News and Events

Publications

Zea mays

Last revised February 2, 2010

NOTE: This file contains only information specific to the production of baby corn. For a complete guide to sweet corn cultural practices, see Sweet Corn for Processing. For information on growing baby corn, see Baby Corn Production (produced by Washington State University).

Lactuca sativa

Last revised February 11, 2010
 

Lettuce is produced on both mineral and muck (organic) soils. Production practices and varieties are quite different for each soil type. This guide is directed to mineral soil production unless indicated otherwise.
Four morphological types of lettuce dominate U.S. production, these are crisphead, cos (or romaine), leaf, and butterhead. Two others, stem and Latin are rarely found, although stem lettuce may be found in Oriental food stores.

Cichorium intybus L. var. folosum

Last revised February 10, 2010

(See also file on Radicchio)

The terms "chicory" and "endive" are frequently interchanged because the "forced" product of Witloof chicory has been erroneously named French or Belgian endive. This information deals with the production of the forced Witloof chicory for chicons (4-6 inch, spindle-shaped heads or buds). Other synonyms are White Endive and Dutch chicory.

Spinacia oleracea

Last revised February 15, 2010

Spinach. Photo credit: Alex Stone, Oregon State University

Capsicum annuum and C. frutescens

Last revised February 12, 2010

Vicia faba

Last revised January 11, 2010

Daucus carota

Last revised January 14, 2010
 

Zea mays

Last revised February 3, 2010


Note: This file contains only information specific to production of sweet corn for fresh market. For more information on sweet corn genetic types and isolation classes, cultural practices, and fertilizer needs, see the file Sweet Corn for Processing.

 Anethum graveolens

 Last revised February 5, 2010

 VARIETIES (approximately 65 days)

 Boquet, Dukat (highly aromatic), Fernleaf, Mammoth. For trial: Long Island.

Cucumis melo

 Last revised February 11, 2010

Citrullus lanatus

Last revised February 11, 2010

Many new varieties of watermelons have been developed in recent years. Yellow and seedless types are finding an increasing share of the specialty watermelon market. It is estimated that seedless red and yellow varieties that were virtually unknown ten years ago, and represent about 5% of the market today will increase their market share substantially in the near future. Small excellent quality "icebox" melons are also becoming increasingly popular.

Sprouts

Last revised February 15, 2010

Allium cepa (Aggregatum Group)

Last revised February 15, 2010

VARIETIES AND PLANTING STOCK

Shallots are normally propagated from bulb divisions. In addition, true seed of shallots is now available in both red and yellow types.

Shallots propagated from bulb divisions:

French Red Shallot - red type is the most common dry shallot grown. Other yellow or white varieties include Griselle, Chicken Leg Shallot, and Dutch Yellow, but only the red shallot is important in the market.

Pisum sativum

Last revised February 12, 2010

The Oriental edible-pod pea or Chinese Pod Pea is also known as Snow Pea and Sugar Pea. These are all flat-podded peas that are hand picked and are available fresh or as a frozen vegetable and used in Oriental dishes.

Brassica oleracea (Botrytis Group)

Last revised February 1 , 2010

Zea mays (sweet corn for processing)

Last revised February 2, 2010

TYPES

A number of genes affect sweetness in corn. These are recessive mutants of the starchy gene found in field corn (Su) and their modifiers, and other genes. Normal sweet corn has the recessive mutant of field corn (su). Modifiers and other genes include the sugary-extender gene (se) and the supersweet or shrunken gene (sh2). These make up three major genetic classes of importance in commercial production :

 Solanum melongena

 Last revised February 5, 2010

VARIETIES (approximately 65-85 days from transplanting in the Willamette Valley).

See the Vegetable Variety Selection Resources page to find varieties that have been shown to perform well in the Pacific NW.

Eggplant. Photo credit: John McQueen, Oregon State University

Brassica rapaBrassica juncea, various other species

Last revised February 10, 2010

This guide contains information on mustard grown for greens and on condiment mustard. General information on condiment mustard types and varieties is at the end of this guide while specific comments on condiment mustard production are identified seperately in the sections below.

Brassica rapa (Rapifera Group)

Last revised February 10, 2010

VARIETIES(approximately 30 days for greens).

Shogoin (roots edible), Seven Top (root inedible); For trial: Topper, All Top.

Other greens:

Mustard: Florida Broadleaf (most popular), Southern Giant Curled. For trial: Tendergreen II (a hybrid), Tendergreen, Southern Giant Curled.

Collards: Blue Max, Georgia Southern, Heavi-Crop, Top Bunch, Vates. For trial: Morris Heading, Champion, Carolina, and hybrid: Hi Crop.

Tragopogon porrifolius and Scorzonera hispanica

Last revised February 15, 2010

Pisum sativum

Last revised February 12, 2010

 Apium graveolens

 Last revised February 1, 2010

Photo credit: Alex Stone, Oregon State University

VARIETIES (approximately 110-150 days from transplanting).

Early: Utah 52-70-R Improved.
Late: Florida 683. For trial: Clean Cut, Tall Green Light, Ventura.
Processing: Processor specifies varieties. Tall varieties are preferred. Some that have been used include: Tall Utah 52-75, Tall Utah 52-70R Improved, T.U. 52-70HK, Matador, Picador.

