Continuing Education Hours
All items marked with an asterisk (*) require an answer. Items without an asterisk are optional.
 
Date of Training*: Please list the date of the class or training that you attended. If training occurred over several days, you can use a week-ending date, rather than inputting each class separately.
Location*: Please report the name of the city or county where the training occurred.
Description of Training*Please write a short description of the class content. Limit your description to 500 characters or less.
Continuing Education Hours*: Write in the total number of hours spent at the training. You can enter in hours in decimal increments (i.e. 1.25 hours = 1 hour and 15 minutes).
Mileage*: Please note the total miles driven for the selected project, during the time period note. You may be able to deduct mileage associated with volunteer service on your tax returns. Your continuing education is an important part of your service as a Master Gardener volunteer, and may thus qualify as a deductible expense. Please check with a tax professional for verification of your particular deductions and tax situation. 
 

 

Recertification

Definitions
 
A common understanding of key definitions related to the Oregon State University (OSU) Extension Master Gardener Program will better enable Program faculty, staff and volunteers to understand, communicate, implement and adhere to associated policies.  We offer these definitions for consideration and discussion.
 
Certified OSU Extension Master Gardeners are those individuals who have satisfactorily completed all requirements needed to become an Extension Master Gardener volunteer in Oregon.    
  • Master Gardener trainees become certified upon:  completing the initial Master Gardener training course, passing a cumulative assessment with a score of 70% of higher, completing their required volunteer service hours (minimum of 40, actual number varies by county), and completing and filing required paperwork.  Certification is valid for one year.
  • Master Gardeners who continue past their first year of volunteer service must complete recertification requirements in order to remain a certified OSU Extension Master Gardener.
  • Certification is REQUIRED to deliver direct educational outreach to the general public, as an OSU Extension Master Gardener.  Examples of direct educational outreach are:  answering gardening or pest management questions; providing gardening or pest management advice; teaching a class or workshop, writing a newspaper column, etc.
Recertification is the process of completing the required paperwork (e.g. the conditions of volunteer service form), volunteer service hours (minimum of 20) and continuing education units (minimum of 10 hours) needed to remain a certified OSU Extension Master Gardener.  Certification is valid for one year.  Recertification is thus an annual requirement.
 
Volunteer Service Hours: is the time that an OSU Extension Master Gardener volunteer spends on OSU Extension-approved projects.    
 
Continuing Education Hours:  are the credits that a Master Gardener volunteer receives, for participating in an approved educational program that supports a volunteer's ability to deliver research-based and objective information to the general public.  
 
Balance of Volunteer Service Hours
 
Because the mission of the OSU Extension Master Gardener Program, as well as the National Extension Master Gardener Program, focuses on educating others about sustainable gardening practices ~ Master Gardener Volunteer Service Hours which support this mission should be given highest priority.  Direct and indirect educational hours should constitute at least 50% of a Master Gardener's  volunteer service hours in their initial year and 50% of a Master Gardener's volunteer service hours in their recertification years. 
 
Direct Educational Hours:  Master Gardener activities that have the potential to directly increase knowledge, change attitudes or change behaviors in ways that promote sustainable gardening.  A Master Gardener must be current on their certification, in order to participate in activities that qualify for direct educational hours.
  • Plant Clinic (no matter the venue):  plant clinic is the venue through which Master Gardeners receive gardening questions and provide high-quality recommendations to the general public.  Typical venues for plant clinic include:  the Extension office (walk-in, phone or email), Ask an Expert, farmer's markets, Master Gardener events (e.g. plant sales, fairs), other community events.
  • Instructor (at a conference, seminar series, Master Gardener training, speakers bureau, etc.):  includes the time it takes to research, prepare and deliver the presentation.
  • Educational Gardens (demonstration gardens, youth garden, school garden, prison garden, garden tour):  education must be the focus of these activities, and not garden labor without education.  Gardens should be used as teaching and demonstration sites, with appropriate signage and supporting materials.  Teaching a class in an educational garden, leading a tour, preparing signage or educational displays, or other educational activities may count towards direct service hours.  
  • Writing an Educational Article:  in a Master Gardener newsletter, for a local newsletter, or collaborating with an OSU Extension faculty member to write an Extension publication. Includes the time needed to research and write the article.
  • Other approved activities: as determined by your local Master Gardener coordination, in the context of current OSU Extension Master Gardener guidelines and policy
In addition to direct educational hours, there are many activities that facilitate or support the efforts of volunteer educators.  These are indirect educational hours.  The volunteer is not directly teaching others (via plant clinic recommendations or gardening talks or demonstrations), but is supporting the efforts of others who are serving as direct educators.
 
Indirect educational hours:  Master Gardener activities that facilitate or support the efforts of those who are teaching.
  • Educational Event Planning (conference, seminar series, MG training)
  • Master Gardener Training Class Mentor:  assisting with the annual Master Gardener training course.
  • Educational Garden Maintenance:  Educational gardens require basic upkeep in maintenance, in order to be effectively used in educational outreach.  Thus, garden maintenance and upkeep activities qualify for direct educational volunteer service hours if work in the garden supports an educational project or program, and if garden maintenance and upkeep activities are not the major focus of activity in the garden.  If garden maintenance and upkeep becomes the major focus of activity, it is time carefully examine the project, and re-calibrate back to the educational mission and focus of the Master Gardener Program.  
  • Other Approved Activities:  as determined by your local Master Gardener coordination, in the context of current OSU Extension Master Gardener guidelines and policy
Support Hours:  Master Gardener activities not focused on educational outreach, but whose efforts help to support the mission of the OSU Extension Master Gardener Program.
  • Fundraiser (plant sale, book sales, etc.)
  • Extension Office Support:  filing, database management, photocopies, or other duties related to the Extension office
  • MG Association:  including serving as an officer, board member or in an appointed position in a MG chapter or in the Oregon Master Gardener Association
  • Other Approved Activities:  as determined by your local Master Gardener coordination, in the context of current OSU Extension Master Gardener guidelines and policy
In order to qualify for MG Service Hours, projects or activities must:
  1. adhere to applicable OSU policies and procedures,
  2. be approved by the OSU Extension faculty and staff coordinating the Master Gardener Program
  3. be reported to OSU Extension
Reporting Volunteer Service Hours
 
Currently, 15 of 28 Oregon counties with an active Master Gardener Program use the online Volunteer Reporting System (VRS, extension.oregonstate.edu/mg/vrs) to track volunteer service hours and continuing education hours.  
 
VRS categories should:
  1. reflect the categories outlined in recommendation #1 (above), 
  2. align with national Extension Master Gardener reporting requirements
Current VRS categories are listed below. 
  1. Plant Clinic 
  2. Instructor 
  3. Educational Garden 
  4. Educational Article 
  5. Event Planning
  6. Class Mentor
  7. Fundraiser
  8. Extension Office Support
  9. MG Association
  10. Other Approved Projects
Continuing Education Hours
 
Continuing education is critical  to promoting high quality and up-to-date gardening advice and recommendations within the Master Gardener program.  Thus, Master Gardener faculty and staff should carefully consider and plan for continuing education opportunities within their county, in much the same type of care used to plan annual Master Gardener training classes.  
 
To be counted towards recertification, a continuing education class should:
 
1a.  present research-based information on sustainable horticulture in an objective manner 
 
or 
 
1b.  support or improve an individual's ability to serve as a volunteer Extension educator 
 
2.  be taught by a qualified instructor 
 
***a qualified instructor is one who uses research-based information, presents information in an objective manner, and who is an effective and engaging presenter
 
3.  extend the curriculum taught during the basic Master Gardener training course 
 
***a Master Gardener should not be able to accrue all of their continuing education credits by sitting in on annual Master Gardener training courses.  Endeavor to offer new or advanced classes, workshops or webinars.
 
Master Gardeners accrue continuing education hours as:  time spent in class (rounded up to the nearest 15 minutes), qualifies towards continuing education hours requirements.
  • Example 1:  a Master Gardener views a webinar that lasts 90 minutes.  They are able to report 1.5 continuing education hours.
  • Example 2: a Master Gardener attends a class that lasts 70 minutes.  They are able to report 1.25 continuing education hours.
To support recertification efforts, the statewide program office should coordinate the efforts of the home horticulture working group to:
  1. share news and information about local advanced training opportunities, that qualify for  continuing education credit
  2. develop and publicize a calendar of continuing education opportunities across Oregon, as well as nationally-relevant and accessible webinars
  3. develop a monthly webinar series of classes that qualify for recertification credit.  If possible, these webinars will be archived, online, for future and repeat viewing.
  4. develop an annual online assessment that Master Gardener volunteers can use to see what areas they may want to focus on, in order to improve their ability to provide research-based educational outreach to the general public
Recognizing Recertified Master Gardeners
 
Master Gardeners who have completed all recertification requirements are eligible to participate in direct educational activities, and should be distinguished from Master Gardeners who are no longer current on their certification.
 
Starting in 2016, we recommend that all Master Gardeners who have met recertification requirements in the preceding year, be given something that signifies that they are current in their certification.  Possibilities include a hangbar that they can attach to their badge, or a lapel pin that is separate from their badge.
 
Please note:  since the OSU Extension Master Gardener logo was updated in 2015, this may be a good time to redesign the Master Gardener badge to include new logos.  
 

Recognition of OSU Extension Master Gardener Volunteers

 
Recognition, both in the sense of developing an OSU Extension Master Gardener identity and in recognizing service to the Master Gardener Program, is very important. Trainees are awarded Master Gardener badges at the end of the training classes and a Certificate of Completion upon fulfillment of the initial volunteer service. Name badges and certificates may be ordered through the Extension Horticulture Office Specialist. The badges are sent directly to the program staff with the trainee’s name, county and training year engraved. The certificates come signed by the State Coordinator. Certificates will  need to have the trainees name printed on them and the Master Gardner Program staff signature added. (See example in Appendix B.12).
 
Certificates of Recertification for veteran Master Gardeners who have satisfied recertification requirements may be ordered from the Extension Horticulture office specialist. You may make certificates for those who have satisfied the recertification requirements (classes and/or exam) in your county. A sample certificate of recertification can be found in Appendix B.17.  
 
Completion of the training may be celebrated by a simple luncheon or potluck. Fulfillment of volunteer service, however, calls for a special awards ceremony. This can be done in a formal banquet setting or may be something more informal. New OSU Master Gardeners and veterans should be honored. For either event, consider having a local official, garden writer or a representative from Oregon State University help make the formal presentations. Invite someone from the local paper to cover the awards ceremony, or send an article to the paper with the names of the honorees.
 
And remember - on a day-to-day basis - a simple and sincere "thank you" for a job well done can be a very motivating and meaningful gesture for volunteers. Consider highlighting exceptional dedication as well as acknowledging everyday or on-going projects in the newsletter.
 
 
Supporting Appendices
 
·         Appendix B.12. Copy of Certificate of Completion
·         Appendix B.17. Sample Recertification Certificate
 

Managing the OSU Extension Master Gardener™ Program

The daily management of the OSU Extension Master Gardener Program is both challenging and rewarding. The county coordinator will be faced with many problems, issues and tasks. In order to deal with these, he or she must assume a variety of roles that include manager, supervisor, leader, decision maker, and educator.
 
As county coordinator, your job is to ensure that the mission and vision of Oregon State University Extension are realized through the educational activities you organize and the classes you teach. The Master Gardener classes are organized so that ideas and knowledge are transmitted, received, and accepted by the trainees. It is your task to be sure that the Master Gardeners, in turn, effectively communicate this knowledge and ideas to others.
 
Master Gardener volunteers should be involved in making some decisions and in setting program priorities. Most Master Gardeners are highly motivated, knowledgeable, and competent. Make them your allies and let them create their own challenges and opportunities whenever possible. If your program is large, you may want to develop an advisory board to provide balanced input from volunteers and help with strategic planning. Developing a management style that allows everyone to be a participant is important.
 
Encourage key Master Gardeners to take on leadership responsibilities for various projects. Although you are responsible for the overall program, and are essential as an advisor, do not feel that only you can decide how to implement the program or what activities should be carried out. The Master Gardeners must have opportunities to be responsible for some significant part of the program. Without adequate opportunities for input, planning and responsibilities for the program, many will lose their interest and motivation, and you'll be left with the burden of handling every aspect of the program. The best way to keep interest high and retain Master Gardeners in the program is to give them plenty of opportunities to volunteer and to continue learning.
 
Frequent communication is an important part of keeping Master Gardeners active. This can take the form of a county-based newsletter and/or monthly meetings. Most all counties have a local chapter of the Oregon Master Gardener Association (see pages 18-21 for more information about OMGA) and they hold monthly meetings. Regular attendance to these meetings will allow you opportunity to learn more about chapter activities and to discuss future projects and activities with the group.
 
