News and Events

Publications

Stone, A., B. Baker, E. Brown Rosen, E. Sideman, A. M. Shelton, B. Caldwell and C. Smart, 2009. Organic Management of Late Blight of Potato and Tomato with Copper Products. eOrganic article. Available at http://www.extension.org/article/18351.

December 31, 2005

Project Objectives 1. Develop and evaluate a Pilot IPM scouting program for the WSCB in snap beans 2. Determine the seasonal aggregation and movement patterns within diversified vegetable cropping systems 3. Evaluate the potential for “trap and kill” strategies as cultural control components of an IPM program for the WSCB in western Oregon vegetable cropping systems

Cox, B.H., 2009. Training Systems and Pruning in Organic Tomato Production. eOrganic article. Available at http://www.extension.org/article/18647

Stone, A., 2009. Organic Vegetable Production: Farm Case Studies, Systems Descriptions, and Farmer Interviews. eOrganic article. Available at http://www.extension.org/article/18364

December 1, 2010

Objectives for 2010 and Accomplishments:

Conduct a field trial to evaluate the use of UV seed disinfestation on carrot growth and disease levels

Seed-borne pathogen levels were reduced in one carrot seed line when treated with UV light. That same line had the largest reduction in pathogen levels in healthy leaf tissue but the difference was not strongly significant (P = 0.068). Disease levels were reduced in one seed line but overall Xanthomonas populations and disease in the field were inconsistent.

 

December 1, 2010

 

Title: Green Bean Breeding and Evaluation

Project Leaders: Brian Yorgey, Food Science and Technology, Jim Myers, Horticulture

Project Dates: July 1, 2010 - June 30, 2011

Project Funding: $40,288 breeding – Myers, $11,233 processing - Yorgey

December 1, 2010

Principal Investigator: Cynthia M. Ocamb, Ext. Specialist & Associate Professor, Botany and Plant Pathology, OSU – Corvallis
Co-investigator: Nathan Miller, Postdoctoral Research Assistant, BPP, OSU
Collaborators: Jim Myers (Dept. of Horticulture, OSU) and Rogers Brand Vegetable Seed

 

December 1, 2010

Objective: Breed improved Bush Blue Lake green bean varieties with:

a. White and gray mold resistance
b. Improved plant architecture
c. High economic yield
d. Improved pod quality (including straightness, color, smoothness, texture, flavor and quality retention, and delayed seed size devel-opment)
e. Tolerance to abiotic stresses
Improve seed quality of materials in the breeding program to provide greater re-sistance to mechanical injury and low germination issues.

December 1, 2010

Objective: Identify sweet corn hybrids with suitable processing quality that have high, stable yields and tolerance to root rot disease complex.

May 1, 1987

Overwintered onions in the Willamette Valley are seeded in early September for harvest the following spring. Strong growth in the spring is essential for producing high value jumbo bulbs. However, air and soil temperatures in the spring are less than optimal, possibly limiting response to fertilizers.

February 1, 1985

Satisfactory growth of annual transplants can occur in soilless media made up of a wide range of components. Peat-vermiculite mixes have been popular for many crops but the high cost of these components stimulated a search for substitutes. Each geographic area produces waste products which have potential as media components. Bark, woodchips, straw, cinders, nut shells, grains hulls, and many others have been incorporated successfully into growing media. However, the price and availability of these products vary with the economic health of the industry producing the waste.

April 1, 1982

Poor stand establishment is often a limiting factor in vegetable production. Soil crusting or high mechanical resistance (MR) to seedling emergence is caused by destruction of soil aggregates and contributes to poor stands on many soils. Small-seeded crops such as carrots, lettuce, onions, and the cabbage family lack the seedling vigor necessary to penetrate a cohesive crust.

April 1, 1981

Vegetable yields are, within limits, proportional to the initial stand establishment of the crop, i.e. the percentage of seed which successfully germinates, emerges, and commences sunlight-dependent growth. Improvements in stands should increase yields, reduce thinning labor, and may reduce variability in produce size and maturity at harvest. The purpose of this experiment was to determine the effects of soil pH and type (neutral, basic, acid-forming) of N fertilizer on stand establishment of several small-seeded vegetables.

May 1, 1987

Experiments at the North Willamette Experiment Station in 1979 and 1980 indicated that, for N applied as ammonium nitrate at 160 pounds N/acre, sweet corn yields were increased by delaying application of most of the N until the corn was 10 to 12 inches tall. These experiments were at fairly high levels of early season irrigation, and the lower yields when all N was applied at planting may have been caused by leaching of nitrate-N out of the root zone. In a trial in 1984, however, splitting the N application did not increase yield with ammonium nitrate as N source.

February 1, 1987

Obtaining vigorous and early growth in the spring is essential to achieve large bulb size and profitable yields of overwintered onions. However, soil and air temperatures are usually less than optimal during the spring growth period, possibly limiting response to fertilizers.

