Oregon is home to many fresh market vegetable farmers growing a wide range of vegetable crops for wholesale and retail markets. This site aggregates information relevant to this grower group. Search below by topic and crop for research reports, extension bulletins, vegetable production guides, videos and webinars.

Features

Winter Squash Production and Storage Resources

Oregon Commercial Vegetable Production Guides

OSU Extension Small Farms Program

OSU Fertilizer and Cover Crop Calculator

Vegetable Variety Selection Resources

 

Videos

Publications

Lycopersicon esculentum

Last revised February 15, 2010

Last revised February 15, 2010

Lycopersicon esculentum

 Cichorium intybus L. var. folosum

 Last revised February 10, 2010

(See also file on Radicchio)

The terms "chicory" and "endive" are frequently interchanged because the "forced" product of Witloof chicory has been erroneously named French or Belgian endive. This information deals with the production of the forced Witloof chicory for chicons (4-6 inch, spindle-shaped heads or buds). Other synonyms are White Endive and Dutch chicory.

Citrullus lanatus

Last revised February 11, 2010

Many new varieties of watermelons have been developed in recent years. Yellow and seedless types are finding an increasing share of the specialty watermelon market. It is estimated that seedless red and yellow varieties that were virtually unknown ten years ago, and represent about 5% of the market today will increase their market share substantially in the near future. Small excellent quality "icebox" melons are also becoming increasingly popular.

Brassica rapa (Rapifera Group)

Last revised February 10, 2010

VARIETIES(approximately 30 days for greens).

Shogoin (roots edible), Seven Top (root inedible); For trial: Topper, All Top.

Other greens:

Mustard: Florida Broadleaf (most popular), Southern Giant Curled. For trial: Tendergreen II (a hybrid), Tendergreen, Southern Giant Curled.

Collards: Blue Max, Georgia Southern, Heavi-Crop, Top Bunch, Vates. For trial: Morris Heading, Champion, Carolina, and hybrid: Hi Crop.

 Brassica napus (Napobrassica group) and Brassica rapa (Rapifera Group)

 Last revised February 15, 2010

VARIETIES (approximately 60-80 days).

Rutabaga

Rheum rhabarbarum

 Last revised February 15, 2010

Ipomoea batatas

 Last revised February 15, 2010

Sweetpotato is one word because the crop is distinctly different from potato (Solanum tuberosum) and yam (Dioscorea sp.), which are also grown and marketed in the U.S.A. Production of true yams (sweetpotato is also marketed as yam), however, is negligible. Almost all aspects of sweetpotato production, harvest, handling and storage, are different from potato, so these crops must not be confused nor treated similarly.

Raphanus sativus

Last revised February 15, 2010

Cucurbita pepo

Last revised February 12, 2010

 Cichorium intybus

 Last revised February 10, 2010

(See also file on Witloof chicory)

VARIETIES (approximately 80 days).

This group of leafy vegetables falls under the general name of chicory. Heading and non-heading types exist. The heading types may be green-leaf or red. Some red types turn red only with the onset of cool weather.

Radicchio (Italian Chicory)

Last revised February 15, 2010

Cucurbita, several species, and ornamental, wax, sponge gourd, etc.

Last revised February 12, 2010

Spinacia oleracea

Last revised February 15, 2010

Capsicum annuum and C. frutescens

Last revised February 12, 2010

Allium cepa (Aggregatum Group)

 Last revised February 15, 2010

VARIETIES AND PLANTING STOCK

Shallots are normally propagated from bulb divisions. In addition, true seed of shallots is now available in both red and yellow types.

Shallots propagated from bulb divisions:

French Red Shallot - red type is the most common dry shallot grown. Other yellow or white varieties include Griselle, Chicken Leg Shallot, and Dutch Yellow, but only the red shallot is important in the market.

Tragopogon porrifolius and Scorzonera hispanica

Last revised February 15, 2010

 Abelmoschus esculentus

 Last revised February 12, 2010

Pisum sativum

 Last revised February 12, 2010

Peas in eastern Oregon are grown in the Blue Mountain area east of Pendleton to Milton-Freewater, mostly as dry-land production in rotation with wheat. More recently production has also been in the Hermiston area where soils may be more sandy and subject to wind erosion. Hermiston area production may be irrigated or non-irrigated.

