Specialty seed crops are important crops in Oregon, grown on more than 16000 acres and valued at more than 37 million dollars in 2010. In addition, seed crops add extraordinary beauty to the Oregon landscape. This page aggregates information on specialty seed production for Oregon farmers.

Features

Special Local Need registration for Rovral on Brassica seed crops

Integrative Seed Biology at Oregon State University

Willamette Valley Specialty Seed Association

Organic Seed Resource Guide (at eXtension)

Organic Seed Production Course (at eXtension)

Ohio State Seed ID website

Specialty seed photo gallery

 

Cosmos seed field, Silver Falls Seed. Credit: Alex Stone, OSU

Pacific Northwest (PNW) Extension Bulletins on specialty seed production

Available for purchase from https://cru84.cahe.wsu.edu/Default.aspx (search for "seed") (verified 20 Jan 2012).

  • Cabbage, Brussels sprouts, cauliflower, and kohlrabi seed production in the Pacific Northwest. M. L. Jarmin and R. E. Thornton. 1985. Pacific Northwest Cooperative Extension Publication 268.
  • Carrot, parsnip, and parsley seed production in the Pacific Northwest. W. R. Simpson, R. G. Beaver, W. M. Colt, and C. R. Baird. 1985. Pacific Northwest Cooperative Extension Publication 272.
  • Kale and collard seed production in the Pacific Northwest. M. L. Jarmin and R. E. Thornton. 1985. Pacific Northwest Cooperative Extension Publication 269.
  • Lettuce seed production in the Pacific Northwest. W. M. Colt, R. G. Beaver, W. R. Simpson, and C. R. Baird. 1985. Pacific Northwest Cooperative Extension Publication 273.
  • Mustard and chinese cabbage seed production in the Pacific Northwest. M. L. Jarmin and R. E. Thornton. 1985. Pacific Northwest Cooperative Extension Publication 270.
  • Radish seed production in the Pacific Northwest. W. M. Colt, R. G. Beaver, W. R. Simpson, and C. R. Baird. 1985. Pacific Northwest Cooperative Extension Publication 274.
  • Spinach seed production in the Pacific Northwest. M. L. Jarmin and R. E. Thornton. 1985. Pacific Northwest Cooperative Extension Publication 267.
  • Table beet and swiss chard seed production in the Pacific Northwest. M. L. Jarmin and R. E. Thornton. 1985. Pacific Northwest Cooperative Extension Publication 271.
  • Turnip and rutabaga seed production in the Pacific Northwest. N. S. Mansour, J. R. Baggett, and M. Jarmin. 1985. Pacific Northwest Cooperative Extension Publication 265.

 

 Videos

Publications

Stone, A., M. Colley, and L. Brewer, 2009. Government Agencies and Regulations: Resources for Organic Seed Producers. eOrganic article. Available at http://www.extension.org/article/18334.

2011 Pacific Northwest Insect Management Handbook, Copyright 2011 Oregon State University. Edited by Craig S. Hollingsworth.
OSU Extension Series#INSECT

The information in this linked  handbook is revised annually by the Extension Services of Oregon State University, Washington State University, and the University of Idaho

Available online. To order the print publication, go to http://extension.oregonstate.edu/catalog/abstract.php?seriesno=INSECT
 

January 28, 2014

White mold is a serious foliar and pod disease of snap beans grown for processing in western Oregon as well as in all major snap bean production regions in the US. White mold has a wide host range as it is a pathogen on more than 400 plant species.

August 30, 2014

this SLN registration is for management of black leg on Brassica seed crops

July 29, 2013

Clubroot is becoming an increasing problem on Willamette Valley vegetable farms. Most cultivated brassica crops (broccoli, cauliflower, cabbage, etc.) are highly susceptible to the disease, which is caused by the soilborne fungus Plasmodiophora brassicae. In severe cases it can cause significant crop losses, and heavily infested fields may be taken out of production. Once a field is infected, eliminating the pathogen is difficult if not impossible because its thick walled resting spores have been shown to remain viable in soil for up to 18 years. As a result, once pathogen populations have developed to economically damaging levels, the goal of the farmer is to manage rather than eradicate the disease. One effective control strategy is to raise the soil pH to ≥7.2 through liming.

Research report from OSU's North Willamette Research and Extension Center

Delbert Hemphill, Gary Reed, Oscar  Gutbrod, and Fred Crowe
Oregon State University

Introduction

Research report from OSU's North Willamette Research and Extension Center

Delbert Hemphill and Gary Reed
Oregon State University

Introduction

Control of virus-vectoring aphids is essential in potato seed production to exclude viruses such as potato virus Y (PVY) and leaf roll. Floating row covers might protect plants from insect attack, reducing the need for insecticides.

December 31, 2009

Report to the Oregon Processed Vegetable Commission

Dan McGrath
OSU Dept. of Horticulture

COOPERATORS: Manual Silveira and Jim Gill, NORPAC; Wayne Parker, Jason
White, and Neil MacInnes, National Frozen; Jon Brown, Truitt Bros; Larry and Ron
Pearmine Farm, Richard and Delbert Haener Farms, Mark and Mike Dickman Farm,
Skip Gray Farm, Matt and Gary Cook Farm, Hendricks Brothers Farm, Tom and Sam
Sweeney Farm. Technical support for this project was provided by Lydia Brown, OSU
Department of Horticulture.

Navazio, J., 2009. Why Organic Seed?. eOrganic article. Available at http://www.extension.org/article/18339

Skelton, E., 2009. Weed Seeds Commonly Found in Specific Vegetable Crops. eOrganic article. Available at http://www.extension.org/article/18445.

Colley, M., A. Stone, and L. Brewer, 2009. Weed Management in Organic Seed Production. eOrganic article. Available at http://www.extension.org/article/18659.

January 1, 2006

Myers, J.R. 2006.  Outcrossing Potential for Brassica Species, and Implications for Vegetable Crucifer Seed Crops of Growing Oilseed Brassicas in the Willamette Valley.  OSUES SR 1064.

Organic Seed Alliance recently released an extensive report that serves as the first comprehensive analysis of the challenges and opportunities in building the organic seed sector. The report, titled State of Organic Seed: Advancing the Viability and Integrity of Organic Seed Systems, is an ongoing project to monitor the status of organic seed systems in the United States. 

2010 Pacific Northwest Weed Management Handbook
Copyright 2010 Oregon State University. Series# WEED
Revised annually by the Extension Services of Oregon State University, Washington State University, and the University of Idaho

To order the print publication, go to http://extension.oregonstate.edu/catalog/abstract.php?seriesno=WEED
 

Colley, M. and B. Baker, 2009. Sourcing Certified Organic Seed and the National Organic Program Regulations. eOrganic article. Available at http://www.extension.org/article/18338

Stone, A., L. Brewer, and M. Colley, 2009. Non-Governmental Seed Testing Organizations. eOrganic article. Available at http://www.extension.org/article/18443

Sabry, E. , A. Garay, and E. Gatch, 2009. Seed Quality Testing and Certification: Resources Useful in Organic Seed Production . eOrganic article. Available at http://www.extension.org/article/18331.

Colley, M., A. Stone, and L. Brewer, 2009. Research and Education Organizations and Events Related to Organic Seed . eOrganic article. Available at http://www.extension.org/article/18444.

Gatch, E., 2009. Organic Seed Treatments and Coatings . eOrganic article. Available at http://www.extension.org/article/18952.

Navazio, J., F. Morton, M. Colley, A. Stone, and L. Brewer, 2009. Pollination and Fertilization in Organic Seed Production. eOrganic article. Available at http://www.extension.org/article/18434.

This free online tool on the OSU Extension Service Small Farms website compares the nutrient value and cost of cover crops, organic and synthetic fertilizers and compost. Use this Excel Calculator to develop well balanced and cost effective nutrient management programs for your farm. Developed by Nick Andrews, Dan Sullivan, Jim Julian and Kristin Pool. OSU Extension Series # EM 8936-E

Oregon farmers grow a wide variety of vegetable and flower seeds from radishes to California poppies. Find extension publications, books, and articles about specialty seed production topics by reading through the appropriate sections of the Organic Seed Resource Guide. In the future you will be able to search this site to find the resources cited in the Guide, but they are not yet uploaded as individual resources.

Colley, M., 2009. Selection and Roguing in Organic Seed Production . eOrganic article. Available at http://www.extension.org/article/18447.

Colley, M., 2009. Organic Seed Processing: Threshing, Cleaning and Storage. eOrganic article. Available at http://www.extension.org/article/18350.

Reiten, J. and J. Navazio, 2009. Organic Carrot, Onion, and Beet Seed Maturation and Harvest in the Pacific Northwest and California . eOrganic article. Available at http://www.extension.org/article/18446.

Reiten, J., 2009. Seed Production Contracting: Guidelines for Organic Seed Producers . eOrganic article. Available at http://www.extension.org/article/18333.

Johnson, K.B. and F. Morton, 2009. Keys to Disease Management in Organic Seed Crops. eOrganic article. Available at http://www.extension.org/article/18332.

Colley, M., 2009. Plant Breeding for Organic Systems. eOrganic article. Available at http://www.extension.org/article/18448.

Myers, J., 2009. Intellectual Property Protection: What Do I Need to Know When Growing and Breeding Organic Crops and Seed?. eOrganic article. Available at http://www.extension.org/article/18449.

Colley, M., A. Stone, and L. Brewer, 2009. General Specialty Organic Seed Production Resources. eOrganic article. Available at http://www.extension.org/article/18335.

Colley, M., 2009. Isolation Distances and Pinning Maps in Organic Seed Production . eOrganic article. Available at http://www.extension.org/article/18435.

Du Toit, L., and E. Gatch, 2009. Disease Management in Organic Seed Production. eOrganic article. Available at http://www.extension.org/article/18660

May 1, 1987

Control of virus-vectoring insects, particularly aphids, is essential in production of potatoes for seed to exclude viruses such as potato virus Y, leaf roll, and net necrosis. Seed production fields are heavily treated with insecticides to prevent virus transmission, but control is often inadequate. Floating row covers may protect plants from attack by insect vectors, reducing the need for insecticides. Row covers might also increase yield through their effect on air and soil temperatures around the plants.