Provide the Master Gardeners with descriptions of various activities and projects, as well as job descriptions when appropriate, and encourage them to keep their volunteer hours and activities up to date. This provides a dynamic and up-to-date account of the Master Gardener Program's outreach efforts.
 
In recent years, accountability to funding sources has become crucial. Documentation of volunteer hours, types of volunteer activities, and number of contacts is essential to monitoring program impact and directly impacts funding at both the state and county level. A sample volunteer activity log sheet is included in Appendix D.1.
 
Supporting Appendix
 
·         Appendix D.1. Volunteer Log Sheet

Background History Checks for Volunteers

In 2008, OAR 580-023 was adopted. This statue governs Criminal Background Checks for agents of the Oregon University System, including faculty, staff and volunteers working on behalf of Oregon State University as part of the OSU Extension Master Gardener Program.

Beginning in 2009, OSU adopted the statute instituted mandatory criminal records checks on all persons who are in a critical or security-sensitive position. These positions includes those jobs listed in (a) - (g), below.

(a) Has direct access to persons under 18 years of age or to student residence facilities because the person’s work duties require the person to be present in the residence facility;

(b) Is providing information technology services and has control over, or access to, information technology systems that would allow the person to harm the information technology systems or the information contained in the systems;

(c) Has access to information, the disclosure of which is prohibited by state or federal laws, rules or regulations or information that is defined as confidential under state or federal laws, rules or regulations;

(d) Has access to property where chemicals, hazardous materials and other items controlled by state or federal laws or regulations are located;

(e) Has access to laboratories, nuclear facilities or utility plants to which access is restricted in order to protect the health or safety of the public

(f) Has fiscal, financial aid, payroll or purchasing responsibilities as one of the person’s primary responsibilities; or

(g) Has access to personal information about employees or members of the public including Social Security numbers, dates of birth, driver license numbers, medical information, personal financial information or criminal background information.

Master Gardener volunteers are most likely to qualify as being in a critical or security-sensitive position if they work with youth (a) or if they drive on behalf of the University, as part of their volunteer assignment.

None of our volunteers has fiscal or financial responsibilities as their primary duties (f). Nor should our volunteers have access to social security numbers, dates of birth, drivers license numbers, etc. of faculty, staff, fellow volunteers or clients (g).

Those volunteers that also serve as their OMGA chapter treasurer or the OMGA treasurer have fiscal and financial responsibilities for the OMGA, and not for OSU Extension. Similarly, those volunteers that handle money for plant sales are doing so for the Association, and not for Extension. Thus, category ‘f’ does not apply in these cases.

All volunteers who will work with youth or who drive on behalf of the University, as part of their work as an OSU Extension Master Gardener, are thus required to undergo a volunteer background check.  Volunteers are assigned these tasks (e.g. working with youth or driving on behalf of OSU) if they have these tasks checked off of their Volunteer Position Description.

The University Policy on Background history checks may be found at:

Extension Service volunteers should complete and return the form to their county Extension office in a sealed envelope. Somewhere on the envelope, volunteers should indicate the county to which they are applying. The sealed envelope will be forwarded directly to the OSU Office of Human Resources for processing. A representative from OSU HR will contact (usually by phone) a designated person within the county Extension office who is authorized to receive the results of the background history check. Please check with your county Extension office manager to find out who the designated person is within your office, or to see if you can be placed on the list of people who are authorized to receive the results of volunteers’ background history checks.

Supporting Appendices

Use of the OSU Extension Master Gardener™ Title and Logos

Using the OSU and OSU Master Gardener Program logo is an important concept to introduce early in the program. An understanding that these terms are licensed by Oregon State University provides valuable orientation that the program is truly a part of OSU Extension, and volunteer participation and earning the title of “OSU Extension Master Gardener” is truly part of the overall University strategy for public outreach.

The title Master GardenerTM and the flower shaped logo were registered as trademarks of Oregon State University on March 8, 2001. They were reregistered in March 2011. Also trademarked are the words:

  • Oregon Master Gardener™
  • Master Gardener™ (when used in Oregon)
  • Oregon State University Master Gardener™
  • Oregon State University Extension Service Master Gardener™
  • Oregon State University Master Gardener Mini-College™

Anywhere “Master Gardener™” is used, the trademark should be part of the text. Examples include:

  • Jackson County Master Gardener™
  • Central Oregon Master Gardener™ Association
  • OSU Extension Master Gardener™

Technically a TM should be shown after all of these phrases. It is also appropriate in print media (like this manual) to use the TM after the first time Master Gardener appears on a page and not subsequently in the text. If the flower logo is used, then the words ‘Oregon Master Gardener™’, ‘Oregon State University Master Gardener™’, ‘Oregon State University Extension Service Master Gardener™’, etc. should also be used. It is not acceptable to use the flower logo, without also using a phrase that identifies the OSU Master Gardener™ Program. A TM should also be shown immediately below and to the right of the flower logo design. (See Appendix F for camera-ready versions of the logo.) Electronic versions are available from the State Coordinator. The flower logo is a symbol for the OSU Master Gardener Program, and not the Oregon Master Gardener Association or any of its chapters.

You, as the Extension staff member managing the Master Gardener program in a particular county, have the responsibility of deciding when and how the logo and name will be used. If you have questions you can contact the State Coordinator for clarification. At the county level, OMGA chapters may show the logo if it is used in conjunction with a project in support of the overall OSU Extension Master Gardener Program. The key is the acknowledgement of OSU and the Master Gardener Program.

The flower shaped logo is often used by the local chapter of the OMGA on various items. The use of the logo on t-shirts, cards, aprons, mugs, displays, plant sale advertising, bookmarks, and other similar uses is perfectly appropriate, but in all cases the specific use of the logo should be approved in advance by the faculty or program assistant in the county to assure that it is used in an appropriate context.

The words ‘Master Gardener’ are often used by the OMGA and OMGA chapters when advertising events and fundraisers. If the words ‘Master Gardener’ are included in the name of an event or are used to promote events and fundraisers (even if the words are used as part of an OMGA chapter name, such as ‘Benton County Master Gardener Association), the event must be reviewed and approved in advance by local OSU Extension Master Gardener Program faculty/staff/coordinators. In addition, all promotional materials, including advertisements and press releases, are subject to review by OSU Extension Master Gardener Program Faculty and Staff.

If an event has not been reviewed and approved, and/or if materials are produced without review by MG Program Faculty/Staff/Coordinators, individuals who volunteer to work on the associated event may not be eligible to receive Master Gardener Program volunteer service hours. Furthermore, individuals who volunteer to work on an event that makes use of the words ‘Master Gardener’, but has not been reviewed and approved by MG Program Faculty/Staff/Coordinators, may not be covered by OSU liability insurance. If there is no OSU oversight for an event, then OSU liability insurance does not apply.

The following guidelines apply to the OSU Extension Master Gardener Program, as well as the OMGA and its chapters.

When producing materials that advertise or promote fundraisers, not educational in nature, the phrase ‘In support of the OSU Extension Master Gardener Program’ should appear the materials, in no less than 10 point font.

Materials printed for fundraisers, educational in nature, should state ‘in collaboration with and in support of the OSU Extension Master Gardener Program’, in no less than 10 point font. For these events, published materials must also include the Non-Discrimination Statement (http://extension.oregonstate.edu/eesc/how-to/nondiscrimination-english-a...), to meet USDA civil rights requirements.

Educational Programs should always be conducted in collaboration with OSU. Thus, materials printed for educational programs should state ‘in collaboration with the OSU Extension Master Gardener Program’, in no less than 10 point font for standard 8X10" sheets of paper.  For banners, posters and other large format materials, font size and display should be determined in cooperation with the local Master Gardener coordinator. For all educational events, published materials must include the Non-Discrimination Statement (http://extension.oregonstate.edu/eesc/how-to/nondiscrimination-english-a...), to meet USDA civil rights requirements.

The OSU Extension logo must be used on all goods, wall hangings, banners, posters, paper, clothing, advertising and educational materials used in conjunction with the Master Gardener Program. For more information on the OSU Extension logo, licensing and trademarks go to the following website: http://oregonstate.edu/marketing/trademark/

The Master Gardener Program, OMGA and its chapters must adhere to the OSU minimum size and clear space requirements, when using the OSU, OSU Extension and/or OSU Extension Master Gardener Program logo(s). A downloadable copy of OSU Extension logos can be found at the OSU Extension website. You must be on an OSU computer in order to access the OSU Extension logo. Both color and black and white forms are available. Use of this and any other logo should be reviewed and approved by the Master Gardener Program staff in the county.

The URLs to access the downloadable logos are listed below:

For those who can’t access the logos at this website (i.e. those who aren’t OSU employees or do not have OSU computers), please contact OSU Extension Marketing. The Extension Marketing staff will ask who would like to use the logo and how they intend to use the logo. If the use is within the parameters of the OSU Extension Marketing policies, the Extension Marking staff can e-mail the logo in electronic form. 

Supporting Appendices

Volunteer transfers from other counties or from out of state

It is not unusual for OSU Extension volunteers to complete their training and/or volunteer service in one Oregon county, and then move to another county within Oregon.  Similarly, it is not unusal for Extension Master Gardener volunteers to move to Oregon, after completing their service and/or volunteer service hours in another state. 

Transferees from Oregon counties or from other states with active Master Gardener Programs should be accepted into local OSU Extension Master Gardener Programs, if the transferee is in good standing with their previous Master Gardener Program.  Prior to accepting the volunteer into your local program, you should make sure that they are a volunteer in good standing and that they have all required forms on file.  Check with their previous MG supervisor to ensure that they are in good standing.  Make sure that their required forms are up to date (if they transferred from another Oregon county), or have them fill out required forms (if they transferred from out of state).

You may also want to require that the volunteer re-certify as a Master Gardener in their new, local program.  You can do this by providing them with a comprehensive test, that focuses on core concepts and local conditions.  Alternatively, you can require the volunteer to attend a set of core classes during the annual Master Gardener training sessions.  These options are not mutally exclusive.  Depending upon local needs, you may require the transferee to satisfy both options, prior to working at an Extension Master Gardener Plant Clinic.

Political Action Committees

Because state budget laws as interpreted by the courts prohibit the use of public funds and public resources for political activity, Extension Service personnel are not permitted to lobby in support of funding for Extension or other University Programs without prior approval. Furthermore, because the Oregon University System employs a lobbyist, University personnel must report all time spent lobbying for legislative support. Extension employees must submit a report quarterly to Extension Administration. If more than 24 hours or $100 is spent lobbying by a University employee within a quarter, the University employee must register and file other reports with the Government Standards and Practices Committee.
 
Because of restrictions placed on Extension Service personnel regarding lobbying, and the importance of fostering and enhancing legislative support for Extension in local governments, Extension volunteers have stepped forward to organize lobby for Extension services in several counties. Specifically, Master Gardeners have been integral and effective members of the Political Action Committee (PAC) that has helped to lobby for and secure tax service districts in Polk, Linn, Clackamas and Douglas County.
 
For more information on OSU Extension’s guidelines for political activity and the establishment of Service Districts, please refer to the Extension Administration Homepage.
 
Supporting Documents

Plant Clinic Procedures

In most counties, Master Gardeners staff Plant Clinic phone lines and desks at county Extension offices. Many counties also offer Plant Clinics in their communities, at farmers’ markets, fairs and commercial businesses. Plant Clinics are a valuable service to the community, where Oregonians can ask questions about their home or community garden. Those who utilize the services of a Master Gardener Plant Clinic are often referred to as our ‘clients’. To ensure high quality answers to questions received at Master Gardener Plant Clinics, it is important that volunteers are trained to recognize and utilize appropriate resources and to consult with OSU Extension faculty and/or expert Master Gardeners, as needed. Appropriate resources include the Pacific Northwest Weed, Insect and Disease Management Handbooks; peer-reviewed journal articles, Extension publications, brochures and hand-outs; eXtension and/or university Extension websites; online materials produces by eXtension and/or university Extension Services; and other resources that contain validated, research-based content. In addition, to utilizing county Extension faculty and expert Master Gardeners, on campus resources (e.g. OSU Plant Clinic; OSU Herbarium, Oregon State Arthropod Collection), Extension specialists, and other OSU faculty should be consulted when needed.

Master Gardener volunteers should utilize these resources to provide research based information to those seeking information or advice on home and/or community gardening. Master Gardener volunteers are not permitted to answer questions for commercial growers, or questions related to commercial production..  Master Gardeners are not permitted to answer questions or provide recommendations related to pasture management, although Master Gardeners can work to identify weeds (using appropriate resources) that were growing in pasture.  Master Gardeners are not permitted to identify mushrooms, unless working with a verified mycological expert.  County-based Extension Agents determine who qualifies as a local mycological expert. 

