Filled-furrow Squash Cultivator: Weed 'Em and Reap Part 1

Source:

Weed 'Em and Reap Part 1: Tools for Non-Chemical Weed Management in Vegetable Cropping Systems [DVD]. A. Stone. 2006. Oregon State University Dept. of Horticulture. Corvallis, Oregon. Available at: http://www.weedemandreap.org (verified 17 Dec 2008).

Featuring

Jeff Falen, Persephone Farm. Lebanon, OR.

Audio Text

Filled-Furrow Squash Cultivator: Weed Em and Reap

Lely Tine Weeder: Weed 'Em and Reap Part 1

Source

Weed 'Em and Reap Part 1: Tools for Non-Chemical Weed Management in Vegetable Cropping Systems [DVD]. A. Stone. 2006. Oregon State University Dept. of Horticulture. Corvallis, Oregon. Available at: http://www.weedemandreap.org (verified July 2010).

Featuring

Mark Wheeler, Pacific Botanicals. Grants Pass, OR.

Audio Text

Organic Weed Management Lely Tine Weeder: Weed Em and Reap

Weed Em and Reap Part 1. Retractable Blade Cultivator

This is a Weed 'Em and Reap Part 1 video clip. Featuring Rob Heater, Stahlbush Island Farms. Corvallis, OR. Audio Text This is what we call an in-row cultivator. It’s built on to a Buffalo cultivator, which is made in the Midwest, I think back in Nebraska. It’s a high-residue, no-till cultivator. We happen to have had a bunch of these that we were using in our crops anyway and decided to make an attachment in here for killing weeds in widely spaced crops, like winter squash and different pumpkins.

Retractable Blade Cultivator: Weed Em and Reap

Video Clip: Weed Em and Reap Part 1. Filled-Furrow Squash Cultivator

This is a Weed 'Em and Reap Part 1 video clip. Featuring Jeff Falen, Persephone Farm. Lebanon, OR. Audio Text

Filled-Furrow Squash Cultivator: Weed Em and Reap

OSU Clubroot Resistant Brassica Variety Trials (2015-16)

This handout summarizes the results from clubroot resistant brassica (cabbage, broccoli, cauliflower, Napa cabbage, etc) variety trials conducted in 2015-16 on farms in the Willamette Valley of Oregon as well as in greenhouse screening trials.

Winter Squash Production Resources

It is difficult to find information on winter squash production and storage. This page aggregates resources relevant to Oregon winter squash growers.

 

Alex Stone is fixing broken links and adding new content in January 2021 - come back soon!

Winter Squash Storage Rots and Their Management

Farmers in western Oregon can lose a significant portion of their winter squash in storage to storage rots. In winters 2012-2015 we collected samples of stored squash with rot symptoms from farmers in western Oregon and the OSU Plant Clinic identified the pathogens causing those rots. This article includes photos of the rot symptoms, descriptions of the diseases, and information on how to control storage rots.

Cabbage Maggot

Adult cabbage maggot
Juvenile cabbage maggot

Cabbage maggot is a root-boring pest affecting brassica crops. It can cause wilting and increased risk for plant pathogens.

White Mold of Snap Bean and Other Vegetable Crops

White mold is a serious foliar and pod disease of snap beans grown for processing in western Oregon as well as in all major snap bean production regions in the US. White mold has a wide host range as it is a pathogen on more than 400 plant species.

Liming and clubroot control in brassicas- handout for 2013 Veg Field Day

Clubroot is becoming an increasing problem on Willamette Valley vegetable farms. Most cultivated brassica crops (broccoli, cauliflower, cabbage, etc.) are highly susceptible to the disease, which is caused by the soilborne fungus Plasmodiophora brassicae. In severe cases it can cause significant crop losses, and heavily infested fields may be taken out of production. Once a field is infected, eliminating the pathogen is difficult if not impossible because its thick walled resting spores have been shown to remain viable in soil for up to 18 years. As a result, once pathogen populations have developed to economically damaging levels, the goal of the farmer is to manage rather than eradicate the disease. One effective control strategy is to raise the soil pH to ≥7.2 through liming.

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