Oregon farmers and processors grow and process many vegetable crops, including snap beans, sweet corn, onions, squash, beets, carrots, cauliflower and broccoli. In 2010, Oregon farmers grew 17,320 acres of sweet corn for processing for a value of almost $15 million, and 17,000 acres of snap beans at a value of more than $20 million. 

This page aggregates information relevant to this grower group. Search by crop and topic for research reports, extension bulletins, videos and webinars. To search ONLY OPVC reports, go to the OPVC home page.

 

FeaturesPepper plants

Oregon Processed Vegetable Commission

VegNet

Root rot of sweet corn

Wildlife Habitat Conservation

White mold of snap bean

 

Videos

Publications

December 31, 2014

This research has demonstrated that liming clubroot infected soils to a pH ≥7.1 is an effective practice for reducing both the incidence and severity of clubroot. Liming does not kill the pathogen but rather prevents disease spores from infecting the plant. This research demonstrated that highly reactive calcitic lime products could be substituted for hydrated lime as they effectively raise the pH of the soil to the target pH of ≥7.1 within a week after application. The project also demonstrated that boron and Serenade drenches did not suppress clubroot under field conditions.

January 6, 2016

Prices paid for sweet corn are low relative to the cost of producing the crop, and every strategy possible must be used to maximize net return. Two strategies used to enhance profitability but that have received little research attention under Western Oregon conditions are the use of pop-up fertilizers and increased plant populations. Despite indications that popup fertilizers improve early-season growth, concrete evidence that these fertilizers ultimately enhance growth and yield are often lacking. Seeding density also can be increased to improve crop yield up to a point, but intraspecific competitive ability and the competitive stress tolerance of varieties currently produced in the Willamette Valley has not been demonstrated.

December 31, 2016

Experiments in Corvallis, OR and Pasco, WA evaluated the potential of bicyclopyrone, tolpyralate, halosulfuron and EPTC for weed control in carrots. Bicyclopyrone and tolpyralate significantly reduced plant stand, injured carrots, and reduced yield at all three rates. Only bicyclopyrone at 0.875 oz/A and tolpyralate at 1 oz/A provided yield within range of linuron, prometryn, and EPTC treatments. The prometryn treatment yielded the most carrots, followed closely by linuron and EPTC. Halosulfuron killed all carrots. Weed control with bicyclopyrone and tolpyralate was similar when comparing within treatments with equal carrot injury. A possible exception was that tolpyralate may have controlled crabgrass better than bicyclopyrone. Prometryn control of hairy nightshade lasted longer than linuron.

March 14, 2014

Current snap bean phosphorus (P) fertilizer recommendations for Oregon are higher than those given in other extension publications across the US. Despite the scale and importance of snap bean production in Oregon, little attention has been paid to the phosphorus (P) utilization of this crop over the past 30 years in the Willamette Valley.Due to changes in production practices, the increase in the price of P fertilizers, trends towards greater sustainability, and soil test P (STP) values commonly greater than 50 ppm Bray (the level at which a crop response to P fertilizer is unlikely), there is interest in revisiting the current recommendations to better balance P inputs/outputs.

December 31, 2014

Processors need broccoli with better quality traits than what is available in cultivars developed for California and Mexico fresh markets. Farmers need to reduce labor costs of broccoli production but mechanizing harvest. Most contemporary commercially available cultivars are not suitable for either mechanical harvest or processing. The objective of the OSU broccoli breeding program is to develop broccoli varieties adapted to western Oregon with suitable quality and high yields. The program operates on a one year cycle where cuttings from the field are taken into the greenhouse in the fall where they are rooted and hand crossed and self-pollinated to produce seed for the next generation. Seed is harvested in May and June and used to plant trials for fall evaluation.

January 6, 2016

Oregon is the second largest producer of processed green beans, and cultivars are needed that are adapted to western Oregon. The types that have traditionally been used are the bush blue lake (BBL) green beans with high yields, excellent processing quality. On the other hand, then need improvement in plant architecture, disease resistance (especially to white mold), and are genetically isolated from other green beans. The primary objective of the OSU green bean breeding program is to develop high yielding and high quality BBL green beans with high levels of white mold resistance. In 2015, a yield and processing trial of 18 advanced lines was conducted. An additional commercial trial with 27 entries was also grown and evaluated. Seven advanced lines are undergoing intense scrutiny for release as the first partially white mold resistant lines commercially available.