Limits on Advice that Has Implications on Human Health:  Occasionally, a client may submit a sample to or seek advice from the Master Gardener Plant Clinic that could have implications for human health. Examples include: bed bugs, spiders, suspected arthropod-caused skin lesions, pesticide poisoning, poisonous plants, etc. If this is the case, it is important to remember that Master Gardener volunteers are not permitted to offer medical evaluations, diagnoses or advice on treatment. Instead, the client should be referred to a trained professional for these services. Master Gardener volunteers are permitted to utilize appropriate resources to identify a plant or arthropod sample (e.g. bed bugs, poison ivy) – but not lesions, rashes or other symptoms that may have been caused by a plant or an arthropod (e.g. the bite marks or rash that could be caused by bed bugs or poison ivy). OSU Extension faculty staff and volunteers should refer all clients seeking advice on managing any potential life/safety situations to medical or other trained professionals.

Identifying Potentially Poisonous Plants:  Often, the samples that are submitted to Plant Clinic make it difficult to confidently arrive at an accurate identification. For example, the client may submit only a small portion plant foliage, or may submit a crushed arthropod sample between two pieces of tape. If this is the case, and especially for those cases where the identity of the plant or arthropod could have implications to human health (i.e. a doctor would treat a patient who ingested a non-poisonous plant different than they would a patient who ingested a poisonous plant), it is important to use appropriate language when communicating findings to a client. An example of appropriate language is: “Based upon the information provided to OSU Extension and from the research conducted, it appears that this plant is a XXXXXX plant, which is listed as not poisonous.”

Marijuana Policy:  Oregon State University and the Oregon State University Extension Master Gardener program are recipients of federal funding.  Oregon State University and the Oregon State University Extension Master Gardener program are also governed by the federal Controlled Substances Act, the Drug-Free Workplace Act and the Drug Free Schools and Communities Act.  Thus, to guard against risk of losing Federal funding and to adhere to the federal laws that govern our activities, OSU Extension Faculty, Staff and Volunteers do not provide advice or referrals on the culture, care and/or use of marijuana.

Master Gardener volunteers working in the Plant Clinic should be provided with continuing education and support, to ensure that they are current on information, understand appropriate resource use, recognize when they should seek additional help or support, and know that it is more important to accurately say ‘we can’t answer that question’ (for whatever reason – not enough plant material, sample to crushed to identify, no research based resources on the topic) than to provide an incorrect answer.

Annual Timeline for the OSU Master Gardener Program

This table lists the approximate annual deadlines and events associated with the OSU Master Gardener Program, at the state and county level.
 
Month
Statewide MG Program
County MG Programs
January
·    Annual Report Submitted to the University
·    Travel to County Master Gardener Trainings
·    Online Master Gardener Course
·    Master Gardener Training
February
·    Travel to County Master Gardener Trainings
·    Online Master Gardener Course
·    Nominations solicited for Search for Excellence
·    Master Gardener Training
·    Order Badges for new trainees (at least one month prior to when you handout badges) from Lee Ann Julson
March
·    Travel to County Master Gardener Trainings
·    Online Master Gardener Course
·    PNW Handbooks Ordered for County Offices (Handled by the OMGA)
Nominations solicited for awards:
County Master Gardeners of the Year
Statewide Master Gardener of the Year
Statewide Master Gardener Behind the Scenes
·    Master Gardener Training
·    Prepare recertification test for veterans
April
·    Home Horticulture Working Group Meeting at Extension Spring Training
·    Nominations forms are due for Search for Excellence
·    Generate lists of trainees for different event coordinators
·    Recertification Training Class for veterans (Sat/Evening)
May
·    Nomination forms are due for awards (County MG of the Year, Statewide MG of the Year, Behind the Scenes Award)
·    Review the previous year’s classes with veteran Master Gardeners
·    Create recertification certificates
June
·    Update and revise online Master Gardener Course
·   
July
·    Gardener’s Mini-College (late July or early August)
·    Home Horticulture Working Group Meeting at Mini-College
·    Update Local Manual
August
·    Call for Update of Speakers’ Expertise and Geographical Area for Master Gardener Training
·    Applications available at Extension Office and all MG events
·    Press Releases about MG Training and Program
September
·    Order completion/appreciation certificates from Lee Ann Julson
·    Recruit Speakers for Master Gardener Training
·    Media contact for class recruitment
October
·    Call for Annual Report Data
·    Call for Number of Online-Trained Master Gardener Volunteers that Counties can Accept
·    Interview prospective class members
·    Recruit veterans for mentor, class coordinator and hospitality roles
·    Start collecting volunteer hours/data for annual report
November
·    SOARS reporting is due
·    SOARS reporting is due
·    Welcoming letters & local manual to new class members
·    Order Sustainable Gardening Handbooks
·    Recertification class for veterans (Sat/Evening)
December
·    Annual Report Data Due
·    Home Horticulture Working Group Meeting at Outreach and Engagement Conference
·    Training(s) for mentors and class coordinators
·    Make badges for new class
·    Prepare/print handouts
·    Create recertification certificates
 
 
 
The safety of the Master Gardener volunteers and Extension clientele is an important issue. The Master Gardener Position Description and the Pest Control Recommendation Agreement provide guidelines regarding pest management recommendations. Practicing the guidelines set forth in these documents will go a long way to reduce safety risks and abuse in the Master Gardener Program.
 
There are four basic categories where Master Gardeners can and should have insurance coverage. They are:
 
  1. Liability insurance when acting in their official capacity as Extension volunteers; (provided for Master Gardeners automatically as an ‘agent/employee’ of the university);
  2. Injury insurance when acting in their official capacity as Extension volunteers;
  3. Liability insurance when participating in Association related/sponsored events not co-sponsored by Extension; (this is where individual Chapter insurance polices come in);
  4. Injury insurance when participating in Association related/sponsored events not co-sponsored by Extension; (this is also where a Chapter policy would provide coverage).
 
Personal liability insurance for Extension volunteers is offered to the counties by OSU Extension Administration through the State of Oregon. Registered volunteers are provided protection for a personal injury or a property damage liability claim arising out of the performance of the volunteers' duties. This coverage is in excess of, and non-contributing with any other valid and collectible insurance the volunteer may have. This means that any personal insurance coverage the volunteer has would be used first to satisfy any judgments. Complete information about this policy is available through the State of Oregon Department of Administrative Services Risk Management Division. The policy is called Liability Self-Insurance (125-7-201) and the policy manual is available online at http://risk.das.state.or.us/liabili2 or from the Risk Management office on campus at Oregon State University.
 
All volunteers must agree to the Conditions of Volunteer Service (see Appendix A.5), and have the form filled out, signed and on file before they volunteer.
 
Supporting Appendices

Dismissing a Volunteer

Dismissing a volunteer can be a difficult and emotion-laden decision, but the process is fairly simple and has been used with both OSU Extension volunteers and volunteers in many other organizations. The procedure involves writing a letter that states that the services of the volunteer are no longer needed. You may choose to use a sentence such as:
 
 “This is to inform you that effective immediately, and in the best interest of the XXX County Master Gardener Program and XXX County Master Gardener Association, your services as a volunteer to both groups are no longer needed. Thank you (Signature).” 
 
Checking with the University’s legal counsel before sending the letter is always advised. 
 
Resources / References for Coordinators Considering Dismissing a Volunteer

Master Gardener Volunteers and School Garden Programs

All Extension volunteers who will work with youth as part of an Extension Program, must undergo a background history check prior to working on a youth-centered project.  Examples of projects that would require a background history check are:
 
  • work in school garden or other youth garden
  • work with children in a classroom or other educational site, as part of a one time or continuing gardening education program
  • work with children participating in a Junior Master Gardener program

Extension volunteers who participate in an Extension project, where youth may be present - but the focus of the project is not on youth education (i.e. a mobile Plant Clinic at a farmer's market or county fair) are not required to undergo a background history check.  Only those volunteers who will specifically be working with youth as part of their volunteer service need to undergo the background history check.

Volunteers who will be working with youth should fill out a Background History Check Form.  The form should be filled out and mailed directly to OSU HR, by the volunteer.  The address of OSU HR can be found on the background history check form (bottom of the second page).  OSU HR will call the Extension office that will be overseeign the volunteer's service, and will let the designated office representative know whether the volunteer is cleared for service projects that involve youth. 

Supporting Appendices

Lettuce Grow Sustainable Gardening Classes

Lettuce Grow is the non-profit organization that teaches sustainable gardening classes to Department of Corrections and Oregon Youth Authority students, using OSU Extension’s Master Gardener curriculum or the Oregon Food Bank’s Seed to Supper curriculum. 

Lettuce Grow uses the Master Gardener curriculum, but the class is called ‘Sustainable Gardening’.  The final exam is called a ‘Sustainable Gardening Final Exam’, and all questions related to the Master Gardener Program have been stricken from the final.  Module 12, which is about the Oregon Master Gardener Program (intended to teach current volunteers) is not part of the curriculum delivered to Lettuce Grow students. 

Lettuce Grow and the Master Gardener Program have a mutually agreeable policy regarding the use of the OSU Extension Master Gardener Curriculum.  Lettuce Grow can use the curriculum, but will call it by its more appropriate name: a sustainable gardening class, resulting in a certificate of home horticulture.  The term “Master Gardener” can not be used when advertising or promoting Lettuce Grow programs, or recruiting Lettuce Grow students, volunteers or other participants.

The reasoning behind this is that the term “Master Gardener," is a service-marked term that has very precise definitions at Oregon State University and within the Master Gardener community.  The resulting terminology confusion is difficult to manage.  This policy is intended to clarify things.

In addition, students participating in Lettuce Grow Sustainable Gardening classes are to be provided an orientation letter, to help further clarify the objectives of the course and how it relates to the OSU Extension Master Gardener Program.

Supporting Document

 

 The Oregon Master Gardener Association and its Chapters

 

Brief History of the Oregon Master GardenerTM Association (OMGA)

In 1982 Extension suffered a serious budget setback with a consequent layoff and changing of duties of most of the agents and faculty who were managing the Oregon Master Gardener Program. Of the 4 agents with major responsibilities in the program, one moved to another state, two were transferred to other duties and only one remained. Master Gardeners felt they would be more successful in protecting the program through a unified voice.
 
An organizational meeting was hosted by the Portland metro counties Home Horticulture Advisory Committee, November 13, 1982 at Mt. Hood Community College in Gresham. It was attended by 85 Master Gardeners from 10 counties. John Caine from Multnomah County and Chair of the Home Horticulture Advisory Committee opened the meeting and explained its purpose, "to organize a statewide association to assist, encourage, and help to direct Extension Service efforts in home horticulture and specifically in the workings of the Master Gardener Program". After several hours of discussion, a motion was made and seconded and the majority voted to form a state Master Gardener association (OMGA).
 
The need for a Master Gardener Foundation was discussed by Don Naylor from Multnomah County and Jim Dunn, executive secretary of the OSU Foundation. The foundation was felt necessary as a money raising body to help support Master Gardener Programs in counties where budgets were cut severely. A motion was made and seconded and the majority voted in favor of forming the Oregon Master Gardener Foundation (OMGF). Thus, because of Oregon's budget problems, Master Gardeners came together to form an association through which they could provide support to their program. Articles of incorporation were developed and signed April 1, 1985. On June 26, 1985, the State of Oregon Department of Commerce Corporation Division issued a Certificate of Incorporation of the OMGA.
 
On December 16, 1986 a meeting of OMGF officers and trustees was called to discuss dissolving the foundation At that time, the OMGF account held $5600. It was decided to make a gift of the cash assets to OMGA, contingent on satisfactory resolution of the tax- exempt status of OMGA. It was also suggested that OMGA elect a second Vice President to assume some of the duties of OMGF.
 
In June, 1985 a set of bylaws was agreed upon by officers and chapter representatives. They have been extensively revised twice, with several minor revisions but keeping the same mission and purpose. Since then, all OMGA chapters have used the state bylaws to formulate chapter bylaws. On February 18, 1988, the OMGA sent a memo to all chapters giving them the OMGA tax number for fund raising and soliciting contributions, and saying that OMGA would file a single consolidated tax return for all Oregon Master Gardener activity. In 2001 the organization structure of OMGA was modified slightly and now each individual chapter has its own tax ID number.
 
Since its beginning in 1982, OMGA has co-sponsored with OSU Extension Service, the annual Gardener’s Mini-College, the 2nd National Master Gardener Conference in 1989, and the first Western Regional Master Gardener Conference in 1994. The OMGA sponsors a newsletter three times per year for members, awards annual grants to chapters and county programs, and a scholarship to an OSU Horticulture student.
 

Current Role of the Oregon Master Gardener™ Association (OMGA)

The Oregon Master Gardener™ Association is a statewide, 501(c)(3) non-profit organization whose purpose is to enhance and support the OSU Master Gardener™ program. The county Master Gardener chapters together make up the state association. OMGA Board of Directors is comprised of representatives of each of the county chapters, as well as state officers. Quarterly OMGA meetings are held at various locations around the state.
 