December 31, 2008

Objective: Identify sweet corn hybrids with suitable processing quality that have high, stable yields and tolerance to root rot disease complex.

December 31, 2007

Cancellation of the registration of an effective bean mold fungicide, Ronilan, occurred at the end of the 2005 growing season. Finding equivalent alternatives for use in snap bean is critical. The goal of the project is to continue evaluations of alternative fungicides for their effectiveness in controlling White Mold (Sclerotinia sclerotiorum) and Gray Mold (Botrytis cinerea) on snap bean.

March 1, 2009

OSU Vegetable Variety Trials 2008

Vegetables: beets, broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, corn, cucumbers, greens, kohlrabi, lettuce, melons, onions and shallots, potatoes, pumpkins and gourds, radishes, spinach, squash, swiss chard, tomatoes, turnips, watermelons
Authors:  Peter Boches, Miles Barrett, Shawna Zimmerman, Deborah Kean, and Jim Myers, Oregon State University

 

December 31, 1998

Objectives:

  • To determine the production and processing potential of new introductions of sweet corn.
February 1, 1987

1. Varieties. Overwinter varieties must be winter-hardy and resistant to bolting after exposure to cold weather. They should be able to stand several months of light frosts and short periods as low as 0 oF. Bulb formation must start when daylength is between 10 and 13 hours. Storage quality is not of great importance since the crop should be marketed before the spring-seeded crop matures in September.

April 1, 1986

Seven varieties were direct-seeded on July 13, 1977. All varieties except Pinnacle (Asmer Seed Co.) were from Elsoms, Ltd. Plot size was one 24-foot row with the stand thinned to approximately one foot between plants. An additional 225 pounds/acre of ammonium nitrate (34-0-0) was applied on February 2, 1978. Harvest commenced on March 16 and heads were harvested two or three times per week until May 8.

December 31, 1998

Objectives:

  • To evaluate the agronomic performance of new and established sweet corn varieties at the Malheur Experiment Station, Ontario, OR. 
April 1, 1982

The purpose of these trials was to obtain and evaluate cultivars of cauliflower for summer harvest. The major desired quality is heat tolerance: the ability to withstand high temperatures without ricing and to maintain the high curd quality typical of autumn-harvested cauliflower. A second desired quality is long wrapper leaves for self-blanching. Tying leaves must be minimized.

The purpose of this project was to obtain and evaluate varieties of cauliflower for summer harvest. The major desired quality is heat tolerance: the ability to withstand high temperatures without ricing and to maintain the high curd quality typical of autumn-harvested cauliflower. A second desired quality is long wrapper leaves for self-blanching.

April 1, 1982

In northern states, spinach is normally planted in early spring for late spring harvest or in summer for autumn harvest. Spring plantings are often limited by the difficulty of working cold, wet soils and many cultivars bolt in the long daylengths of late spring. Summer crops must be established during periods of very high soil temperature and low soil moisture and require frequent irrigation. Some Willamette Valley growers have successfully planted spinach in late summer for autumn harvest or in autumn for early spring harvest.

April 1, 1982

Local growers and processors could benefit by introduction of new crops into the Willamette Valley. Currently, processors of pickling peppers import their needs from more southerly growing areas. Local production has been thought to be limited by lack of adapted cultivars, poor yields, or quality problems. The following trial was undertaken to evaluate the yield potential of four pepper cultivars collected by the Steinfeld's Co., and to investigate the use of ethephon as a ripening agent for cherry type peppers.

Methods

April 1, 1981

The purpose of this experiment was to evaluate the performance of several Japanese onion cultivars in overwinter trials. The Willamette Valley appears to have a suitable climate for production of spring-harvested onions if bolting, disease, and weed control problems can be overcome. Previous experiments at the North Willamette Station have indicated that late August planting dates are superior to September planting dates for maximum yields. With a June harvest, this would allow double-cropping the onion ground.

Methods

The purpose of these experiments was to evaluate the performance of several Japanese, French, and American onion varieties in overwintering trials. Willamette Valley growers need to improve their competitive position in onion production. One possible method is to overwinter plants for late spring or early summer harvest. The major needs are to find varieties which are sufficiently winter hardy and which resist bolting, and to determine the correct planting time. Weed and disease control also poses problems.

Methods

April 1, 1982

The purpose of these experiments was to evaluate the performance of several onion (Allium cepa L.) cultivars in overwinter trials. The Willamette Valley appears to have a suitable climate for production of overwintered onions if bolting, disease, and weed control problems can be overcome. Previous experiments at the North Willamette Station have indicated that late August or early September planting dates are superior to later planting dates for maximum yields. With a June or July harvest, this might allow another crop on the onion ground both before planting and after harvest.