December 31, 2016

This year, we commemorate 20 years of OSU’s VegNet (1996-2016). VegNet has become a well-known and utilized resource for processed vegetable growers, researchers, and Ag professionals throughout Oregon. This regional program provides weekly activity reports for common broccoli, cauliflower, sweet corn, and snap bean pests. The main goal of the program is to serve as an early warning and detection network, to inform growers of potential pest outbreaks that may warrant increased field scouting and action. Notable trends from 2016 include extensive Cabbage Looper pressure, a continued increase of Cucumber Beetle species (12-spot and striped), and new Armyworms to be aware of. It is becoming apparent that pest activity can vary widely between field sites. Although the regional average is useful, it should not be the only metric used when considering if and how to treat for pests.

December 31, 2014

Prices paid for sweet corn are low relative to the cost of producing the crop, and every strategy possible must be used to maximize net return. Two strategies used to enhance profitability but that have received little research attention under Western Oregon conditions are the use of pop-up fertilizers and increased plant populations. Despite indications that popup fertilizers improve early-season growth, concrete evidence that these fertilizers ultimately enhance growth and yield are often lacking. Seeding density also can be increased to improve crop yield up to a point, but intraspecific competitive ability and the competitive stress tolerance of varieties currently produced in the Willamette Valley are poorly understood.

January 6, 2016

Processors need broccoli with better quality traits than what is available in cultivars developed for California and Mexico fresh markets. Farmers need to reduce labor costs of broccoli production by mechanizing harvest. Most contemporary commercially available cultivars are not suitable for either mechanical harvest or processing. The objective of the OSU broccoli breeding program is to develop broccoli varieties adapted to western Oregon with suitable quality and high yields. The program operates on a one year cycle where cuttings from the field are taken into the greenhouse in the fall where they are rooted and hand crossed and self-pollinated to produce seed for the next generation. Seed is harvested in May and June and used to plant trials for fall evaluation. In 2015, nine experimental hybrids were planted in a replicated yield trial, which also included two commercial check hybrids and a new exserted commercial hybrid from Seminis.

December 31, 2016

Several new powdered limestone products that are more finely ground (smaller particle size distribution) than products historically used have become commercially available. A major factor influencing the effectiveness of a liming material is its particle size distribution, with smaller particles reacting more quickly. Because lime efficiency estimates for various particle size fractions were established in the 1950’s, there is a need to evaluate current guidelines to determine if they adequately predict liming efficiency for these new products. The objective of this study was to assess the reactivity of commercially available powdered lime products (both calcitic and dolomitic) and various particle size fractions over a year with the goal of evaluating current OSU lime guidelines.

December 31, 2014

For the past 18 years, processed vegetable growers in the Willamette Valley, OR have had a vital partner in crop pest monitoring – Oregon State University’s VegNet. This regional pest monitoring program provides weekly activity reports for common broccoli, cauliflower, sweet corn, and snap bean pests. Data is published on www.oregonvegetables.com and is available as an email subscription newsletter. The main goal of the program is to provide an early warning to growers of potential outbreaks that may warrant increased field scouting and action.

January 6, 2016

Urea is a common nitrogen fertilizer for sweet corn production. This two year project evaluated commercially available urea additives for their potential to provide crop production and environmental benefits. Specifically, experiments were designed to evaluate the efficacy of urea fertilizer products containing a urease inhibitor (Agrotain Ultra), or nitrification inhibitors, or a polymer coated urea product (ESN). Products containing nitrification inhibitors (SuperU and Instinct) were evaluated only in 2014, and found to have efficacy similar to ESN in slowing conversion of urea to leachable nitrate-N. The control treatment in all studies was granular urea without additives.

January 6, 2016

The resistance to white mold obtained so far in snap beans has been derived from NY 6020, which provides partial physiological resistance. Under light disease pressure, plants will show few if any symptoms, while under heavy pressure, the plants may show a moderate level of infection (whereas susceptible BBL types will be 100% molded). Cultivars with this form of resistance would not need any supplemental control with fungicides, whereas under heavy pressure, fungicides might be required, but at a reduced frequency or quantity. The objective of this study was to determine whether OR6771 would benefit from an integrated mold control approach that included fungicides typically used in snap production, Topsin M and Rovral tankmixed.

December 31, 2016

The market for organic vegetables is increasing. As conventional farmers transition fields to organics to meet this demand, there is a need for better organic nutrient management guidance, especially for nitrogen (N). Organic N management is more challenging than conventional N management due to a higher level of uncertainty surrounding the N supplying capacity of an organically managed soil as well as the constraints of organic fertilizers (supply, application timing and placement, and uncertainty of release rate and amount). As a result, conventional nutrient management strategies may not be appropriate for organically managed systems. With organic N management there is often a higher risk of excessive nitrate-N loss and higher risk of not achieving economic yield targets.