Initially, the primary role of OMGA was summarized in five mission statements:
 
  • To enhance and supplement the Oregon State University Community Horticulture Program.
  • To assume responsibility for performing special tasks and engaging in continuous activities related to the program.
  • To promote a wide dissemination to Oregon citizens of information available as a result of University study and experimentation. Such information shall be in accordance with Oregon State University standards.
  • To work with other garden organizations to enhance gardening when appropriate.
  • To award scholarships for post-secondary education in the fields of horticulture and plant sciences on the basis of scholastic merit and need.
The OMGA went through a strategic planning process, initiated in 2010, that resulted in a revised mission.  The mission statement, listed below, received broad support from the OMGA Board at meetings in 2010 and 2011:
 
We are committed to Sustainable Gardening through:
  • Partnering with the OSU Master Gardener Program to promote sustainable gardening practices;
  • Advocating for funding to deliver the Master Gardener Program across Oregon; and
  • Fostering continuing education of all Master Gardeners.
Fun sustains our energy in carrying out these commitments.
 
The individual OMGA Chapters support this mission by assisting in the continuing education of Master Gardeners, by providing educational programs to members at monthly meetings and organizing other education events such as educational symposia, garden tours, and nursery visits. OMGA chapters also serve as a social center for Master Gardeners, and as a clearing house for projects and planning of OSU sanctioned educational outreach programs. The community service that the county chapters provide for their local citizens provides a public recognition of the OSU Extension Service Master Gardener Program.
 
The OMGA provides a forum for giving recognition to successful programs and to outstanding Master Gardeners, both statewide and locally. Annually, through the chapters and Extension Master Gardener Program staff, recognition is given for county Master Gardener of the year, for a state Master Gardener of the year, State "Behind the Scenes" Master Gardener of the year and Certificates of Appreciation are issued to those who have given of themselves to help the local chapter or the state association.
 

Relationship between Program and Master Gardener™ Associations

The relationship between the Master Gardener Program and the statewide and county Master Gardener Associations (sometimes called ‘chapters’) can be indistinct and at times ill defined. When a decision is related to the Master Gardener Program, you need to be clear with the Master Gardener Association that the final decision is yours.
 
In some cases the chapter takes on and manages projects, programs or activities that are the responsibility of the Extension Master Gardener Program staff. This may be because a county has been without program staff to manage the program at some point and Master Gardener volunteers stepped up to keep the program functioning. Or, it may be that some Master Gardener Program staff has turned over some of these responsibilities because of their management style or need to delegate due to other time commitments associated with their job.
 
In any event, it can be difficult at times to clarify the roles of the Master Gardener Program and the Association. Asking yourself some questions related to the project in question might help you define the different roles. For example:
 
  • Is it educational?
    • Examples: Annual training; school or community outreach where Master Gardeners will be in a ‘teaching’ role, organizing horticultural seminars for the local community.
  • Is the main purpose to disseminate researched-based information?
    • Examples: plant clinic in the office or at an off-site location, providing soil pH tests.
  • Is it related to volunteer hours (payback) for the program?
    • Examples: Will the hours count toward fulfillment of the initial volunteer commitment? Will the hours count toward recertification?
 
All of the examples listed above are program related and are areas that should be decided on by you, as the Extension Program staff member. You may still want to involve Master Gardeners in the initial planning or implementation of these areas, but the ultimate decisions should reside with you.
 
The following table provides a general outline for the respective roles of the OSU Extension Master Gardener Program and the Oregon Master Gardener Association.  Often, an event hosted by a chapter can and will span multiple roles.  For example, an OMGA Chapter plant sale raises funds for the chapter, but is presented in a way that it is also an educational event for the community.  However, plant sales are listed under 'raise funds' as a way to emphasize that while chapters may hold a plant sale to raise funds, this is not a role or responsibility that can be taken on by a county Extension Program.  However, the county Extension Program can and should provide guidance on the educational programming that is inherent in many OMGA Chapter plant sales.
 
The roles and responsibilities of the OSU Extension Master Gardener Program and the Oregon Master Gardener Association.
OSU Extension Master Gardener Program OMGA Chapter
Develops and disseminates research-based and objective information/programs/curricula on sustainable gardening and community food production, via
  • Extension Publications
  • Plant Clinic at Extension office, fairs, farmer’s markets, etc.
  • School / Demonstration / Community Gardens
  • Youth Garden Programs
  • Annual Master Gardener training and recertification
  • And other means
Supports the OSU Home Horticulture (Master Gardener) Program at the Statewide and County level 
  • Endowment Gifts
  • McNeilan Scholarship and other Scholarships to OSU Students
  • Sponsors Mini-College
  • Purchase of PNW Handbooks for OR counties with an MG Program
  • Extension Educator Grant
  • Political Support for the Statewide and County Master Gardener Programs
Supports the OSU Home Horticulture (Master Gardener) Program at the Statewide and County level 
  • Endowment Gifts
  • Political Support for the Statewide and County Master Gardener Programs
Administers the training and supervision of Master Gardener volunteers.
  • Insurance
  • Background Checks
  • Reporting
Raises Funds
  • Silent Auction at Mini-College
  • OSU Bookstore Sales Commission at Mini-College
Raises Funds
  • Plant Sales
  • Garden Tours
 

 

Supports OMGA Members and Chapters

  • Skills Development (Leadership Day at Mini-College)
  • Dialogue/Idea Exchange at OMGA meetings
  • Files IRS paperwork, financial reporting
  • Satisfy regulatory requirements for corporate documents & records such as bylaws and Articles of Incorporation.

Organizes educational and social events, locally

  • Speakers at monthly chapter meetings
  • Tours and outings
  • Potlucks
An individual becomes a Master Gardener through satisfactory completion of the training course and volunteer internship.  An individual becomes an OMGA member by paying dues to the OMGA and to their local chapter. An individual is a member of an OMGA chapter, by paying dues to the OMGA and to their local chapter.

 

Cooperation and Collaboration between Master Gardener™ Program staff and Master Gardener Associations

 
To acknowledge the length and depth of the collaboration, it is appropriate for both program staff and OMGA Chapter representatives to acknowledge and support each other in their public presence. Wording such as “the OMGA in cooperation with the Extension Service”, or “The County Extension office with the financial assistance of the OMGA Chapter” are phrases that should be used for collaborative projects and programs. Mutual support and acknowledgement will help keep the true nature of the relationship in perspective. Ideally all of the projects that an association takes on will be in line with the primary mission of OMGA, which as stated in their bylaws, is to enhance and supplement the OSU Master Gardener Program. Working closely with the Chapter Executive Board in an advisory role can provide you opportunity to help guide the group in some of their project selection.
 
Examples of projects or events the Chapter might undertake, and that would be appropriate for the Chapter to plan, organize and implement with minimal input from you include, but are not limited to:
  • The fundraising portion of a plant sale
  • The social portion of a garden tour or garden trip
  • The social portion of a chapter potluck and social
Please note that in the above cases, the OMGA Chapter must maintain its own liability insurance, as Oregon State University provides coverage only for educational events such as plant clinics and not for activities that are primarily fund-raising or social. Seldom is it ‘black and white’ as to what each group’s role should be. The key is to develop a collaborative relationship with the Chapter and help them help you achieve the mission of the OSU Extension Master Gardener Program.
 

Guidelines for OMGA Chapter Websites

The OMGA, in cooperation with, OSU Extension MG program developed website guidelines for Chapter use in 1999. Although these guidelines were developed over almost 2 decades ago, the most of the recommendations remain valid today.  A brief outline of the guidelines can be found below.  For a complete set of the guidelines, please contact:
 
Gail Langellotto
Master Gardener State Program Coordinator
4017 Ag and Life Sciences Bldg
Corvallis, Oregon 9733
541-737-5175 
 
Recommendation #1:  Statement of Purpose
  • Be very clear about the purpose of your website
  • Prepare a written purpose statement to guide website development and maintenance
    • Who is your audience?  The general public, chapter members, or both?
  • Get approval and support from the OMGA Chapter, as well as the county Extension faculty and staff that oversee the local Master Gardener Program
 
Recommendation #2:  Technical Guidelines
  • Select appropriate software and update as needed
  • Choose an appropriate location/server for the website
  • Examine privacy and security issues
  • Include contact information for site visitors
    • Chapter contact information for current members
    • Extension office contact information for members of the public
  • Ensure regular website updating and maintenance
 
Recommendation #3:  Content Guidelines
  • Determine the site's content objectives
  • Define the purpose and content of your home page, as well as other pages on the site
  • Consider a website with multiple pages for more information
  • Consider links to other websites
    • OSU Extension
    • OMGA
  • Include the OSU web disclaimer if the OMGA Chapter website is hosted on an OSU server
Recommendation #4:  Design/Editorial Guidelines
  • Style matters.  Research design ideas and plan the 'style' of your website
  • Keep all visitors in mind.  Test your website with several users, on several monitors, using several browsers, wtih several printers, before you release it to the public.

Hospitality Guidelines for Master Gardener Conferences and Seminars

Educational conferences and seminars are important venues for upholding the Master Gardener mission of educating people about sustainable gardening in the Pacific Northwest.  Each year, OMGA and its chapters host an array of conferences and seminars that collectively teach thousands of Oregonians about locally relevant and research-based sustainable gardening practices.

Integral to the success of a well-planned conference or seminar series are the invited speakers who serve as educators at these events.  Also important are the sponsors who donate funds to keep conference costs low, and the vendors who pay for a space to sell commercial goods or host an informational table.  As important as it is to ensure a high-quality experience for conference attendees, so too is it important to ensure that the speakers, sponsors and vendors at these event also have a positive experience.  These guidelines are intended to provide a framework for ensuring that all participants in a Master Gardener-hosted conference or seminar series have a positive experience.

  • Speakers:  One of the reasons that Master Gardener chapters are able to keep costs down at an educational conference or seminar series is because speakers are willing to teach at low or no cost to the host organization.  At a minimum, host organizations should make sure that any parking fees are covered for visiting speakers.  In addition, it is hospitable to extend an offer to attend other sessions within the conference, at least on the day that the speaker is teaching.  If the host organization has the financial means to do so, they should consider offering to cover the speakers mileage fees and/or providing a small honorarium.
  • Sponsors:  Occasionally, commercial businesses are approached to see if they will contribute funds to sponsor a Master Gardener conference.  In addition, not for profit community partners may choose to sponsor a Master Gardener conference, particularly if there is a shared mission between the organizations.  In the sponsorship agreement, MG chapters should specify how many individuals are invited to attend the conference, for free ~ as a show of appreciation of the sponsor's support.
  • Vendors:  Commercial vendors may be asked to pay a fee to sell their goods at a Master Gardener conference.  These folks benefit by being allowed to sell their goods to a targeted audience of gardeners.  However, community partners and non-profits are sometimes asked to pay a fee to staff a table at a Master Gardener conference.  Usually, the folks staffing a table for a non-profit are volunteering their time to extend information on their shared mission, to a Master Gardener audience.  In the vendor agreement, MG chapters should consider specifying how many individuals are invited to attend the conference, for free ~ as a show of appreciation of the partner's support.

Looking to the Future

The Extension Master Gardener Program has come a long way since its beginnings in Washington State in the early 70s. Here in Oregon, the Program is active in 30 of Oregon’s 36 counties and annually we train approximately 800-1,000 new volunteers.
 
There is strong support for the OSU Extension Master Gardener Program on the state-level from Extension Administration and a dedicated group of Extension faculty and program assistants from across the state that makes up the Community Horticulture Working Group. Additionally, there is significant county-based support. All this attests to a strong, vibrant and growing program.
 
 

 

Appendix A.1. A copy of the publicity brochure EM8723. You may access the latest version of this brochure, online, at: http://extension.oregonstate.edu/catalog/pdf/em/em8723.pdf. Additional copies may be ordered by contacting staff at OSU Extension and Experiment Station Communications (http://extension.oregonstate.edu/eesc/).

 

Appendix A.2. Contract and Reimbursement Agreement.

 
 
Your County Office Heading
With logos for OSU Extension Logo and Master Gardener Program
 
Master Gardener™ Program
 
 
OSU Extension Service/XXXX County Master Gardner
Contract and Reimbursement Agreement
 
Yes, I want to become a trained OSU/XXXX County Extension Service Volunteer Master Gardener (MG), and I shall attend the full series of classes, complete the final examination and agree to the following:
 
If I must drop out of the class for any reason after the second week or don’t pay back the 66 hours of volunteer time, I shall reimburse the OSU/XXXX County Extension Service at the rate of $40 per week of classes attended or $400 for the entire course.
 
I shall volunteer 66 hours of my time in volunteer service sharing and using this training. I realize that I shall not be a certified Master Gardener until I have finished a 40 hour apprenticeship of the on-the-job training, and then I shall serve 26 additional hours as a Certified Master Gardener. All 66 total hours must be completed by the first anniversary (April 20XX) of my anticipated graduation from the Master Gardener Training session.
 
