2009 WSU and OSU Turfgrass Field Day

Reports from the 2009 WSU and OSU Turfgrass Field Day.

*The following is a slideshare presentation.  Click the left or right arrows to navigate through the presentation, or click "full" to view the presentation in full-screen.

BeaverTurf Community Site

Along with the BeaverTurf.com website, we are also launching a BeaverTurf Community site.  An online community for Turf Professionals, the site is intended to:

  • Connect turf professionals in order to build relationships and increase networking
  • Provide a forum for collaboration, discussion, and knowledge sharing
  • Keep turf professionals up to date with the latest and greatest news, research, and resources

Check it out and sign up herehttp://beaverturf.ning.com

New Turf Website

BeaverTurf.com - the new turfgrass website from Oregon State University - is nearing completion.  We hope you like the new site and the information and resources that it provides. 

Please let us know about any bugs, errors, or other problems that you might encounter, as well as any other feedback you may have.  Thanks and happy surfing!

Putting green Anthracnose trials: 2007

Putting green Anthracnose trials: 2007

Evaluation of different products in the management of Anthracnose.  The trial site was the Emerald Valley Golf Club, Cresswell, OR.  The site has a history of severe Anthracnose.  Many thanks to Scott Larsen for letting us use his practice green.

Necrotic Ring Spot on Turf in Oregon

Necrotic Ring Spot on Turf in Oregon

Describes necrotic ring spot disease and methods of prevention and control.

Annual Bluegrass , Poa annua L.

Annual Bluegrass , Poa annua L.

Revised Feb. 2008

In nature, annual bluegrass, Poa annua L. behaves as a true annual. It germinates in fall or spring when moisture is adequate and develops quickly, often flowering six to eight weeks after germination. In the Pacific Northwest we see it most commonly as a winter annual (Fig 1). After flowering and setting seed these annual types die typically from drought and leave dormant viable seed behind to germinate when moisture again becomes available. This efficiency in seed production makes annual bluegrass a major component of the seed bank of cultivated soils.

Creeping Bentgrass

Creeping Bentgrass

Introduction:

For as long as golf has been played in the Pacific Northwest creeping bentgrass has been planted on putting greens, first as a component of South German mixed bentgrass, and later as seeded or stolonized varieties. In recent years, intense breeding and selection work has resulted in a flood of new cultivars with widely varying characteristics and generally much improved surface quality. While early creeping bentgrasses quickly gave way to annual bluegrass, newer cultivars are much more competitive and may prove to be much more persistent.

2007 Evaluation of timing and number of fungicide applications for control of Anthracnose on annual bluegrass putting turf

2007 Evaluation of timing and number of fungicide applications for  control of A

Introduction

The first goal of this trial was to evaluate the effects of timing and number of applications on control of anthracnose (Colletotrichum cereale) on an annual bluegrass putting green.

A second goal of this trial was to determine the minimum number of applications necessary to produce acceptable turf quality.

Materials and Methods

2007 Evaluation of Fungicides and Fungicide Programs for the Control of Anthracnose on Annual Bluegrass Putting Greens

2007 Evaluation of Fungicides and Fungicide Programs for the  Control of Anthrac

Introduction

The purpose of this trial was to evaluate the effectiveness of various fungicides and fungicide programs in controlling anthracnose (Colletotrichum cereale) on annual bluegrass putting greens.

Materials and Methods

The trial was initiated on June 26th on an annual bluegrass putting green located at Emerald Valley Golf Club in Cresswell, Oregon. Subsequent fungicide applications were applied every 3 weeks on July 18th, August 8th, August 29th, and September 19th.

2007 Evaluation of 3 and 4 Week Timing Intervals of Fungicide Applications for the Control of Anthracnose on Annual Bluegrass Fairways

2007 Evaluation of 3 and 4 Week Timing Intervals of Fungicide Applications for t

Final Report - February 7, 2008

Introduction

The purpose of this trial was to evaluate different timing intervals of fungicide applications necessary to control anthracnose (Colletotrichum cereale) on annual bluegrass fairways. Three products were evaluated combined with and without Daconil Ultrex: Cleary’s 3336, Cleary’s 3336 Plus, and Banner Maxx.

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