August 12, 2013

The following is a method for cheaply and quickly determining a soil’s nitrate status for the purpose of determining the midseason sidedress fertilizer rate for sweet corn. For information on the pre-sidedress nitrate test (PSNT), see OSU’s nutrient management guide EM 9010-E (Sweet Corn- Western Oregon). The ‘Quick Test’ (QT) has been in use for years in the Salinas Valley of California with good results. Compared to a traditional laboratory test, it is cheaper and test results can be obtained within hours of sample collection. Although this method is semi-quantitative, results from the QT are well correlated with laboratory results.

December 31, 2014

Report to the Oregon Processed Vegetable CommissionOregon is the second largest producer of processed green beans, and cultivars are needed that are adapted to western Oregon. The types that have traditionally been used are the bush blue lake (BBL) green beans with high yields, excellent processing quality. On the other hand, then need improvement in plant architecture, disease resistance (especially to white mold), and are genetically isolated from other green beans. The primary objective of the OSU green bean breeding program is to develop high yielding and high quality BBL green beans with high levels of white mold resistance.

January 6, 2016

The goals of this project were to determine 1) if liming controls clubroot, 2) the pH that must be attained to achieve commercially viable levels of control, and 3) how best to lime (materials, timing, incorporation strategies) to achieve that pH. Research conducted in 2014 showed that liming clubroot infected soils to a pH ≥7.1 is an effective practice for reducing both the incidence and severity of clubroot. Liming does not kill the pathogen but rather prevents disease spores from infecting the plant. In 2015 the research was focused on the relationship between disease incidence and severity when pH <7.1,better understanding when to apply lime, and how to incorporate to maximize pH change.

December 31, 2014

The overall objective of this multi-year project is to maximize nutrient use efficiency without compromising bean yield and quality. This year’s project objectives were to: 1) evaluate crop response to P fertilizer at current soil P test levels in grower fields; 2) generate phosphorus (P) potassium (K), and nitrogen (N) nutrient budgets (fertilizer inputs vs. harvest removal); and 3) evaluate relationships among bean root rot disease, plant P uptake, biomass allocation (pods vs. leaves).

December 31, 2014

Despite the availability of several herbicides in table beets, weed control is still problematic. UpBeet (triflusulfuron; DuPont) was recently labeled, but the labeled timings and rate are inadequate for optimum weed control, particularly for lambsquarters. An experiment was placed at the OSU Vegetable Research Farm to determine the tolerance of 2-leaf table beets to UpBeet when applied at double the currently labeled rate of 0.5 oz/A, and to beets at the cotyledon stage at 0.5 oz/A.

January 6, 2016

The overall objective of this three-year project was to provide farmers with updated fertilizer recommendations for snap beans. The goal was to maximize nutrient use efficiency without compromising bean yield and quality. This was accomplished by partnering with commercial bean growers to conduct on-farm research as well as conducting trials at OSU’s Vegetable Research Farm.

December 31, 2016

Processors need broccoli with better quality traits than what is available in cultivars developed for California and Mexico fresh markets. Farmers need to reduce labor costs of broccoli production by mechanizing harvest. Most contemporary commercially available cultivars are not suitable for either mechanical harvest or processing. The objective of the OSU broccoli breeding program is to develop broccoli varieties adapted to western Oregon with suitable quality and high yields. The program operates on a one year cycle where cuttings from the field are taken into the greenhouse in the fall where they are rooted and hand crossed and self-pollinated to produce seed for the next generation. Seed is harvested in May and June and used to plant trials for fall evaluation.

January 1, 1978

In 1978 a survey was done in the Willamette Valley to explore the relationship between soil nutrient values and tissue nutrient concentrations.

January 6, 2016

Oregon State University’s VegNet is a regional pest monitoring program that provides activity reports for 10 common insect pests that affect broccoli, cabbage, cauliflower, sweet corn, and snap beans. Crop pests are sampled weekly and raw data is compared to activity trends from previous years. Regional pest monitoring helps growers and agricultural field representatives adjust their scouting effort when an outbreak is detected, and the combination of area-wide monitoring plus field-specific scouting reduces risk of crop loss. Reports are available on www.oregonvegetables.com, and sent via an email newsletter that currently serves over 400 subscribers. In 2015, increases in pest pressure were noted for black cutworm, spotted cucumber beetle, cabbage white butterfly, bertha armyworm, and diamondback moth.