Signature _________________________________________________________   Date ________________
 
 
Deadline: Day of week, Month Date, Year
 
 
 
 
We will endeavor to provide public accessibility to services, programs and activities for people with disabilities. If accommodation is needed to participate at any meeting, please contact the ADA Coordinator at the XXXX County office of OSU Extension Service at XXX-XXX-XXX at least two-weeks prior to the scheduled meeting time.
 
Oregon State University Extension Service offers educational programs, activities, and materials—without discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, national origin, age, marital status—as required by Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972, and Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973. Oregon State University Extension Service is an Equal Opportunity Employer.

 


Appendix A.5. Volunteer Injury Coverage (VIC).
Note: Please check the following website for updated form each year:

 


Appendix B.1. Sample News Release about OSU Master Gardener ProgramPlease modify this press release to meet the specific needs in your county.
 
 
Your County Office Heading
With logos for OSU Extension Logo and Master Gardener Program
 
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
 
 

 

CONTACT: OSU/XXX COUNTY EXTENSION SERVICE (Contact Person) phone #
Date: Month, Day, Year
OSU/XXXX County Extension Service Master Gardener Program
 
Now is the time to apply for the OSU/XXXX County Extension Service Master Gardener Program, one of the most population volunteer programs in Oregon. Applications are available online at (URL) or from the XXXX County Extension office. Applications are due back to the XXXX Extension office by TIME on Month, Day, Year. Volunteers receive XX hours of intensive gardening education in exchange for XX hours of volunteer time.
 
The Master Gardener curriculum provides the volunteer with information and references on subjects such as botany, soil management, integrated pest management, and more. Upon completion of the course, Master Gardeners volunteer their time as an Extension educator, in coordination with plans developed by Extension Faculty. Community needs as well as the capabilities of the individual Master Gardener determine how this is best accomplished. Master Gardeners conduct garden clinics, teach basic gardening classes, with with 4-H and school groups and answer questions about all aspects of home gardening.
 
Commercial growers and those not albe to serve as a Master Gardener volunteer are invited to apply for the program, as well. There will be an additional cost to those who complete the course, but are not able to volunteer their time.
 
For more information, contact the OSU/XXXX County Extension Service office at Phone #, or stop by the office at address. 
 
 
 
 
 
 
We endeavor to provide public accessibility to services, programs and activities for people with disabilities. If accomodation is needed to participate at any meeting, please contact the ADA Coordinator at the XX County Extension office at Phone # at least two weeks prior to the scheduled meeting time.
 
Oregon State University Extension Service offers educational programs, activities, and materials without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, national origin, age, marital status, disability, and disabled veteran or Vietnam-era veteran status as required by Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, Title IX of theEducational Amendments of 1972, and Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973. Oregon State UniversityExtension Service is an Equal Opportunity Employer.
 
 

Appendix B.2. Sample Master Gardener Volunteer ApplicationPlease modify this application to meet the specific needs in your county.
 
 
Your County Office Heading
With logos for OSU Extension Logo and Master Gardener Program
 
MASTER GARDENER™ APPLICATION
Applications Due by: Month, Date Year
 
 
 
Name (please type or print): _________________________________________________
 
Mailing Address: _________________________________________________________
 
City: _____________________________   Zip: _________   Phone: _______________
 
E-mail: ___________________________ Cell Phone: ___________________________
 
Select one option below and check the appropriate box.
 
ð       I want to take the Master Gardener course of instruction AND volunteer the XX hours required by my county Extension office, en route to becoming a certified OSU Extension Master Gardener. The cost of this option is $XX, and includes the Master Gardener Handbook. I agree to pay XX County Extension $XXX if I do not satisfy my volunteer commitment, within 1 year of completing the course.
 
ð       I want to take the Master Gardener course of instruction and NOT volunteer any time for a cost of $XXX. This fee includes the Master Gardener Handbook, and does not require a volunteer commitment.
 
Please briefly answer the questions that follow.
 
How did you learn of the Master Gardener™ Program?
 
How many years of gardening experience do you have?
 
 
Please list any specialized garden-related training you have received.
 
 
What interests you and what do you expect to gain from the Master Gardener™ program?
 
Please list areas of specialization or hobbies (e.g. vegetables, greenhouses, roses, etc.)
 
 
 
Do you have gardening club or garden-related group affiliations? If so, what are they?
 
 
 
In what ways could you best contribute to the Master Gardener™ program? For example: teaching, 4-H and youth projects, senior projects, horticultural demonstrations, web page construction and maintenance, etc.
 
 
 
Please list volunteer activities in which you have participated within the last five years.
 
 
 
Please list one personal reference, include address and phone number.
 
 
 
Please list general days and times that you know you will not be available for volunteer service (vacation, job, and other regular commitments).
 
The following information is required on federal reports and affects funding. Ethnic data is required for institutional compliance with the Civil Rights Act of 1964. Please check the appropriate boxes.
 
ð       White, non-Hispanic
ð       Black or African American, non-Hispanic
ð       Hispanic
ð       Native American or Alaskan Native
ð       Asian or Pacific Islander
ð       More than one race
ð       Male
ð       Female
 
 
I certify that all the information given in this application is true, accurate and complete, to the best of my knowledge.
 
Signature: ________________________________________      Date: ______________________
 
Complete this application form and return it, by DATE, to:
ADDRESS
or, you may email this form to EMAIL
 
A letter of acceptance is required to enter the course as a Master Gardener trainee. Early application is encouraged as space is limited.
 
Oregon State University Extension Service offers educational programs, activities, and materials without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, national origin, age, marital status, disability, and disabled veteran or Vietnam-era veteran status as required by Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, Title IX of theEducational Amendments of 1972, and Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973. Oregon State UniversityExtension Service is an Equal Opportunity Employer.
 
 

Appendix B.3. Sample Interview QuestionsYou may modify these questions to meet the specific needs in your county. You may also want to ask prospective trainees to elaborate on their response to a particular question.
 
Have you previously had any affiliation with or participated in any OSU Extension programs or activities?
 
If yes, explain your participation and how/if you benefited from the program.
 
If no, what, if anything, do you know about OSU Extension and its programming?
 
How did you hear about the OSU Extension Master Gardener Program?
 
What about the program appeals to you most?
 
What kind of experience have you had working with and/or instructing diverse groups of people? Here, diversity can refer to diverse learning styles, personalities, ages, career and educational backgrounds, ethnicities and heritage, etc.
 
Are you comfortable answering questions over the phone and in person?
 
Occasionally, a caller or visitor to the office makes unreasonable demands on staff or volunteers, or takes up a lot of time just chatting. How would you deal with such a client?
 
Will you be able to attend all training sessions?
 
Will you be able to complete your XX hours of service by the end of October?
 
A client comes into the Master Gardener Plant clinic for advice on a plant problem that clearly requires a pesticide in order to save the plant. The client is not willing to sacrifice the plant, and is looking to you for advice. How do you feel about recommending pesticides to clients?
 
What has been your most memorable, important or unique gardening experience?
 
 
 

Appendix B.4. Sample Acceptance Letter.

 
 
Your County Office Heading
With logos for OSU Extension Logo and Master Gardener Program
 
 
Date
 
Dear ________________,
 
I am pleased to inform you that you have been accepted into the (year) OSU Extension Master GardenerTM training class in _________ County. Training begins (day, date, time) at (location). A map to (location) is enclosed.
 
If you wish to review the Master Gardener Training Handbook before the first class, you may pick up a copy at the Extension office during regular business hours. Otherwise, handbooks will be distributed on the first day of class.
 
Congratulations on your acceptance as an OSU Extension Master Gardener trainee! I hope you are looking forward to the learning opportunities and experiences that lie ahead.
 
Sincerely,
 
 
 

Appendix B.5. Sample Rejection Letter.

 
 
Your County Office Heading
With logos for OSU Extension Logo and Master Gardener Program
 
 
Date
 
Dear ________________,
 
I regret to inform you that we were not able to accept you into this year’s OSU Extension Master GardenerTM training class in _________ County. There were many more applicants than we are able to accommodate at this time. The caliber of all of the applicants was very high, and it was a difficult task to determine who the participants would be.
 
Your application will be kept on file, and you will be notified when we are ready to recruit for our next training session. The earliest possible training date will be one year from now.
 
Thank you for your interest in the OSU Extension Master Gardener Program. I look forward to your possible participation in our program in the future.
 
Sincerely,
 
 
 

Appendix B.6.  Master GardenerTM Position Description.

 
Insert Logos, OSU Extension (left) and Master Gardener Program Right
 
 
Oregon State University Extension Service Master GardenerTM
Position Description
 
 

Title: Oregon State University Extension Service Master Gardener™ Volunteer

Purpose: To provide OSU Extension Service educational programs on sustainable home horticulture (including vegetable, tree fruit, small fruit, lawn and landscape maintenance, pest control and associated topics) to the general public by using research based and unbiased information.

Brief description of the position
• Answers general public questions and inquiries about gardening, landscape maintenance, pest control and related topics by telephone; at clinics, demonstrations, workshops, or informal classes; or in other ways possible and practical.
• Cooperates with and assists local OSU Extension staff.
• May assist in preparation of specific educational resources.
• Keeps appropriate records.

Requirements
• Must be available to participate in the training program for Master Gardener volunteers.
• Must be available to provide volunteer service to OSU Extension during the year that training is completed, and equivalent to the number of hours of training received.
• Must be able to effectively communicate with the public by telephone, personal contact, group contact, or in writing.
• Must demonstrate a commitment to diversity and to ensuring equal opportunity for those wishing to benefit from OSU Extension programs and services.
• Should have some knowledge and skills in basic horticulture and related areas.
• Should enjoy working with people.

Supervision
• The county Extension agent with responsibility for the local Master Gardener program provides overall supervision and support.
• Immediate supervision and support may be provided by a program assistant or a program coordinator, if available.


Print Volunteer Name ______________________________________________

Volunteer Signature _______________________________________________ Date ______________


OSU Extension Faculty Signature ____________________________________ Date ______________

 
 
 

 
Insert Logos, OSU Extension (left) and Master Gardener Program Right
 
 
Oregon State University Extension Service Master GardenerTM Program
Policies Concerning the Use of the Title ‘OSU Master GardenerTM
 
 
The title OREGON STATE UNIVERSITY EXTENSION MASTER GARDENER™ is to be used only and exclusively in conjunction with activities associated with the Oregon State University Extension Master Gardener Volunteer Program.
 
I will identify myself as a “Master Gardener” only when engaged in unpaid public service in an Oregon State University Extension sponsored or approved program.
 
I will not appear as part of a commercial activity, have association with commercial products, or give implied Oregon State University or Oregon State University Extension endorsement of any product or place of business while serving as a Master Gardener Volunteer.
 
In such service, I will use only labeled or Oregon State University and Oregon State University Extension approved recommendations.
 
I can, however, include the title OREGON STATE UNIVERSITY EXTENSION MASTER GARDENER™ on a resume or job application, to signify that I have received training in home horticulture from OSU Extension.
 
I may also display my OREGON STATE UNIVERSITY EXTENSION MASTER GARDENER™ Certificate of Completion at my place of business or in my office, to signify that I have received training in home horticulture from OSU Extension.
 
 
I have read and understand the requirements dictating the use of the title OREGON STATE UNIVERSITY EXTENSION MASTER GARDENER™ and agree to abide by the rules, outline above.
 
Name _________________________________________________________________________
Address _________________________________________________________________________
City______________________________ State_______ ZIP____________ Phone_____________________
Signature____________________________________________________ Date_______________________
 
 
 

 
Insert Logos, OSU Extension (left) and Master Gardener Program Right
 
 
Oregon State University Extension Service Master Gardener
Pest Control Recommendation Agreement
 
Part of your work as an OSU Master Gardener is providing recommendations on managing pest problems. Those recommendations may include using pesticides to solve the problem. Misuse of pesticides can have adverse effects on the environment and on the personal safety of gardeners and their families. Inappropriate pesticide treatments are not a substitute for sound gardening practices. Alternative methods may be more appropriate for managing pests in home gardens.
 
Oregon State University, other land grant universities, and federal and state agencies focus substantial amounts of time and money toward developing agricultural pest management methods that rely less on the use of pesticides and more on an integrated approach to pest management. OSU Master Gardeners are encouraged to become familiar with the process of Integrated Pest Management, as it applies to the home, lawn and garden.
 
OSU Master Gardeners should explore all types of research-based information appropriate to their local conditions. Rather than being prescribed a particular solution, clients are given several possible methods to manage pest problems. These methods may include cultural, mechanical, biological, and chemical controls that are safe and effective. When giving recommendations, clarify the source of the information (e.g. Extension materials, research papers, or personal experience). The client determines which method to use.
 
You will receive training during your Master Gardener classes that will enable you to give recommendations that fit OSU Extension policy guidelines. This contract will serve as a formal basis for Master Gardener involvement in pest control recommendations.
 
