News for the Horticulture Department

Purple TomatoesThe Purple Tomato FAQ

Learn more about this promising release from Oregon State University Department of Horticulture Plant Breeder Jim Myers.

Gardeners dig program (The Dalles Chronicle)

Gardeners dig program (The Dalles Chronicle)
Spring is just around the corner and the Oregon State University Extension Service in Wasco County has lined up a variety of classes to help gardeners beautify their yards and grow healthy vegetables.

PNW cherry growers expect smaller crop (Capital Press)

PNW cherry growers expect smaller crop (Capital Press)
Temperatures crashed as much as 60 degrees in just a couple of days in mid-November killing flower buds, spurs and even 1-, 2- and 3-year-old wood in cherry trees in The Dalles, Hood River and Milton-Freewater, said a panel of speakers led by Lynn Long, Oregon State University Extension tree fruit specialist at The Dalles.

Researcher-farmer named Nut Grower of the Year (Capital Press)

Researcher-farmer named Nut Grower of the Year (Capital Press)
Harry Lagerstedt, who worked for the agency’s Agricultural Research Service, is known for his popularization the Ennis hazelnut variety. The cultivar produces high yields of large nuts and continues to receive a premium price from buyers due to its size, said Dave Smith, an Oregon State University researcher.

Flowers of winter make a heady statement in garden (Statesman Journal)

Flowers of winter make a heady statement in garden (Statesman Journal)
“One of the coolest things about gardening in the Pacific Northwest is winter gardens,” said Neil Bell, a horticulturist with Oregon State University’s Extension Service. “We have the opportunity to plant things that people who are not aware of or even interested in gardening will look at it and be amazed. The way to do that is with flowers and scents.”

Hazelnut farmers squeeze profits from sickly orchards (Capital Press)

Hazelnut farmers squeeze profits from sickly orchards (Capital Press)
Eastern filbert blight can be slowed by cutting away “cankers” that allow the fungus to release spores and infect new trees, said Jay Pscheidt, plant pathology professor at Oregon State University.