News for the Horticulture Department

Purple TomatoesThe Purple Tomato FAQ

Learn more about this promising release from Oregon State University Department of Horticulture Plant Breeder Jim Myers.

Gorge’s wine success rooted in Wright’s old vine legacy (Capital Press)

Gorge’s wine success rooted in Wright’s old vine legacy (Capital Press)
For winemakers, the Gorge represents the “blessing and challenge” of a diverse American Viticultural Area, said Mark Chien, program coordinator of the Oregon Wine Research Institute at Oregon State University. “They are well on their way to making great wine,” Chien said. “It’s sort of like where the Willamette Valley was 25 years ago: You figure out what the heck you’ve got and what to do about it.”

SWD – How to stop a proliferate press (Good Fruit Growers)

SWD – How to stop a proliferate press (Good Fruit Growers)
Since 2008, USDA has funded $47.7 million in competitive research grants and Extension programming to combat spotted wing drosophila, many through the Specialty Crop Research Initiative (SCRI), under USDA’s National Institute of Food and Agriculture (NIFA). That effort includes a five-year, $5.4 million project at Oregon State University headed by Dr. Vaughn Walton, which kick-started the efforts in 2010.

Battle bugs with low risk to us, animals, land (Oregonian)

Battle bugs with low risk to us, animals, land (Oregonian)
Blood thirsty as that may sound, most gardeners don’t appreciate planting a garden only to have it turn into a mottled, notched or spotted mess. Sure, a certain amount of nibbling is to be expected and tolerated by gardeners who use integrated pest management, said Heather Stoven, a horticulturist with Oregon State University Extension Service. But dead plants are not.

Oregon State University offers lazy person’s lawn (Register-Guard)

Oregon State University offers lazy person’s lawn (Register-Guard)
If you’re weary of lawn mowing chores already this year, Oregon State University has a potential solution for you: the ecolawn. The ecolawn — including varieties developed by OSU horticulturalists — requires mowing about once every three weeks and watering, maybe, twice in the summer, according to OSU.

Pollinator gardens: Planting with a purpose (Corvallis Advocate)

Pollinator gardens: Planting with a purpose (Corvallis Advocate)
“Most people focus only on pollinator plants. These flowering plants offer nectar and pollen that can attract pollinating insects. But, also important are practices that allow pollinators to nest and persist in your garden,” said Gail Langellotto, the statewide coordinator for the Oregon State University Extension Service’s Master Gardener program.