1.      I understand that as a Master Gardener my pest control recommendations must be limited to home, lawn, and garden problems; questions concerning commercial crop production, commercial pest control, aquatic weed control, and pesticide liability are to be referred to the county Extension specialist.
 
2.      I understand that as a Master Gardener I may recommend a chemical for home and garden pest control only if that use has been recommended by OSU or other approved resources.
 
3.      I understand that as a Master Gardener I may recommend biological control organisms or other nonchemical alternatives for home and garden pest control only if the recommended use is contained in current OSU Extension publications or other publications recognized as credible by OSU scientists.
 
4.      I understand that as a Master Gardener I will provide a summary of effective and safe pest management recommendations, which may include nonchemical and chemical pest management options, allowing the client a choice of strategies.
 
5.      I understand that pesticides must be applied with care and only to plants, animals, or sites listed on the pesticide label and recommended by OSU. When mixing and applying pesticides, all label precautions must be followed to protect the applicator, other persons, and the environment. It is a violation of federal law to disregard label directions. If there is any apparent conflict between label directions and the pesticide uses suggested by OSU publications, the county Extension specialist must be consulted.
 
6.      I understand that as a Master Gardener I am not required to be a licensed pest control applicator or consultant to recommend pesticides registered for home and garden use.
 
7.      I understand that as a Master Gardener I am considered a volunteer representative of OSU. Therefore, OSU will assume liability for my pest control and pest management recommendations, but only if my recommendations are limited to control measures that are in accordance with the pesticide label and recommended by OSU for home and garden use.
 
Please check one of the following, sign, and return with your materials fee and application form.
 
____ Yes, as an OSU Master Gardener I will subscribe to the above requirements.
 
____ No, I cannot subscribe to the above policy, and I understand that I therefore cannot be certified as an OSU Master Gardener.
 
Printed name ___________________________________________
Signature_____________________________________________________     Date     _______________
 

 
Insert Logos, OSU Extension (left) and Master Gardener Program Right
 
Oregon State University Extension Service Master Gardener
Code of Conduct
(Reference Copy for Volunteer)
 
This Code of Conduct is a contractual agreement accepted by volunteers who commit to the Oregon State University Extension Master Gardener Program. The Code shall guide the volunteers’ behavior during their involvement with the Master Gardener Program.
 
The OSU Extension Master Gardener Program provides objective, research-based educational programs accessible to all Oregon residents. The primary purpose of this Code of Conduct is to ensure the safety and well-being of all Master Gardener Program participants (i.e. target audiences, professionals and volunteers).
 
Master Gardener volunteers are expected to function within the guidelines of Oregon State University Extension and the OSU Extension Master Gardener Program.
 
When volunteering as an Oregon State University Extension Master Gardener, I will:
 
·      Represent OSU Extension, the OSU Extension Master Gardener Program and my individual county program with professionalism, dignity and pride, and be responsible for conducting myself with courtesy and appropriate behavior.
·      Promote and support the activities and programs of OSU Extension, the OSU Extension Master Gardener Program and my local or county Master Gardener Program
·      Learn about, know and uphold the policies of the OSU Extension Service, the OSU Extension Master Gardener Program and my local or county Master Gardener Program
·      Participate in orientation and training programs to help me work more effectively with appropriate audiences
·      Comply with equal opportunity and anti-discrimination laws
·      Accept supervision and support from Extension faculty or staff while involved in the program
·      Keep personal opinions and actions separate from the research-based an objective recommendations made as a representative of this organization
·      Follow through and complete accepted tasks in a timely manner
·      Use garden tools and equipment and operate machinery, vehicles and other equipment in a responsible manner, when working in an OSU Extension Master Gardener demonstration garden or other Master Gardener site
·      Respect, adhere to and enforce the rules, policies and guidelines established by OSU Extension, the OSU Extension Master Gardener Program, and my local or county Extension Master Gardener Program.
·      Accept assignments suited to your personal interests and skills
·      Participate in staff and program evaluations
·      Be willing to use and teach research-based practices and concepts, in an objective manner
 
I have read and understand the Code of Conduct outlined above. I understand and agree that any action on my part that contradicts any portion of this Code is grounds for the suspension and/or termination of my volunteer status with the OSU Extension Master Gardener Program.
 
Printed name ___________________________________________
Signature_______________________________________________            Date    _______________
 
 

Appendix B.10.   Extension Photo Release. This release form can be accessed at the following
For a Spanish version at the following
 
 
 

 

 


Appendix B.12. Copy of the OSU Master Gardener Certificate of Completion. Blank certificates can be ordered from the OSU Extension Horticulture Office Specialist.

 
 

Appendix B.14. Copy of Extension Educator Peer Evaluation

 
Oregon State University
                                                                   Department of Horticulture
Non-credit Teaching Peer Evaluation Form
 
 
 
Presenter’s Name ____ _________________________                           Date ______ ______
 
Title/Topic __ ______           Invited Presentation: Yes __ ___   No _____
 
Event : ________________________
 
Audience _____ ____        Site ___ ____________
 
Were the site and presentation style or approach compatible (matched)?                                                Yes __ ___   No _____
 
Did the site or conditions present problems (e.g. poor public address system, nasty weather)? Yes _ ____   No _____
If yes, please describe:
 
 
Evaluator name and signature:
 
        Place an “X” or “checkmark” on the line after each question and provide additional comments or suggestions as appropriate. Send the original to the Department Head and a copy to the instructor. Talk with the instructor about observations if warranted.
 
 
Information Delivery
 
 
Yes
Improvement
Suggested
1. Did the presenter provide a(n) ___ overview ___ summary or ___ otherwise emphasize
     important points?
 
 
 
2. Was the information presented in a logical manner?
 
 
 
3. Was a clear message delivered?
     ___ Too much detail ___ Too little detail
 
 
 
4. Was the information presented relevant?
 
 
 
5. Was the information presented current?
 
 
 
6. Was the presenter technically knowledgeable?
 
 
 
7. Were problem-solving techniques or solutions provided, or emphasized, when appropriate?
 
 
 
8. Did the presenter use language that was appropriate for the participants?
 
 
 
 
 
Comments/suggestions (Please comment on any of the above and note any mannerisms that detracted from the presentation): 
Relating to the Participants
 
 
Yes
Improvement
Suggested
 9. Did the presenter relate the information to participants’ needs/interests?
 
 
 
10. Did the presenter encourage questions/discussion about the topic, when appropriate?
 
 
 
11. Were questions from participants effectively answered?
 
 
 
12. Did the presenter ask questions or use other methods to gauge the audience’s attention?
 
 
 
13. Did the presenter direct participants to other sources of information relating to the topic,
       when appropriate?
 
 
 
 
Comments/suggestions (Please comment on any of the above and presenter strengths):
 
 
Teaching Aids
 
 
Yes
Improvement
Suggested
14. Were teaching aids appropriate for the presentation?
 
 
 
15. Did the presenter use creative teaching aids to enhance the presentation?
 
 
 
16. Did the instructor use a variety of teaching and learning techniques in the presentation
       or activity?
 
 
 
17. Was the presentation format clear and understandable?
 
 
 
 
Comments/suggestions (Please comment on any of the above and presenter strengths):
 
 
 
Overall Teaching Ability
 
Please rate the presenter’s teaching and presenting skill on the following (1 = needs improvement, 3 = satisfactory, 5 = outstanding, NA = do not wish to give rating or feel it is not appropriate).
 
18. Overall rating of teacher’s performance?                  1              2              3              4              5              NA
 
 
Comments/suggestions:
Excellent instructor! Fabulous class!
 

 

Peer Evaluation Form Intent and Instructions
 
The Non-credit Teaching Peer Evaluation Form is intended to be used by OSU faculty members who have the opportunity to attend presentations, or to participate in comprehensive workshops or programs designed and delivered by members of the Horticulture faculty. Faculty may also give the form to other peers (faculty from other universities or peers from other county, state, or federal agencies) for their use in providing feedback to a faculty member. The form is not intended to be used for clientele assessments. 
 
The primary purpose of this form is to provide constructive comments about teaching and presentation skills. Where appropriate, suggestions for skill improvement are provided. In addition, it can be used to meet the peer evaluation requirements for annual performance evaluations (PROF) and promotion and tenure (P&T) processes.
 
You have the ability to change or customize the document for each presentation. If you want information not requested, insert questions on the topic. If you do not wish a numerical ranking be made, eliminate this portion of the form.
 
The departmental goals and use for the form are:
 
·          To provide feedback to colleagues so they can improve their presentation and program delivery skills—content, delivery, audience interaction, and appropriateness of teaching methods, including an assessment of learning
                                                              
·          To have peer evaluations in hand for P&T purposes which are required as part of the P&T process
 
·          To meet annual peer evaluation requirement (PROF) for county Extension faculty
 
 
 
 

Appendix B.15. Citizens Evaluation of Teaching (CET).
Please contact OSU Extension Administration for a supply of evaluation forms.
For a templates to print information on the CET form please go to the following URL:
 
 
 

Appendix B.16. Copy of Recertification ExamThis is a copy of the Master Gardener recertification test that was used in 2007 by Columbia County Program staff.

 
To be able to work a clinic table at Spring Fair, tests need to be returned to the Extension office in hard or electronic copy (chip.bubl@oregonstate.edu) by April 18th. You can turn them in later for summer/fall clinics or phone duty.
 
1. A client comes in asking for a soil test. What questions might you ask them to find out if a soil test is needed?
 
2. Name an abiotic problem you have experienced in your garden this past year or two over which you had some control. What did you or could you have done?
 
3. How would you know whether 300 pounds of fresh chicken manure would provide enough nitrogen for a 1200 square foot garden? Show your math and assumptions (like how much actual N is in fresh chicken manure and how much actual N is needed for the plot in question).
 
4. What is the most common reason raspberry plantings die in western Oregon? What are the most important cultural methods could be used to reduce the chance of them dying?
 
5. Name four reasons that carrots might not produce good quality roots.
 
6. What above-ground symptoms might a conifer dying from a root disease show? Describe the progression of the symptoms.
 
7. How much rain do we get (on average) in the months of July and August (note your location if not St. Helens/Scappoose)? How much water does the average garden or lawn use in those months?
 
8. Briefly compare and contrast the two kinds of termites we have in Columbia County. What are appropriate management strategies for them?
 
9. Cherry leaves are brought in that show somewhat circular holes in the leaves. What caused those holes, how serious are they and how could they be prevented?
 
10. A house was built on a parcel of land that had been previously covered with brush. The land was cleared and prepared for building. Once the house was occupied and the owners planted their landscape, many of the plants put in failed to thrive (in fact, many died). Why might this happen? What options do they have to develop a landscape?
 
11. How are seedlings that will be transplanted “hardened off” before planting them outside?
 
12. Why is particle size important in a compost pile?
 
13. What are some important differences in how sandy soils and clay loam soils are managed for vegetable production?
 
14. Describe briefly the steps needed to create a new garden bed.
 
15. Compare and contrast the symptoms of bacterial, fungal and viral plant diseases?
 
16. List five cultural weed control techniques you use in your garden.
 
17. Why should you always store pesticides in their original containers?
 
18. Name three soft-bodied insects found on plants in homes and greenhouses. Describe how they can be managed.
 
19. How does powdery mildew affect grape plants?
 
20. What management techniques/tools are appropriate for the home gardener?
 
21. Bronze birch borer is a relatively new pest for the area. Describe the damage and list some possible approaches the homeowner might use to grow birch trees.
 
Oregon State University Columbia County
Extension Service CEB:vk 3/07
 
 

Appendix B.17. Certificates of Recertification for Veteran Master Gardeners.

 
 

Appendix B.18. Re-Application/Transfer Form

 
 
Your County Office Heading
With logos for OSU Extension Logo and Master Gardener Program
 
Master Gardener™ Program
 
OSU Extension Service/XXXX County Master Gardner
Reapplication/Transfer form
 
Name _________________________________________________________________________________
Address _______________________________________________________________________________
City _______________________________________________ State _____________   Zip_____________
Phone ______________________________________   Fax ____________________________________
Email ________________________________________________________________________________
Emergency contact Name ______________________ Phone ____________ Relationship_____________
Year you took MG training ______________________ Where_____________________________________
Years of Gardening Experience ____________________________________________________________
Please list any specialized garden related training you have received: _______________________________
_______________________________________________________________________________________
Do you need any special accommodations in order to participate in training or other program activities? _____
If yes, what? _________________________________________ Do you require handicapped parking? _____
 
Which of the following activities/programs are your interested in?
___ Recertification classes held weekdays ___ Weekend Recertification Classes
___ Open book recertification test
___ Do you have an OSU Extension Master Gardner Program badge?
___ Please order me a MG Program badge ($10.00) the badge will be mailed to as soon as your check is received.
 
