Kohlrabi

Liming and clubroot control in brassicas- handout for 2013 Veg Field Day

Clubroot is becoming an increasing problem on Willamette Valley vegetable farms. Most cultivated brassica crops (broccoli, cauliflower, cabbage, etc.) are highly susceptible to the disease, which is caused by the soilborne fungus Plasmodiophora brassicae. In severe cases it can cause significant crop losses, and heavily infested fields may be taken out of production. Once a field is infected, eliminating the pathogen is difficult if not impossible because its thick walled resting spores have been shown to remain viable in soil for up to 18 years. As a result, once pathogen populations have developed to economically damaging levels, the goal of the farmer is to manage rather than eradicate the disease. One effective control strategy is to raise the soil pH to ≥7.2 through liming.

Outcrossing Potential for Brassica Species and Implications for Vegetable Crucifer Seed Crops of Growing Oilseed Brassicas in the Willamette Valley

Myers, J.R. 2006.  Outcrossing Potential for Brassica Species, and Implications for Vegetable Crucifer Seed Crops of Growing Oilseed Brassicas in the Willamette Valley.  OSUES SR 1064.

Kohlrabi

Brassica oleracea (Gongylodes Group)

Last revised February 11, 2010

VARIETIES (approximately 55-65 days).

Grand Duke, Kolibri F1 (purple), White Vienna. For trial: Gigante, Granlibakken, Purple Danube, Purple Vienna, Rapidstar, White Danube.

Kohlrabi. Photo credit: Bill Mansour, Oregon State University

Vegetable Variety Trials 2008. OSU Extension Series # EM 8777-08-E

OSU Vegetable Variety Trials 2008

Vegetables: beets, broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, corn, cucumbers, greens, kohlrabi, lettuce, melons, onions and shallots, potatoes, pumpkins and gourds, radishes, spinach, squash, swiss chard, tomatoes, turnips, watermelons
Authors:  Peter Boches, Miles Barrett, Shawna Zimmerman, Deborah Kean, and Jim Myers, Oregon State University