News for the Horticulture Department

Purple TomatoesThe Purple Tomato FAQ

Learn more about this promising release from Oregon State University Department of Horticulture Plant Breeder Jim Myers.

GMO crops differ from traditional breeding techniques (Statesman Journal)

GMO crops differ from traditional breeding techniques (Statesman Journal)
“Depending on the species, natural cross-breeding is easy. For some plants, you have to physically make the cross,” said Jim Myers, professor of vegetable breeding and genetics in the department of horticulture at Oregon State University.

PNW 667, Cherry Training Systems

PNW 667, Cherry Training Systems
Lynn E. Long, Gregory Lang, Stefano Musacchi, Matthew Whiting
New. This publication describes the seven major pruning systems used in commercial cherry tree orchards in Oregon, Idaho, Washington, and Michigan.
This publication replaces PNW 543.

EM 9113, Noncrop Host Plants of Spotted Wing Drosophila in North America

EM 9113, Noncrop Host Plants of Spotted Wing Drosophila in North America
Amy J. Dreves, Jana Lee, Linda J. Brewer, Rufus Isaacs, Greg Loeb, Howard Thistlewood
New. Landscapes surrounding fruit production fields often include hedgerows, adjacent field margins, and woody or riparian areas with ornamentals, unmanaged shrubs, vines, or other plants that also produce fruits. Noncrop habitats can meet the requirements that favor Spotted Wing Drosophila (SWD) adults and their natural enemies: food, shelter, shade, and humidity. In addition, many noncrop fruits can support developing larvae of SWD. As populations of SWD build in noncrop hosts, these areas can become “hot spots” from which SWD can move into fields as commercial fruits begin to ripen. In some regions, these plants may be more important in post-crop dynamics by providing opportunities for late season population buildup.

Secret to growing highbush blueberries (Oregonian)

Secret to growing highbush blueberries (Oregonian)
Highbush blueberries, the most common in Oregon, are perennial, long-living deciduous shrubs with a mature height of 5-7 feet, according to Bernadine Strik, a berry specialist for Oregon State University’s Extension Service. Attractive as ornamentals, they produce a profusion of white or pink blossoms in spring and colorful foliage in fall.

Earliest blooms in decades (Hood River News)

Earliest blooms in decades (Hood River News)
“Here at the Experiment Station, the trees blossomed 20 days earlier than average, and that’s considerable,” said Oregon State University horticulturist Steve Castagnoli. He said that according to OSU records dating to 1944, this is the earliest bloom for Anjous and Bartletts, the two mainstay pear varieties in Hood River County, the nation’s premier pear-growing region.