Please list the Extension Agent/Coordinator of Master Gardner Program that supervised your training.
Name __________________________________________________________________________________
Address ________________________________________________________________________________
City _______________________________________________ State _____________   Zip______________
Phone ______________________________________   Fax _____________________________________
Email _________________________________________________________________________________
 
Ask applicants to list skills and 2 – 3 references you can contact.
 
 
 
 
 
We will endeavor to provide public accessibility to services, programs and activities for people with disabilities. If accommodation is needed to participate at any meeting, please contact the ADA Coordinator at the XXXX County office of OSU Extension Service at XXX-XXX-XXX at least two-weeks prior to the scheduled meeting time.
 
Oregon State University Extension Service offers educational programs, activities, and materials—without discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, national origin, age, marital status—as required by Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972, and Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973. Oregon State University Extension Service is an Equal Opportunity Employer.

 


 

 
 

Appendix B.20. Report of Accident/Illness Form.

This form should be used anytime an accident occurs at an OSU Extension event or site.  Volunteers, when working in their capacity as an OSU Extension volunteers, are considered agents of the University.  If a volunteer is hurt, when working for Extension, the volunteer's Extension supervisor should complete the form, and submit to OSU Human Resources.  If a visitor to an Extension event or program is hurt, the OSU employee notified of the accident should complete the form.
 
 

 
A template agreement that can be used as a starting point for agreements with landholders who own non-OSU property used for demonstration, learning, community gardens where official OSU Extension MG activities occur on a regular basis.  This form is not for gardens where MGs go to do a one time educational or outreach program, but is instead for gardens where MGs conduct regular programs or perform regular volunteer service.

The steps to using this form would be to:
  1. fill out the highlighted sections, as they apply to your county,
  2. take out the Statutory Authority, if it is not an intergovernmental agency agreement,
  3. send to the PACS office (http://pacs.oregonstate.edu/) for review and signatures.
 
AGREEMENT
FOR A DEMONSTRATION GARDEN PROJECT
 
This agreement, hereinafter referred to as “Agreement”, is made and entered into by and between __________________________ OWNER”*, and the State of Oregon acting by and through the State Board of Higher Education on behalf of Oregon State University for its ___________ Master Gardener Program, herein referred to as “OSU”.
 
    a. In accordance with and pursuant to the provisions of ORS Chapter 190, entitled “INTERGOVERNMENTAL COOPERATION”, OWNER is authorized to jointly provide for the performance of a function or activity in cooperation with a “unit of local government” that includes a commission or other governmental authority in Oregon. By acceptance of this Agreement, OSU certifies that it meets the above criteria for eligibility for such cooperation with OWNER.
 
    b. As a result of the Agreement and pursuant to ORS 190.030, any unit of local government, consolidated department, intergovernmental entity or administrative officers designated herein to perform specified functions or activities is vested with all powers, rights and duties relating to those functions and activities that are vested by law in each separate party to the Agreement, its officers and agencies.
 
 
2. RECTIAL
    a. OWNER owns property located at _________________________; and,
    b. OSU desires to use the property to create a demonstration garden that will be used for educational purposes.
 
3. COOPERATIVE SERVICES TO BE SHARED
    a.  OWNER agrees as follows:
         1) To allow the program to use and modify the specified property.
         2) To provide locate services for utilities upon request.
         3) To provide water and electricity for gardening activities.
         4) To provide assistance to ensure the success of the program.
         5) OWNER reserves the right to control access to property.
    b.  OSU agrees as follows:
         1)  Act as lead agency for implementing the program.
         2) Carry out tasks. Specifically OSU shall:
             A) Provide personnel to implement and operate the program.
             B) Prepare all program materials and supplies.
             C) Promote the program to the community in the county.
             D) Keep said property in an aesthetically pleasing and litter free state.
             E) Identify adequate funding for sustainability of program.
             F) Provide an annual report on the program to OWNER.
             G) Should OSU wish to discontinue the program it agrees to return the property to a condition acceptable to OWNER.
 
4. APPORTIONMENT FOR FUNDING
    a. OWNER shall not require any payment from OSU for the use of the property or water or electricity.
    b. OSU shall not require any payment from OWNER for the program.
 
5. INSURANCE
If either Party is not self-insured, then it shall maintain adequate and appropriate types of insurance coverage in amounts no less than state law requires for workers’ compensation, comprehensive general liability covering both bodily injury and property damage, and automobile liability covering both bodily injury and property damage. 
OWNER, its subcontractors, if any, and all employers working under this Agreement are subject employers under the Oregon Workers’ Compensation Law and shall comply with ORS 656.017, which requires them to provide workers’ compensation coverage for all their subject workers.
 
6. LIMITATIONS OF LIABILITY
All Parties agree that each Party shall not be subject to claim, action, or liability arising in any manner whatsoever out of any act or omission, interruption or cessation of services by the other Party under this Agreement. Each Party shall not be liable or responsible for any direct, indirect special or consequential damages sustained by the other Party to this Agreement, including, but not limited to, delay, or interruption of business activities that may result in any manner whatsoever from any act or omission, interruption, or cessation of services.
 
7. INDEMNIFICATION
Subject to the limitations and conditions of the Oregon Tort Claims Act, ORS 030.260 through 030.300, and Article XI, -Section 7 of the Oregon Constitution, each Party to this Agreement shall be solely responsible for its own actions and /or failure to act and shall indemnify and hold the other Party harmless from any liability, cost or damage arising therefrom. Provided, however, that neither Party shall be required to indemnify the others for any claim, loss or liability arising solely out of the wrongful act of the others officers, employees or agents. The provisions of this paragraph shall survive the expiration or sooner termination of this Agreement
 
8. TERM OF AGREEMENT
 
The term of this Agreement shall become effective upon the date with this Agreement is fully executed by all Parties and shall continue in full force until ______________ or until earlier terminated as provided herein. The Agreement may be amended in writing to extend the term for __ (_) additional ___ (_) year periods upon both parties when agreed to and signed by both parties. 
 
9. TERMINATION
    a. Mutual Consent. This Agreement may be terminated at any time by mutual consent of both Parties.
    b. Parties’ Convenience. This Agreement may be terminated at any time by either Party upon 90 days’ notice in writing and delivered by certified mail or in person.
    c. For Cause. Either Party may terminate or modify this Agreement, in whole or in part, effective upon delivery or written notice to the other Party, or at such later date as may be established by either Party, under any of the following conditions:
        1) If OWNER funding is insufficient to allow for the provision of services required.
        2) If federal, state or local laws or guidelines are modified, changed, or interpreted in such a way that the services are no longer allowable or appropriate or eligible for use of OWNER funds.
       3) If any license or certificate required by law or regulation to be held by either Party to provide the services required by this Agreement is for any reason denied, revoked, suspended, or not renewed.
   d. For Default or Breach. 
       1)   Either OWNER or OSU may terminate this Agreement in the event of a breach of the Agreement by the other. Prior to such termination the Party seeking termination shall give to the other Party written notice of the breach and intent to terminate. If the Party committing the breach has not entirely cured the breach within 30 days of the date of notice, or within such other period as the Party giving the notice may authorize or require, then the Agreement may be terminated at any time thereafter by a written notice of termination by the Party giving notice.
       2)   Waiver of any breach of any term or condition of this Agreement shall not be deemed a waiver of any prior of subsequent breach. No term shall be waived or deleted except in writing signed in advance by the Parties.
 
10. CONSTRUCTION, MODIFICATION OF THIS AGREEMENT
      a. This Agreement shall be construed and enforced in accordance with the laws of the State of Oregon.
      b. Subcontracts and Assignment; Successors in Interest: Parties shall not enter into any subcontracts for any of the work required by the Agreement, or assign or transfer any of its interest in this Agreement, without prior written consent of the other. The provisions of this Agreement shall be binding upon and shall inure to the benefit of the Parties hereto, and their respective successors and assigns, if any.
      c. No Third Party Beneficiaries: OWNER and OSU are the only Parties to this Agreement and are the only Parties involved entitled to enforce its terms. Nothing in this Agreement gives, is intended to give, or shall be construed to give or provide, any benefit or right, whether directly, indirectly or otherwise, to third persons unless such third persons are individually identified by name herein and expressly described as intended beneficiaries of the terms of this Agreement.
      d. OWNER has assigned ______________, OWNER’s ___________, as its Contract Manager. OSU has assigned __________, together with the Office of Business Services, as its Contract Manager. The governing bodies of OSU and OWNER may designate successor Contract Managers, at any time in each of their sole discretion. All notices required or convenient to be given under this Agreement shall be given, in writing, or by e-mail, by the Contract Manager, directed to the other Contract Manager at the addresses indicated, below:
 
For OSU
 
Department Contact                       with a copy to            Office of Business Services
________________                                                         644 SW 13th Street
________________                                                         Corvallis, Oregon 97333
 
 
For OWNER
 
_______________
_______________
_______________
 
 
THIS AGREEMENT CONTAINS THE ENTIRE AGREEMENT BETWEEN THE PARTIES HERETO AND SUPERSEDES ANY AND ALL PRIOR EXPRESS AND/OR IMPLIED STATEMENTS, NEGOTIATIONS AND/OR AGREEMENTS BETWEEN THE PARTIES, EITHER ORAL OR WRITTEN, AND MAY NOT BE AMENDED, CHANGED OR MODIFIED IN ANY WAY, EXCEPT BY WRITTEN AGREEMENT SIGNED BY ALL PARTIES HERETO.
 
IN WITNESS WHEREOF, the Parties hereby enter into this Agreement.
 
Each Party, by signature below of its authorized representative, hereby acknowledges that it has read this Agreement, understands it, and agrees to be bound by its terms and conditions. Each person signing this Agreement represents and warrants having authority to execute this Agreement.
 
 
 
____________________                                            THE STATE OF OREGON
____________________                                            ACTING BY AND THROUGH
____________________                                            THE STATE BOARD OF HIGHER
____________________                                            EDUCATION ON BEHALF OF
____________________                                            OREGON STATE UNIVERSITY AND ITS 
                                                                                  __________________________
 
 
_______________________                               _____________________________
By:                               date                              By: Tamara J. Bronson date
Its:                                                                    Its: Procurement & Contracts Supervisor
 
 
 
 

 


  *Can replace OWNER with the name of Agency and replace throughout the document.
  **This would need to be changed if it wasn’t an intergovernmental agreement.

 


Appendix C.1. Letter to Prospective Online Master Gardener Course StudentsThis letter is posted online, on the ECampus Online Master Gardener page. This page may be accessed at: (http://ecampus.oregonstate.edu/workforce/master-gardener-online/).

 
DATE
 
Greetings,
 
Thank you for your interest in OSU Extension’s Master Gardener™ volunteer program. Applications are now being accepted for the TERM offering of the Online Master Gardener course. If you are interested in participating in this course, as one part of the process required to become an OSU Extension Master Gardener volunteer, please complete and return an application. Your application will be routed to and reviewed by Master Gardener Program staff at the county Extension office where you will complete your volunteer service. This volunteer service is the second part of the process required to become an OSU Extension Master Gardener volunteer. After you complete your application, you may be contacted by the county Extension agent that manages the Master Gardener Program in your area. You will be notified by the Statewide Master Gardener Program office, as to whether or not you have been accepted into the TERM class of Online Master Gardener trainees, by DATE.
 
Acceptance into the online Master Gardener course, as Master Gardener trainee, is contingent upon a mutual agreement by you and your county Extension office. Knowing the volunteer opportunities and requirements of your local Master Gardener Program will help you to decide if you are able to fulfill the volunteer service that is required to become a certified OSU Extension Master Gardener volunteer. The volunteer service requirement, to be completed out of county Extension offices, varies from 30-70 hours and must be satisfied within one year of completing the online Master Gardener course. Volunteer activities within counties vary according to local needs, but may include: answering gardening questions during the gardening season (in the Extension office, at Farmers Markets, at Garden Fairs, or online), youth gardening instruction, demonstration and community garden projects, educational fairs, etc. For more information on the volunteer activities available to Master Gardeners in your area, you may want to contact your local Extension office.
 
If you decide that you are not able to fulfill the volunteer service requirement of the OSU Extension Master Gardener Program, you may want to consider enrolling in the online Master Gardener course to pursue a Certificate of Home Horticulture, rather than a Master Gardener badge. The cost of this training is $400 (compared to the $300 tuition charged to Master Gardener trainees). The Certificate of Home Horticulture does not entail a service requirement. Thus, those students pursuing a Certificate of Home Horticulture are not obligated to volunteer with the Master Gardener Program at any time.
 
The TERM online Master Gardener™ class will begin on DATE and will end on DATE. Classes will be delivered via the BlackBoard Portal System. Once you are accepted into the course, register and pay your tuition via ECampus, you will receive a login ID and password to access the online Master Gardener course. In this course, you will learn about plant types (e.g. woody, herbaceous), garden types (e.g. container, vegetable), and elements (pathogens, soils, insects, management decisions ) that influence the growth and vigor of plants in the home garden.
 
