News and Events

Publications

December 1, 1994

Report to the Oregon Processed Vegetable Commission

John Luna
OSU Dept. of Horticulture

There is an increasing interest among Oregon vegetable producers in the use of cover crops to improve soil quality, provide biologically fixed nitrogen to reduce fertilizer inputs, and reduce ground water contamination. Because of the cost associated with cover crop establishment and spring incorporation ($25-40/acre), the ability to account for N contribution from the cover crop and reduce fertilizer inputs could help offset the cover crop costs.

Objectives:

August 30, 2014

this SLN registration is for management of black leg on Brassica seed crops

December 31, 2016

The resistance to white mold obtained so far in snap beans has been derived from NY 6020, which provides partial physiological resistance. Under light disease pressure, plants will show few if any symptoms, while under heavy pressure, the plants may show a moderate level of infection (whereas susceptible BBL types will be 100% molded). Cultivars with this form of resistance would not need any supplemental control with fungicides, whereas under heavy pressure, fungicides might be required, but at a reduced frequency or quantity. The objective of this study was to determine whether OR6771 would benefit from an integrated mold control approach that included fungicides typically used in snap production, Topsin M and Rovral tankmixed.

April 1, 1982

The Willamette Valley of western Oregon is well known for production of a wide range of quality vegetables. Commercial, large-scale production of warm-weather vegetables such as tomatoes and melons is possible but is limited by competition from more favorable growing areas. However, for the home gardener or small market gardener, production of almost any vegetable crop except tropicals is possible in the long, mild growing season of the Willamette Valley. Major limiting factors are late spring frosts, insufficient heat for some warm-weather crops, and low night temperatures.

December 1, 2011

Report to the Oregon Processed Vegetable Commission

Ed Peachey
OSU Dept. of Horticulture

George Clough
OSU Hermiston Ag Exp Station

Objectives:

  1. Determine sweet corn tolerance to HPPD herbicides combined with chloroacetamide herbicides such as Dual Magnum.
  2. Determine the potential of controlling nutsedge in sweet corn with HPPD herbicides incombination with other products.
  3. Evaluate strategies to improve flame weeding efficacy in high-residue systems.
December 31, 1998

Objectives:

The general objective of the processing component of this research is to support the green bean breeding program being carried out by Dr. Jim Myers in the Horticulture Department. The specific objectives are:

December 31, 1998

OBJECTIVES FOR 1998:

  • To evaluate effects of several winter cover crop systems, including fall seeded and overseeded triticale, fall-seeded triticale plus winter pea, and overseeded red clover on yield and quality of sweet corn at three rates of N. The cover crops followed broccoli fertilized with three rates of N in 1997.
  • To evaluate the effect of these cover crops and the N applied to broccoli in 1997 on the amount of nitrate leached below the root zone during the winter of 1997-98.

COOPERATORS:

Myers, J., 2009. Intellectual Property Protection: What Do I Need to Know When Growing and Breeding Organic Crops and Seed?. eOrganic article. Available at http://www.extension.org/article/18449.

February 1, 1985

The purpose of these trials was to evaluate varieties of cauliflower for summer harvest. The major desired quality is heat tolerance: the ability to withstand high temperatures without ricing and to maintain the high curd quality typical of autumn-harvested cauliflower. A second desired quality is long wrapper leaves for self-blanching.

December 1, 1987

Objectives:

  • Transfer disease resistance and other desirable traits from runner beans, tepary beans to common beans using interspecific hybridization.
  • To study the redifferentiation of plants from bean tissue cultures.
January 6, 2016

Oregon is the second largest producer of processed green beans, and cultivars are needed that are adapted to western Oregon. The types that have traditionally been used are the bush blue lake (BBL) green beans with high yields, excellent processing quality. On the other hand, then need improvement in plant architecture, disease resistance (especially to white mold), and are genetically isolated from other green beans. The primary objective of the OSU green bean breeding program is to develop high yielding and high quality BBL green beans with high levels of white mold resistance. In 2015, a yield and processing trial of 18 advanced lines was conducted. An additional commercial trial with 27 entries was also grown and evaluated. Seven advanced lines are undergoing intense scrutiny for release as the first partially white mold resistant lines commercially available.

December 1, 2011

Principal Investigator: Alex Stone, Dept. of Horticulture


Research technician: Mikio Miyazoe, Dept. of Horticulture

Introduction

The justification for this trial is similar to that for cauliflower, reported earlier. A sweet corn trial in 1992 indicated that source and placement of nitrogen fertilizer had little effect on yield or quality of sweet corn. Rates of nitrogen application greater than 60 pounds per acre resulted in accumulation of significant amounts of nitrate-N in the soil. The purpose of these trials was to confirm 1992 results and to determine if yield of sweet corn would be affected by source or timing of application of nitrogen fertilizer.

Methods

December 31, 1999

Large field tests of the close row beet production system was tested with the cooperation of Mr. K. Zielinski and Norpac in 1998.

Objectives:

This free online tool on the OSU Extension Service Small Farms website compares the nutrient value and cost of cover crops, organic and synthetic fertilizers and compost. Use this Excel Calculator to develop well balanced and cost effective nutrient management programs for your farm. Developed by Nick Andrews, Dan Sullivan, Jim Julian and Kristin Pool. OSU Extension Series # EM 8936-E

December 1, 2003

Report to the Oregon Processed Vegetable Commission

Dan McGrath
OSU Dept. of Horticulture

Objectives:

  1. Maintain, evaluate, and refine a regional pest monitoring network for selected Lepidopteran pests of broccoli and cauliflower, and other crops.
  2. Develop new strategies for detecting aphid outbreaks.
  3. Evaluate whether less aggressive spray programs are effective during periods of low insect pressure.
  4. Compare the effectiveness of aphid and looper pesticides at various levels of insect pressure.
January 1, 2000

Research report from OSU's North Willamette Research and Extension Center

Delbert Hemphill
OSU Dept of Horticulture, NWREC

John Selker
OSU Dept of Biological and Ecological Engineering

Richard Dick
OSU Dept of Crop and Soil Science

Introduction

Andrews, N. and B. Baker, 2009. Can I Use This Input on My Organic Farm?. eOrganic article. Available at http://www.extension.org/article/18321.

December 1, 1993

Report to the Oregon Processed Vegetable Commission

Jim Baggett and Jack Stang
OSU Dept of Horticulture

Objectives:

  1. Evaluate head quality, maturity time, and total yield of eight promising cauliflower varieties over a range of planting times; screen additional cauliflower varieties to identify those having suitable characteristics for processing
April 1, 1981

North Willamette Research and Extension Center (NWREC) report

Delbert Hemphill
OSU Dept. of Horticulture

Introduction

December 1, 1986

Report to the Oregon Processed Vegetable Commission

Jim Baggett
OSU Dept of Horticulture

Objectives:

December 31, 2002

Report to the Oregon Processed Vegetable Commission

Sam and Tom Sweeney
Country Heritage Farms

Objective:

  1. To find in row and row spacings that would increase yields and percentages of higher grade beets.
December 1, 1995

Report to the Oregon Processed Vegetable Commission

Jim Baggett
OSU Dept of Horticulture

Objectives:

December 1, 1987

Report to the Oregon Processed Vegetable Commission

Bill Braunworth
Garvin Crabtree
Phil Diener
Dan McGrath
OSU Dept. of Horticulture

Objectives:

December 31, 1997

Report to the Oregon Processed Vegetable Commission

Dan McGrath
OSU Dept of Horticulture

Objectives:

  1. To reduce bean mold scouting effort and increase the value of the information produced by the scouting effort.
  2. To validate that the modified scouting program produces an accurate assessment of risk of mold development.

From the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife

January 6, 2016

The goals of this project were to determine 1) if liming controls clubroot, 2) the pH that must be attained to achieve commercially viable levels of control, and 3) how best to lime (materials, timing, incorporation strategies) to achieve that pH. Research conducted in 2014 showed that liming clubroot infected soils to a pH ≥7.1 is an effective practice for reducing both the incidence and severity of clubroot. Liming does not kill the pathogen but rather prevents disease spores from infecting the plant. In 2015 the research was focused on the relationship between disease incidence and severity when pH <7.1,better understanding when to apply lime, and how to incorporate to maximize pH change.

Andrews, N. and B. Baker, 2009. Can I Use this Product for Disease Management on my Organic Farm?. eOrganic article. Available at http://www.extension.org/article/18360.

December 1, 1994

Report to the Oregon Processed Vegetable Commission

Jack Stang and Jim Baggett
OSU Dept of Horticulture

Objectives:

  1. Evaluate head quality, maturity time and total yield of promising cauliflower varieties in early and late plantings.
  2. Evaluate the response of Starbright Y to closer plant spacings; compare head yield and quality from multiple and once-over harvesting.
  3. Relate maturity times of selected cauliflower varieties to timing of curd initiation and time period between initiation and harvest.
December 31, 2002

Report to the Oregon Processed Vegetable Commission

George Clough, Philip Hamm, and Sarah Blatchford
OSU Hermiston Agricultrual Research and Extension Center

Lindsey du Toit
WSU Mt. Vernon Research and Extension Unit

Objectives:

December 1, 1987

Report to the Oregon Processed Vegetable Commission

Jim Baggett
OSU Dept of Horticulture

Objectives:

December 1, 2010

Report to the Oregon Processed Vegetable Commission

Amy Dreves
OSU Dept. of Crop and Soil Science

Robert McReynolds
NWREC

Dan McGrath
OSU Dept. of Hort

Ed Peachey
OSU Dept. of Hort

Objectives:

December 1, 1996

Report to the Oregon Processed Vegetable Commission

Jim Baggett
OSU Dept of Horticulture

Objectives:

December 1, 1992

Report to the Oregon Processed Vegetable Commission

Ray William
OSU Dept. of Horticulture

Objectives:

December 1, 2011

Report to the Oregon Processed Vegetable Commission

Jim Meyers
OSU Dept of Horticulture

Brian Yorgey
OSU Dept of Food Science and Technology

Objectives:

December 31, 2009

Report to the Oregon Processed Vegetable Commission

Cindy Ocamb
OSU Dept of Botany and Plant Pathology

Nathan Miller
Postdoctoral Research Assistant, BPP, OSU

David H. Gent
USDA-ARS, Corvallis

Robert B. McReynolds
OSU North Willamette Research & Ext. Center

Objectives:

  1. Evaluate ascospore detection of S. sclerotiorum using multiple Rotorod spore traps.
  2. Monitor environmental conditions within bean fields to begin model development of ascospore detection events.

Research report from OSU's North Willamette Agricultural Research and Extension Center

Delbert Hemphill
OSU Dept of Horticulture, NWREC

Introduction

Research report from OSU's North Willamette Agricultural Research and Extension Center

Delbert Hemphill
OSU Dept of Horticulture, NWREC

Introduction

December 1, 1992

Report to the Oregon Processed Vegetable Commission

Mary Powelson and Robin Ludy
OSU Dept of Botany and Plant Pathology