Sweet corn diseases and their management in the PNW: seed treatment evaluations and development of Fusarium-free seed (2013)

Research report to the Oregon Processed Vegetable Commission

Cindy Ocamb  
OSU Dept. of Botany and Plant Pathology

Mold Management in Snap Bean (2013)

Research report to the Oregon Processed Vegetable Commission

Cindy Ocamb  
OSU Dept. of Botany and Plant Pathology

Detection of Plasmodiophora brassicae (causal agent of Clubroot) in vegetable production fields of the Pacific Northwest (2013)

Research report to the Oregon Processed Vegetable Commission

Cindy Ocamb
OSU Dept. of Botany and Plant Pathology

Wildlife and fish use of seasonal watercourses and wetlands in vegetable producing farms of the Willamette Valley (2013)

Research report to the Oregon Processed Vegetable Commission

Guillermo Giannico and Dana Sanchez
OSU Dept. of Fisheries and Wildlife   

Integrated strategies to improve weed control in beet crop rotations in the Willamette Valley (2013)

Research report to the Oregon Processed Vegetable Commission

Ed Peachey
OSU Dept. of Horticulture
 

Weed Control in Snap Beans and Edamame with Fomesafen (Reflex) Herbicide (2013)

Research report to the Oregon Processed Vegetable Commission

Ed Peachey
OSU Department of Horticulture

Weed Control in Sweet Corn and Row Crop Rotations (2013)

Research report to the Oregon Processed Vegetable Commission

Ed Peachey
OSU Department of Horticulture

Liming and clubroot control in brassicas- handout for 2013 Veg Field Day

Clubroot is becoming an increasing problem on Willamette Valley vegetable farms. Most cultivated brassica crops (broccoli, cauliflower, cabbage, etc.) are highly susceptible to the disease, which is caused by the soilborne fungus Plasmodiophora brassicae. In severe cases it can cause significant crop losses, and heavily infested fields may be taken out of production. Once a field is infected, eliminating the pathogen is difficult if not impossible because its thick walled resting spores have been shown to remain viable in soil for up to 18 years. As a result, once pathogen populations have developed to economically damaging levels, the goal of the farmer is to manage rather than eradicate the disease. One effective control strategy is to raise the soil pH to ≥7.2 through liming.

Nitrogen utilization by green beans (2001)

This article looks at nitrogen utilization by snap beans grown in the Willamette Valley of Oregon and provides information necessary to make N fertilizer timing and rate decisions to maximize N uptake while minimizing environmental losses.

Weed management alternatives in sweet corn

Ed Peachey (OSU Dept. of Horticulture)

Objectives: Continue evaluating sweet corn tolerance to POST applied HPPD herbicides.

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