Classroom space is limited to 50 students, so early application is encouraged. If you have any questions, please feel free to contact me.
 
Sincerely,
Gail Langellotto
Statewide Coordinator – OSU Master Gardner Program
 

Appendix C.2. Application for Online Master Gardener CourseThis form is placed online, prior to registration.

 
MASTER GARDENER™ APPLICATION
OSU Extension Service-Online Master Gardener Course
 
Name (please type or print): _________________________________________________
 
Mailing Address: _________________________________________________________
 
City: _____________________________   Zip: _________   Phone: _______________
 
E-mail: ___________________________ Cell Phone: ___________________________
 
Select one option below.
 
______  I want to take the online Master Gardener course of instruction AND volunteer the number of hours required by my county Extension office, en route to becoming a certified OSU Extension Master Gardener. The cost of this option is $300, and includes access the online Master Gardener course and instruction
 
______  I want to take the Master Gardener course of instruction and NOT volunteer any time for a cost of $400. The fee covers access to the online Master Gardener course and instruction.
 
Please select the county Extension office that you would be working with to complete your volunteer service:
 
Please note: if your county is not listed, it is because they are not currently able to coordinate volunteer service projects for students completing the online Master Gardener course.
 
Please briefly answer the questions that follow.
 
How did you learn of the Master Gardener™ Program?
 
 
How many years of gardening experience do you have?
 
 
Please list any specialized garden-related training you have received.
 
 
What interests you and what do you expect to gain from the Master Gardener™ program?
 
 
Please list areas of specialization or hobbies (e.g. vegetables, greenhouses, roses, etc.)
In what ways could you best contribute to the Master Gardener™ program? For example: teaching, 4-H and youth projects, senior projects, horticultural demonstrations, web page construction and maintenance, etc.
 
Please list volunteer activities in which you have participated within the last five years.
 
 
Please list one personal reference, include address and phone number.
 
 
Please list general days and times that you know you will not be available for volunteer service (vacation, job, other regular commitments).
 
 
The following information is required on federal reports and affects funding. Ethnic data is required for institutional compliance with the Civil Rights Act of 1964. Please check the appropriate boxes.
ð       White, non-Hispanic
ð       Black or African American, non-Hispanic
ð       Hispanic
ð       Native American or Alaskan Native
ð       Asian or Pacific Islander
ð       More than one race
 
ð       Male
ð       Female
I certify that all the information given in this application is true, accurate and complete, to the best of my knowledge.
 
Date
 
Signature
 
Complete this application form and return it, by DATE, to: EMAIL
 
If you are accepted as a Master Gardener trainee for the winter 20XX offering of the online Master Gardener course, you will receive a letter of acceptance, with a password for registration, by December 15, 20XX. Please note: a letter of acceptance is required to enter the online course as a Master Gardener trainee (i.e. those pursuing a Master Gardener badge). However, you may register without a letter of acceptance if you are pursuing the Certificate of Home Horticulture ($400 registration fee and no volunteer service requirement).
 
Early application is encouraged for both the Master Gardener badge and the Certificate of Home Horticulture options, as space is limited.
 
Oregon State University Extension Service offers educational programs, activities, and materials?without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, national origin, age, marital status, disability, and disabled veteran or Vietnam-era veteran status?as required by Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, Title IX of theEducational Amendments of 1972, and Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973. Oregon State UniversityExtension Service is an Equal Opportunity Employer.
 

 
Online Master Gardener Basic Training Course
Syllabus – Winter 2009
 
Course Outline and Syllabus 
  
Course description: In this course, you will learn about the art and the science of caring for plants. Specifically, our focus will be on the prevention and diagnosis of plant problems, as well as a least toxic approach to tolerating and/or managing plant problems in the home horticultural landscape.
 
We examine plant types (e.g. woody, herbaceous), garden types (e.g. container, vegetable), and elements (pathogens, soils, insects, management decisions ) that influence the growth and vigor of plants in the home garden. 
 
This course is designed for anyone who is interested in learning more about the effective and sustainable management of their home horticultural landscape. A basic understanding of plants is helpful, but not required. 
 
On average, students should expect to spend 6 hours per week, viewing narrated lectures and completing readings, assignments and quizzes. Some modules, such as the sustainable landscaping and container gardening modules, are likely to require less time. Individuals without a background in science or horticulture may find that it will take more than 6 hours per week to complete some of the more technical modules, such as basic botany, soils and entomology.
 
The Master Gardener basic training course is hosted in OSU's Blackboard (Bb) Learning Portal System. To access Blackboard, please go to:
 
 
To login, you should use the username and password, which was provided to you by ECampus upon successful registration for this course.
  
Instructor: Gail Langellotto, Ph.D. (Entomology, 2002)
  
Office: 4131 Agriculture and Life Sciences Building, OSU, Corvallis, OR
  
Voice-mail or Phone:  (541) 737-5175 . 
  
 
Please note: the *best* way to contact your instructor is via the discussion board on the Blackboard course page.
 
Text: Sustainable Gardening: the Oregon-Washington Master Gardener Handbook.  OSU Extension Publication EM 8742.
 
Electronic versions of the assigned readings from the text will be posted on the Blackboard Course page. A hard copy of the entire Sustainable Gardening text may be purchased for $30.00 from OSU’s Extension Service Publication and Multimedia Catalog:
 
http://extension.oregonstate.edu/catalog/index.php
 
Simply use the search function to locate EM 8742.
  
Objectives: My goals in teaching this course include introducing students to the basic terms, concepts and practices associated with installing and maintaining a home garden in a manner that is both successful and sustainable. Here, a ‘successful garden’ is defined a garden that meets the needs and expectations of the gardener. Similarly, a ‘sustainable garden’ is defined as one where the gardener is able to meet these needs and expectations, without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs (modified from the definition of sustainable development, in: United Nations. 1987. "Report of the World Commission on Environment and Development." General Assembly Resolution 42/187, 11 December 1987. Retrieved: 2008-08-30). Ultimately, I hope to equip students with information and ways of thinking that will enable them to make informed decisions about their choice of plant materials and management approach in the garden. 
 
Method of Instruction: Narrated Power Point Lectures, Readings, Assignments, Quizzes, Supporting Web Materials, Internet Threaded Discussions, Online Chats, Final Exam.
  
Policy on Class Participation: It is up to the student whether s/he chooses to actively participate in class via the completion of readings, assignments, quizzes and discussion. All of these are optional, and students will not be graded on their performance of these tasks. However, you are likely to acquire and retain more knowledge, and to enjoy your online learning experience more, if you are actively engaged in the course. Thus, students are STRONGLY encouraged to complete all readings and assignments, to challenge themselves with the quiz, and to post or respond to posts on the discussion board on a weekly basis.
 
Final Exam: There will be a single, open book and open note final exam for this course. In order to earn your Certificate of Home Horticulture, you must earn a 70% or above on this exam. 
 
The final exam will be available to students, beginning at noon on April 6, 2009. Access to the final exam will end at 11:59 pm, Pacific Standard Time on April 12, 2009. During this time, all course modules will be open and available for student use.
 
Like the quizzes associated with each module, the final exam format is multiple choice, true/false, matching and short answer. However, where the quizzes are between 10 and 20 questions in length, the final exam is between 80-100 questions in length.
 
The goal of the final exam is not to test how well you can remember items presented during the course, but to instead test how well you can carefully consider a question and utilize proper resource materials to formulate an answer.
 
Thus, you are allowed and encouraged to use all course materials, including lectures, readings, previous assignments and previous quizzes to help you complete the final exam. You may also use the PNW Handbooks and other OSU Extension materials to complete the final exam. 
 
·        PNW Plant Disease URL: http://plant-disease.ippc.orst.edu/
·        PNW Weeds URL: http://weeds.ippc.orst.edu/pnw/weeds
·        PNW Insects URL: http://insects.ippc.orst.edu/pnw/insects
·        OSU Extension Publications: http://extension.oregonstate.edu/catalog/
 
If you earn less than 70% on your first attempt at the Final Exam, you must make an appointment to discuss your results with the instructor. You will then be given one chance to retake the exam. If you score less than 70% on this second attempt, you will not earn your Certificate of Home Horticulture, as you will not have successfully completed the requirements for this course.
 
Online Social Networking: Students come to the online Master Gardener course from a range of professional backgrounds and with a variety of knowledge that can enhance the learning experience of their class. Students with questions are thus encouraged to share these questions with the entire class, via the Blackboard Discussion Forum. Likewise, students are encouraged to regularly check the Discussion Forum, and to read and respond to their classmates’ postings.
 
FacebookTM is a social utility that allows users to connect with friends and family across the globe. I regularly use Facebook to keep in touch with my overseas friends, and with my family on the east coast of the United States. 
 
You may find it enjoyable to get to know your classmates outside of the Blackboard Learning Portal System. A Facebook group has been set up for the Oregon Master Gardener Program:
 
 
You will need a Facebook account to access this group, as well as the other features of Facebook. These features include: photo sharing, video sharing, virtual bookshelf and a variety of games that you can play, online, with friends and family.
   
ADA Students: Students who qualify for assistance under the ADA should notify the instructor the first week of class if they require assistance in the course. It is the student's responsibility to inform the instructor of his/her needs. 
  
Module Availability: Course modules will be made available to students by noon of the day on which a specific module begins. Once modules are made available to students, the modules and their associated content will remain open and available for the duration of the course. Thus, the Basic Botany module will be available, beginning at noon on January 12th and continuing through the close of this course, at 11:59pm Pacific Standard Time (PST) on April 12th. The Plant Pathology module will be available, beginning at noon on February 9, and continuing through the close of the course at 11:59pm (PST) on April 12th.
 
Missed Classes: Because course modules will remain open during and after the week for which they are scheduled (through 11:59pm PST on April 12, 2009) you will be able to make up any coursework that you might have missed. Simply work through the missed module at your own pace. Remember, your completion of quizzes, readings and assignments is optional, but is strongly encouraged, so that you can better learn and integrate the content of this course.
 
Notice: The contents of this syllabus are subject to change in the event of extenuating circumstances, or if the instructor deems it necessary. 

 


Appendix D.1. Volunteer Log Sheet for VRS

 


Appendix E.1.  OSU Master Gardener™  and OSU Extension Logos.The following representations of the program logo are trademarked. The daisy logo is an Oregon State University logo that is trademarked. The color is not specified; however the use of orange and black is encouraged.

 
An example of how chapters may use ‘OSU Master Gardener™’ includes:
 
·        XXXXXXX Chapter of the Oregon Master Gardener™ Association
 

Appendix E.2. OSU Extension logoThe OSU Extension logo must be used on all goods, wall hangings, banners, posters, paper, clothing, advertising and educational materials used in conjunction with the Master Gardener Program.

 


 

To report your hours online, go to the following address:
http://extension.oregonstate.edu/mg/vrs/enrollment/index.php

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

AttachmentSize
AppendixA2Contract_and_Reimbursement_Agreement.docx72.03 KB
Master Gardener Agreement Template - Garden Project-Demo Garden.docx21.36 KB
Sample_Acceptance_Letter.docx65.23 KB
Sample_Interview_Questions.docx22.39 KB
Sample_Master_Gardener_Volunteer_Application.docx66.63 KB
Sample_News_Release_about_OSU_MGProgram.docx65.72 KB
Sample_Rejection_Letter.docx65.57 KB
OSU_Master_Gardener_and_OSU_Extension_Logos.docx308.71 KB
OSU Extension Logo.docx81.88 KB
Re-Application_Transfer_Form.docx66.77 KB
Sample_Syllabus_for_Online_Master_Gardener_Course_Students.docx28.16 KB
Application_for_Online_Master_Gardener_Course.docx25.59 KB
Letter_to_Prospective_Online_Master_Gardener_Course_Students.docx24.52 KB
List_of_Extension_faculty_and_others_who_teach_Master_Gardener_training_classes.docx28.42 KB
Copy_of_the_OSU_Master_Gardener_Certificate_of_Completion.docx219.51 KB
Copy_of_Recertification_Exam.docx25.17 KB
Copy_of_Extension_Educator_Peer_Evaluation.docx27.69 KB
Certificates_of_Recertification_for_Veteran_Master_Gardeners.docx170.17 KB
Copy_of_ OSU_Master_Gardener_Certificate_of_Appreciation.docx23.18 KB
Master_Gardener_Volunteer_Hours_Log_Sheet_for_VRS.docx75.48 KB
Master_Gardener_Training_Fees_2010-2009.xlsx13.7 KB
Use of the Term MG 11_11_2009.docx73.63 KB
Master_Gardener_Position_Description_2011.docx79.34 KB
Code_of_Conduct_for_Master_Gardener_Volunteers.docx79.18 KB
Orientation Letter for Lettuce Grow Students.doc41.5 KB