Armoracia rusticana

Last revised February 11, 2010

 Allium cepa

 Last revised February 12, 2010

Last revised February 11, 2010

Herb production may be for culinary purposes (food flavoring), for scents and fragrances (potpourris), for medicinal uses or others (dyes, dried floral arrangements etc). Herb producers often grow for all these markets, and some herbs may be used for all these purposes.
Some of the most popular culinary herbs grown commercially and by home gardeners and hobbyists are: basil, cilantro (coriander), chervil, dill, oregano, mint, parsley, rosemary, sage, tarragon and thyme.

Brassica oleracea (Gongylodes Group)

Last revised February 11, 2010

VARIETIES (approximately 55-65 days).

Grand Duke, Kolibri F1 (purple), White Vienna. For trial: Gigante, Granlibakken, Purple Danube, Purple Vienna, Rapidstar, White Danube.

Kohlrabi. Photo credit: Bill Mansour, Oregon State University

Allium cepa

Last revised December 12, 2012

Allium cepa

Last revised February 12, 2010

Note: This file contains only information specific to production of pearl, set, and boiler onions. For more information on onion culture, refer to the files Dry Bulb Onions -- Eastern Oregon and Dry Bulb Onions -- Western Oregon.
Onion bulb size is influenced by a number of factors. Variety, plant density, photoperiod, and temperature are several important ones.

Onions for Dehydration

Allium cepa

Last revised February 12, 2010

 Allium fistulosum and Allium cepa

 Last revised February 12, 2010

Note: This file contains only information specific to the production of green bunching onions. For more information on onion culture, see the file Dry Bulb Onions -- Western Oregon.

Allium ampeloprasum (Porrum group)

Last revised February 11, 2010

Petroselinum hortense

 Last revised February 11, 2010

 VARIETIES (approximately 70-80 days)

Curly leaf: Deep Green, Forest Green, Moss Curled. For trial: Banquet, Emerald, Perfection.
Flat leaf (stronger flavored): Plain, Plain Italian Dark Green, Deep Green Italian. For trial: Giant Italian.
Hamburg (turnip rooted) type: Hamburg (grown for an enlarged edible root).

Lactuca sativa

Last revised February 11, 2010
 

Lettuce is produced on both mineral and muck (organic) soils. Production practices and varieties are quite different for each soil type. This guide is directed to mineral soil production unless indicated otherwise.
Four morphological types of lettuce dominate U.S. production, these are crisphead, cos (or romaine), leaf, and butterhead. Two others, stem and Latin are rarely found, although stem lettuce may be found in Oriental food stores.

Cucumis melo

 Last revised February 11, 2010

Pisum sativum

 Last revised February 12, 2010

The Oriental edible-pod pea or Chinese Pod Pea is also known as Snow Pea and Sugar Pea. These are all flat-podded peas that are hand picked and are available fresh or as a frozen vegetable and used in Oriental dishes.

Brassica rapaBrassica juncea, various other species

Last revised February 10, 2010

This guide contains information on mustard grown for greens and on condiment mustard. General information on condiment mustard types and varieties is at the end of this guide while specific comments on condiment mustard production are identified seperately in the sections below.

Pisum sativum

 Last revised February 12, 2010

Slicing (Fresh Market) Cucumbers

Cucumis sativus

Last revised February 4, 2010


Note: This file contains information specific to slicing cucumbers. For more detail on cucumber cultural methods, including fertilizers, pollination, and pest control, see Pickling Cucumbers.
Many excellent cucumbers are available. Flowers may be monoecious (separate male and female flowers on the same plant) and gynoecious (plants with only female flowers) and predominantly female (PF) types.