December 31, 2016

The resistance to white mold obtained so far in snap beans has been derived from NY 6020, which provides partial physiological resistance. Under light disease pressure, plants will show few if any symptoms, while under heavy pressure, the plants may show a moderate level of infection (whereas susceptible BBL types will be 100% molded). Cultivars with this form of resistance would not need any supplemental control with fungicides, whereas under heavy pressure, fungicides might be required, but at a reduced frequency or quantity. The objective of this study was to determine whether OR6771 would benefit from an integrated mold control approach that included fungicides typically used in snap production, Topsin M and Rovral tankmixed.

December 31, 2014

Enhanced efficiency fertilizer (EEF) technologies have the potential to improve the crop N use efficiency (NUE) as well as minimize negative environmental losses compared to conventional fertilizers. The EEF fertilizer products consist of urea plus additives (to inhibit N loss). The major pathways for N loss in our sweet corn cropping systems are 1) N leached below the root zone as water soluble nitrate-N (NO3-N), and 2) gaseous ammonia loss (NH3-N) to the atmosphere following a surface urea application.Field studies and a laboratory incubation study were conducted in 2014 to evaluate the potential for benefit from EEF products via reduced nitrate-N leaching. Three products were evaluated: ESN (polymer coated urea), SuperU (prilled urea containing both a urease and nitrification inhibitor), and Instinct (urea + nitrification inhibitor).

January 6, 2016

This project is evaluating interseeding of crop crops to improve cover crop establishment after late harvested crops such as sweet corn and processing squash. In Project 1 at the OSU Vegetable Research Farm, a cover crop of oat and crimson clover produced the most cover crop biomass when interseeded at V4 compared to V6 and V8 plantings but may have reduced corn yield slightly because of competition for water or nutrients. Applying Laudis herbicide immediately after interseeding of the cover crop had no impact on cover crop establishment, even when seeds were broadcast on the soil surface and incorporated lightly. Clover did not emerge well in interseeded plots, possibly because it was planted too deeply. Clover establishment was best when seed was broadcast on the soil surface and incorporated with shallow tillage. Cover crop biomass in mid-December averaged less in interseeded plots than in fall-planted plots because the oat cover crops began to senesce.

December 31, 2016

Oregon vegetable processors are in need of improvements to the cost of harvesting broccoli and cauliflower, along with improvements to the quality of the vegetables being processed. The objectiveof this research project is to develop autonomous, mechanical harvesting solutions for the broccoli and cauliflower producer. This work is complementary to Oregon State University development of a new broccoli hybrid developed specifically for automated mechanical harvest.

Cucurbita, several species, and ornamental, wax, sponge gourd, etc.

Last revised February 12, 2010

Cucurbita pepo

Last revised February 12, 2010

Pisum sativum

 Last revised February 12, 2010

Peas in eastern Oregon are grown in the Blue Mountain area east of Pendleton to Milton-Freewater, mostly as dry-land production in rotation with wheat. More recently production has also been in the Hermiston area where soils may be more sandy and subject to wind erosion. Hermiston area production may be irrigated or non-irrigated.

Beta vulgaris

Last revised February 10, 2010

VARIETIES (round beets require 60-70 days and cylindrical beets 70-80 days depending on planting date, sizes desired and season).

Processing Beets

Processor specifies; varieties used are: Detroit Short Top and other strains such as Ruby Ball and Scarlet Supreme. Hybrid: Red Ace F1 (Cercospora tolerant). For trial, round: Big Red, Pacemaker III, Warrior. For trial, cylindrical: Forono and Cyndor (half long), CXA 9026, Cylindra, Formanova.

Sweet Corn for Processing

Zea mays

Last revised February 2, 2010.

TYPES

A number of genes affect sweetness in corn. These are recessive mutants of the starchy gene found in field corn (Su) and their modifiers, and other genes. Normal sweet corn has the recessive mutant of field corn (su). Modifiers and other genes include the sugary-extender gene (se) and the supersweet or shrunken gene (sh2). These make up three major genetic classes of importance in commercial production :

Phaseolus vulgaris

Last revised January 11, 2010.

VARIETIES (snapbeans require approximately 60-75 days to harvest, depending on season, planting date and variety).

Fresh Market

 Pickling Cucumbers

Cucumis sativus

Last revised February 3, 2010

Note: This file contains information specific to pickling cucumbers. For more detail on cucumber cultural methods, including fertilizers, pollination, and pest control, see Slicing Cucumbers.
Many excellent cucumbers are available. Flowers may be monoecious (separate male and female flowers on the same plant) and gynoecious (plants with only female flowers) and predominantly female (PF) types.

