Efficacy and Crop Safety of Herbicides on Garden Beet, Spinach and Chard

Ed Peachey (OSU Dept. of Horticulture)

Objective:
Determine the efficacy and crop safety of herbicides on garden beet, spinach, and chard for the control of weeds.

Regional Pest Monitoring Program

Principle investigator: Jessica Green (OSU Horticulture)

VegNet is a regional pest monitoring and reporting network serving the Oregon processed vegetable industry, managed by the OSU Extension Service, and funded by the Oregon Processed Vegetable Commission. In the early spring of 2012, thirty six insect monitoring stations were established on cooperating farms located strategically throughout the Willamette Basin and maintained during the growing season.

The goals of the VegNet Regional Pest Monitoring and Reporting System are:

Predicting Phosphorus and Nitrogen Needs in Sweet Corn (2012)

Dan M. Sullivan, Aaron Heinrich, and Ed Peachey
Horticulture and Crop & Soil Science, OSU

Research Objectives

Sweet corn diseases and their management in the PNW: Seed treatments and development of Fusarium-free seed

Principal Investigator: Cynthia M. Ocamb, Ext. Specialist & Associate Professor
Botany and Plant Pathology, OSU – Corvallis
e-mail: ocambc@science.oregonstate.edu

Collaborator: James R. Myers, Horticulture, OSU – Corvallis

Objectives:

1. Conduct an evaluation of materials currently registered on sweet corn for control of seed rot and seedling blight.

Detection of Plasmodiophora brassicae (causal agent of Clubroot) in vegetable production fields of the Pacific Northwest

Principal Investigator: Cynthia M. Ocamb, Ext. Specialist & Associate Professor
Botany and Plant Pathology, OSU – Corvallis
e-mail: ocambc@science.oregonstate.edu

Collaborator: William Thomas, Post-doctoral research associate, BPP, OSU – Corvallis

Objectives:
1) Evaluate PCR protocol for P. brassicae testing of Willamette Valley field soils.

2) Conduct an evaluation of sampling protocols for PCR detection thresholds

 

Mold Management and Sclerotinia Ascospore Trapping in Snap Bean

Principal Investigator: Cynthia M. Ocamb, Ext. Specialist & Associate Professor
Botany and Plant Pathology, OSU - Corvallis
Telephone: (541) 737-4020
ocambc@science.oregonstate.edu

Cooperators: David H. Gent, USDA-ARS, Corvallis
Robert B. McReynolds, North Willamette Research & Ext. Center, OSU
Jim Myers, Dept. of Horticulture, OSU

Broccoli Breeding, Evaluation and Seed Production (2012)

Report to the Oregon Processed Vegetable Commission

Jim Meyers
OSU Dept of Horticulture

Brian Yorgey
OSU Dept of Food Science and Technology

Objectives:

Green Bean Breeding and Evaluation (2012)

Report to the Oregon Processed Vegetable Commission

Authors: Jim Myers and Brian Yorgey

Objective: Breed improved Bush Blue Lake green bean varieties with:

Gray and White Mold in Snap Beans

A number of growers and agricultural professionals have asked me whether we are seeing resistance to mold in snap beans to our currently registered fungicides. The short answer is, not to my knowledge. In a normal year, the primarily threat to snap beans is white mold (Sclerotinia sclerotiorum). When we have a cool, wet spring, we see both white mold and gray mold (Botrytis cinerea). Gray mold is a game changer. Gray mold control requires a tank mix, early timing, and a two spray program.

Weed and Sweet Corn Response to Option, Accent, and Callisto Herbicides (2004)

corn

Report to the Oregon Processed Vegetable Commission

Ed Peachey
OSU Dept. of Horticulture

Objective:

  1. Compare tolerance of sweet corn to Option (formasulfuron) herbicide.

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