April 1, 1982

This report deals with the continuation of a series of tests of overwinter cauliflower (Brassica oleracea L. var. botrytis) production which began in 1977. Previous research established the feasibility of overwinter cauliflower production in the Willamette Valley and centered on cultivar and planting date trials, and the effect of spring-applied N on yields. The 1980-81 experiments reported here included a cultivar trial and a planting date trial.

This trial included several sweet or bell pepper varieties which have been grown in the Valley for several years, new releases from seed companies, new hot pepper lines from the New Mexico State University breeding program, and a few common hot pepper types. Of the 32 varieties tested, 7 were hot or chile types, the remainder bell or other sweet peppers. Qualities desired are earliness, good yield potential, large and attractive fruit, and strong growth habit with good fruit cover.

Methods

Published March 2006
OSU Extension Publication Series # EM 8906-E
Length: 4 pages
View Article Online
Also available from OSU Extension Linn County Office 541-967-3871

Colley, M., 2009. Selection and Roguing in Organic Seed Production . eOrganic article. Available at http://www.extension.org/article/18447.

December 31, 1997

OBJECTIVES FOR 1997:

  • Evaluate the impact of cover crops and soil tillage alternatives on survival of sclerotia in snap beans at two depths.
  • Evaluate the impact of cover crops and soil tillage on white mold incidence in snap beans.
  • Evaluate sclerotia survivability in varied cover crop residues.
December 31, 1997

Objectives

  • Compare potential of fertilizer impregnated with Goal and pyridate (Tough herbicide) for postemergence weed control in direct seeded broccoli and cauliflower.
  • Evaluate impact of soil moisture and tillage schedule on Goal efficacy.

Reiten, J. and J. Navazio, 2009. Organic Carrot, Onion, and Beet Seed Maturation and Harvest in the Pacific Northwest and California . eOrganic article. Available at http://www.extension.org/article/18446.

Reiten, J., 2009. Seed Production Contracting: Guidelines for Organic Seed Producers . eOrganic article. Available at http://www.extension.org/article/18333.

December 31, 1997

For bean production in the Willamette Valley, perhaps one of the most obvious objectives is resistance to white mold (Sclerotinia) since this pathogen is difficult to control using chemicals and no native resistance has been found in common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris). It has been shown that the production of oxalic acid by the fungus Sclerotinia is the primary cause of pathogenicity. If the oxalic acid can be degraded rapidly by the plant, the symptoms of infection can be inhibited.

Objectives:

December 31, 1997

Objectives:

  • Breed Bush Blue Lake green bean varieties with high economic yield.
  • Improve pod characteristics including straightness, color, smoothness, texture, flavor and quality retention, and combine with delayed seed size development.
  • Incorporate white mold tolerance, and improve root rot tolerance while maintaining resistance to bean common mosaic virus.
  • Initiate populations to facilitate molecular marker assisted selection of desirable horticultural traits.
  • Evaluate novel genetic traits of potential benefit.
December 31, 1997

Objectives

The basic objective of the processing component of this research is to support the green bean breeding program being carried out by Dr. Jim Myers in the Horticulture Department. The specific objectives are:

December 31, 1998

Funding was used to establish, evaluate, and analyze data from sweet corn field plots established on the Jim Belden farm near Stayton. Twenty hybrids with se or su endosperm were evaluated for resistance to root/crown rot. Ears were also evaluated for processing quality.

Objectives:

  • Characterize su and se sweet corn hybrids for reaction to root/crown rot. 

Cooperator: M. Powelson, Botany and Plant Pathology

 

Colley, M., 2009. Plant Breeding for Organic Systems. eOrganic article. Available at http://www.extension.org/article/18448.

Colley, M., A. Stone, and L. Brewer, 2009. General Specialty Organic Seed Production Resources. eOrganic article. Available at http://www.extension.org/article/18335.

Colley, M., 2009. Isolation Distances and Pinning Maps in Organic Seed Production . eOrganic article. Available at http://www.extension.org/article/18435.

Du Toit, L., and E. Gatch, 2009. Disease Management in Organic Seed Production. eOrganic article. Available at http://www.extension.org/article/18660

December 31, 1998

Objective:

  • The objective of the trial was to collect samples of broccoli grown in plots to which pendimethalin had been applied. The samples were to be analyzed in order to establish the level of the herbicide remaining at harvest in comparison to unsprayed broccoli plants. The results were to be included in a petition to EPA requesting a tolerance for pendimethalin residues in all head-forming brassicas.
December 31, 1998

Objectives

This project has two main objectives:

  • 1) Provide a real-time monitoring and reporting system to provide decision support for pest management to processed vegetable growers in W. Oregon,
  • 2) Provide the long term research basis to better understand pest outbreaks that can be used to improve implementation of objective 1. 

Cooperators: Jim Todd, Ed Peachey, Dan McGrath, Glenn Fisher