Carrots--Eastern Oregon

Daucus carota

Last revised January 14, 2010

Brassica oleracea (Italica Group)

Last revised January 12, 2010

Broccoli, also known as Calabrese in England and much of Europe, is closely related to cauliflower, cabbage, brussels sprouts, and kohlrabi. There is considerable confusion in the scientific and lay literature regarding exact nomenclature. All these Brassicas will intercross readily and are classified in the same genus and species.

Carrots--Western Oregon

Daucus carota

Last revised January 14, 2010
 

Zea mays

Last revised February 2, 2010

NOTE: This file contains only information specific to the production of baby corn. For a complete guide to sweet corn cultural practices, see Sweet Corn for Processing. For information on growing baby corn, see Baby Corn Production (produced by Washington State University).

Brassica oleracea (Botrytis Group)

Last revised February 1 , 2010.

Vicia faba

Last revised January 11, 2010

 Phaseolus lunatus

Last modified January 11, 2010

VARIETIES (approximately 80 to 100 days in lower Columbia Basin).


Very few lima beans are grown for fresh market in the Pacific Northwest. When grown for processing, varieties are specified by processor. Commercial lima bean production has generally been limited to east of the Cascade Mountains. Some varieties grown east of the Cascade Mountains are:

Small-seeded types: Packer DM (early), Maffei 15, Early Thorogreen, Kingston, Thaxter, Clarks Bush, Baby Lima, Wasatch.

2011 Pacific Northwest Insect Management Handbook, Copyright 2011 Oregon State University. Edited by Craig S. Hollingsworth.
OSU Extension Series#INSECT

The information in this linked  handbook is revised annually by the Extension Services of Oregon State University, Washington State University, and the University of Idaho

Available online. To order the print publication, go to http://extension.oregonstate.edu/catalog/abstract.php?seriesno=INSECT
 

Diamondback Moth (DBM) causes damage to cole crops in two ways: larvae chew holes in the foliage, and pupae contaminate heads. This page provides DBM news and updates as well as basic information,scouting and monitoring techniques, and management options.

Principle investigator: Jessica Green (OSU Horticulture)

VegNet is a regional pest monitoring and reporting network serving the Oregon processed vegetable industry, managed by the OSU Extension Service, and funded by the Oregon Processed Vegetable Commission. In the early spring of 2012, thirty six insect monitoring stations were established on cooperating farms located strategically throughout the Willamette Basin and maintained during the growing season.

The goals of the VegNet Regional Pest Monitoring and Reporting System are:

January 12, 2011

Report to the Oregon Processed Vegetable Commission

Jim Myers and Brian Yorgey

Objective: Breed improved Bush Blue Lake green bean varieties with:
a. White and gray mold resistance
b. Improved plant architecture
c. High economic yield
d. Improved pod quality (including straightness, color, smoothness, texture, flavor and quality retention, and delayed seed size devel-opment)
e. Tolerance to abiotic stresses

December 31, 2006

Report to the Oregon Processed Vegetable Commission

Jim Myers

Objectives: 1. Breed Bush Blue Lake green bean varieties with high economic yield and improved plant architecture. 2. Improve pod characteristics including straightness, color, smoothness, texture, flavor and quality retention, and combine with delayed seed size development. 3. Incorporate white mold resistance and improve root rot tolerance. 4. Map genes for resistance to white mold to facilitate marker aided selection.

December 31, 2008

Report to the Oregon Processed Vegetable Commission

Jim Myers

Objective: Breed improved Bush Blue Lake green bean varieties with: a. White and gray mold resistance b. Improved plant architecture c. High economic yield d. Improved pod quality (including straightness, color, smoothness, texture, flavor and quality retention, and delayed seed size development)

December 1, 2012

Report to the Oregon Processed Vegetable Commission

Authors: Jim Myers and Brian Yorgey

Objective: Breed improved Bush Blue Lake green bean varieties with:

December 31, 2009

Report to the Oregon Processed Vegetable Commission

Jim Myers and Brian Yorgy

Objectives: Breed improved Bush Blue Lake green bean varieties with: a. White and gray mold resistance b. Improved plant architecture c. High economic yield d. Improved pod quality (including straightness, color, smoothness, texture, flavor and quality retention, and delayed seed size development) e. Tolerance to abiotic stresses. Improve seed quality of materials in the breeding program to provide greater resistance to mechanical injury and low germination.

January 28, 2014

White mold is a serious foliar and pod disease of snap beans grown for processing in western Oregon as well as in all major snap bean production regions in the US. White mold has a wide host range as it is a pathogen on more than 400 plant species.

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