Cichorium endivia

Last revised February 10, 2010

VARIETIES (approximately 90 days)

Endive (curled, deeply cut, leaf types): Green-curled: Lorca, Ruffec (resists cold and wet conditions), Salad King. For trial: Large Green-curled White-ribbed, White Curled, Frisan, Wallonne Frisan (resistant to low temperatures), De Meaux, Crispy Green (heat resistant). 
"Baby" endive: Tosca. For trial: Galia.

 Brassica oleracea (Gemmifera Group)

Last revised January 12, 2010

VARIETIES (approximately 100-180 days from transplanting).

See the Vegetable Variety Selection Resources page to find varieties that have been shown to perform well in the Pacific NW. 

IMPORTANT

Before planting this Crucifer crop, consider the following important factors:

Garlic for Production of Planting Stock

Allium sativum


Last modified February 5, 2010

Note: The information in this file is specific to production of garlic for planting stock, as suggested for growers producing garlic for the dehydration industry. More information on garlic types, cultural practices, and pest control can be found in the file Garlic.

 Pickling Cucumbers

Cucumis sativus

Last revised February 3, 2010

Note: This file contains information specific to pickling cucumbers. For more detail on cucumber cultural methods, including fertilizers, pollination, and pest control, see Slicing Cucumbers.
Many excellent cucumbers are available. Flowers may be monoecious (separate male and female flowers on the same plant) and gynoecious (plants with only female flowers) and predominantly female (PF) types.

 Brassica oleracea (Capitata Group)

 Last revised January,14 2010

VARIETIES (approximately 75 days for early varieties, 90 days for mid-season, to over 120 days for late large-headed varieties).

Photo credit: Alex Stone, Oregon State University

Cucumis sativus

Last revised February 3, 2010

Commercial greenhouse vegetable production is an exacting and costly enterprise. Only expert management can prevent large-scale financial losses. Publications providing general information are available from libraries. Although several companies offer package investment opportunities, supplying equipment, materials and advice, none of these can guarantee success. In greenhouse production there is no substitute for experience.


Excellent publications with in-depth information are:

Allium sativum

Last revised February 5, 2010

Chinese Cabbage and leafy greens, Brassica species

Last revised February 1, 2010

Beta vulgaris

Last revised February 10, 2010

VARIETIES (round beets require 60-70 days and cylindrical beets 70-80 days depending on planting date, sizes desired and season).

Processing Beets

Processor specifies; varieties used are: Detroit Short Top and other strains such as Ruby Ball and Scarlet Supreme. Hybrid: Red Ace F1 (Cercospora tolerant). For trial, round: Big Red, Pacemaker III, Warrior. For trial, cylindrical: Forono and Cyndor (half long), CXA 9026, Cylindra, Formanova.

Brassica oleracea (Italica Group)

Last revised January 12, 2010

Broccoli, also known as Calabrese in England and much of Europe, is closely related to cauliflower, cabbage, brussels sprouts, and kohlrabi. There is considerable confusion in the scientific and lay literature regarding exact nomenclature. All these Brassicas will intercross readily and are classified in the same genus and species.

Eruca vesicaria ssp. sativa

Last modified February 10, 2010

Arugula (arrugula) is a tangy mustard green, also known as Rocket, Mediterranean Salad, Rucola or Roquette in Europe, also as Gharghir in the Middle East. Arugula is now popular as a gourmet salad green.

VARIETIES

Arugula, Rocket, Roquette. For other greens see separate file Mustard Greens. All are quick to mature (approximately 40-50 days).

Cynara cardunculus

 Last revised January 14, 2010

Cardoon is a perennial, closely related to globe artichoke. It is prized by people from the Mediterranean countries for its unique flavor. The young tender leaf mid-ribs and immature flower stalks are used. The plant hearts are sometimes blanched like celery stalks (maturing in September).

Asparagus officinalis

Last modified January 4, 2010

Carrots--Eastern Oregon

Daucus carota

Last revised January 14, 2010

 Sweet Corn for Fresh Market

Zea mays

Last revised February 3, 2010.


Note: This file contains only information specific to production of sweet corn for fresh market. For more information on sweet corn genetic types and isolation classes, cultural practices, and fertilizer needs, see the file Sweet Corn for Processing.

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