Cucumis sativus (slicing)

Last revised February 4, 2010

Slicing cucumber. Photo credit: Bill Mansour, Oregon State University

Cichorium endivia

Last revised February 10, 2010

Curled-leaf endive. Photo credit: Alex Stone, Oregon State University

VARIETIES (approximately 90 days)

Endive (curled, deeply cut, leaf types): Green-curled: Lorca, Ruffec (resists cold and wet conditions), Salad King. For trial: Large Green-curled White-ribbed, White Curled, Frisan, Wallonne Frisan (resistant to low temperatures), De Meaux, Crispy Green (heat resistant). 
"Baby" endive: Tosca. For trial: Galia.

Abelmoschus esculentus

Last revised February 12, 2010

Lycopersicon esculentum

Last revised February 15, 2010

Brassica napus (Napobrassica group) and Brassica rapa (Rapifera Group)

Last revised February 15, 2010

Turnips with high Potassium (left) and low Potassium (right). Photo credit: Bill Mansour, Oregon State University

VARIETIES (approximately 60-80 days).

Rutabaga

Pisum sativum

Last revised February 12, 2010

Peas in eastern Oregon are grown in the Blue Mountain area east of Pendleton to Milton-Freewater, mostly as dry-land production in rotation with wheat. More recently production has also been in the Hermiston area where soils may be more sandy and subject to wind erosion. Hermiston area production may be irrigated or non-irrigated.

Brassica oleracea (Gemmifera Group)

Last revised January 12, 2010

VARIETIES (approximately 100-180 days from transplanting).

See the Vegetable Variety Selection Resources page to find varieties that have been shown to perform well in the Pacific NW. 

IMPORTANT

Before planting this Crucifer crop, consider the following important factors:

Zea mays

Last revised February 3, 2010

Note: This file contains information specific to production of popcorn and ornamental corn. For more general information on the production of sweet corn, see the file Sweet Corn for Processing.
 

Helianthus tuberosus

Last modified January 4, 2010

Phaseolus lunatus

Last modified January 11, 2010

VARIETIES (approximately 80 to 100 days in lower Columbia Basin).


Very few lima beans are grown for fresh market in the Pacific Northwest. When grown for processing, varieties are specified by processor. Commercial lima bean production has generally been limited to east of the Cascade Mountains. Some varieties grown east of the Cascade Mountains are:

Phaseolus vulgaris

Last revised January 11, 2010.

Photo credit: Bill Mansour, Oregon State University

VARIETIES (snapbeans require approximately 60-75 days to harvest, depending on season, planting date and variety).

Fresh Market

December 1, 2009

Miller, S., A. Stone, and M. Mcgrath, 2009. Organic Late Blight Management 2009 Webinar by eOrganic. eOrganic webinar. Available at https://eorganic.org/node/4868

January 1, 2010

Andrews, N. and D. Sullivan, 2010. Estimating Plant-Available Nitrogen Contribution from Cover Crops. eOrganic webinar. Available at: https://eorganic.org/node/5167

December 1, 2010

Carpenter-Boggs, L., D. Granatstein, and D. Huggins, 2010.  Greenhouse Gases and Agriculture: Where does Organic Farming fit Webinar by eOrganic.  eOrganic webinar. Available at https://eorganic.org/node/5617

Curran, W., and M. Ryan, 2010.  Using cover crops to suppress weeds in Northeast US farming systems Webinar by eOrganic. eOrganic webinar. Available at https://eorganic.org/node/5620

November 1, 2010

Cavigelli, M., 2010.  Impact of Grain Farming Methods on Climate Change Webinar by eOrganic. Available at https://eorganic.org/node/5619

December 1, 2010

Grossman, J., 2010.  Assessing Nitrogen Contribution and Rhizobia Diversity Associated with Winter Legume Cover Crops in Organic Systems Webinar by eOrganic. Available at https://eorganic.org/node/5668

January 1, 2010

Riddle, J., 2010. ABCs of Organic Certification Webinar. eOrganic webinar. Available at https://eorganic.org/node/4876

January 1, 2010

Mohler, C., 2010. Planning for Flexibility in Effective Crop Rotations. eOrganic webinar. Available at: https://eorganic.org/node/5127

December 1, 2010

Snow, M. and C. White, 2010.  Using Winter Killed Cover Crops to Facilitate Organic No-till Planting of Early Spring Vegetables Webinar by eOrganic. Available at https://eorganic.org/node/5643

January 1, 2010

Wiswall, R., 2010. Planning Your Organic Farm for Profit Webinar by eOrganic. eOrganic webinar. Available at https://eorganic.org/node/5050

January 1, 2010

Maul, J., 2010. Cover Crop Selection. eOrganic webinar. Available at http://eorganic.org/node/5205

January 1, 2010

Coolong, T., 2010. High Tunnel Production and Low Cost Tunnel Construction Webinar from eOrganic. eOrganic webinar. Available at https://eorganic.org/node/4814

January 1, 2010

Francis, D., 2010. Grafting Tomatoes for Organic Open Field and High Tunnel Production Webinar by eOrganic. eOrganic webinar. Available at https://eorganic.org/node/4985

January 1, 2010

Riddle, J., 2010. Getting EQIPed: USDA Conservation Programs for Organic and Transitioning Farmers Webinar from eOrganic. eOrganic webinar. Available at https://eorganic.org/node/5040

December 31, 1999

Large field tests of the close row beet production system was tested with the cooperation of Mr. K. Zielinski and Norpac in 1998.

Objectives: