News and Events

Publications

February 13, 2024

In 2023, the Blossom-End Rot Toolkit project was initiated. The goal is to develop methods that farmers can use to profitably produce dry-farmed tomatoes while reducing the incidence of blossom-end rot (BER) and other physiological disorders like yellow shoulders, sunscalding, splitting, cracking, and internal whitening. The tools in the toolkit are as follows: 

April 25, 2022

On February 1st, 2022, a tomato grafting workshop was held at the Oak Creek Center for Urban Horticulture. The name of the workshop was The Principles of Tomato Grafting. The workshop was led by Cassandra Waterman and Matt Davis and featured a panel discussion with four Oregon farmers and tomato grafters.

February 26, 2024

Delivered at the 2024 Willamette Valley Vegetable Educational Program. Victoria Triolo and Hunter Walker from Wilbur Ellis presented on uses of insect biocontrols in integrated pest management and their research on applying them using a small UAS (drone).

Triolo and Walker - Incorporation of Beneficial Insect Releases in You IPM program.

February 26, 2024

Delivered at the 2024 Willamette Valley Vegetable Educational Program. Dr. María I. Zamora Re presented on using the WSU Irrigation Scheduler app to manage irrigation for each particular field and crop.

 

Zamora Re - Irrigation and Water Management in Vegetable Crops

February 26, 2024

Delivered at the 2024 Willamette Valley Vegetable Educational Program. Dr. Steve Fennimore from the University of California, Davis presented on innovations in precision weeding tools and their ability to reduce hand weeding costs.

Fennimore - Next Generation Precision Weeding Tools

February 26, 2024

Delivered at the 2024 Willamette Valley Vegetable Educational Program. Dr. Kristie Buckland presented on managing seedcorn maggot (Delia platura) by adjusting planting dates. Seedcorn maggot can cause stand loss in corn, beans, parsnips, and other crops.

Buckland - Seed Corn Maggot Management

February 26, 2024

Delivered at the 2024 Willamette Valley Vegetable Educational Program. Hannah Baker, a graduate student in Dr. Inga Zasada's USDA-ARS lab, presented on plant pathogenic nematodes and strategies for testing for and controlling them.

Baker - Those that Lurk Below the Surface: Nematodes and Their Control

February 26, 2024

Delivered at the 2024 Willamette Valley Vegetable Educational Program. Dr. Navneet Kaur presented on symphylan control, including identifying them, sampling for them, and choosing crop rotations to reduce their populations.

Kaur - The Creepy Crawlers Underground - Symphylan Control

February 26, 2024

Delivered at the 2024 Willamette Valley Vegetable Educational Program. Nick Andrews presented on factors to consider in choosing cover crops and the work of the Western Cover Crops Council to develop an online tool to assist farmers in cover crop selection. See the presentation for opportunities to get involved!

Andrews - Choosing Cover Crops for Your Vegetable Rotation

February 26, 2024

Below are links to the presentations from the 2024 Willamette Valley Vegetable Educational Program, held February 7 at the North Willamette Research and Education Center with sponsorship from Wilbur-Ellis. Check out what's new in vegetable production!

February 23, 2024

Delivered at the 2024 Willamette Valley Vegetable Educational Program. Dr. Ocamb discussed similarities and differences of Fusarium and Rhizoctonia, the high Fusarium pressure in the valley, and promising work with biocontrols to manage Fusarium.

Ocamb - Rhizoctonia and Fusarium Biocontrol Applications

March 13, 2023

Agenda and presenter slides from Spring 2023 Vegetable Grower Seminar (pdf files)

April 25, 2022

In 2022, the Oregon State University Dry Farming Project launched the Dry Farm Melon Production in Oregon project, funded by WSARE. Project activities included two years of variety trials, two years of grafting trials, one year of on-farm trials, a planting density trial (2023), and succession planting (2023). 

There are two common types of looper worms that infest crops in the Willamette Valley, the cabbage and the alfalfa loopers.This page provides some basic information about the pest and discusses management and controls methods. Detailed scouting and monitoring techniques are provided as well as a risk assessment for spray decisions.

March 31, 2014

Cabbage maggot is a root-boring pest affecting brassica crops. It can cause wilting and increased risk for plant pathogens.

Brassica oleracea (Italica Group)

Last revised January 12, 2010

Broccoli plant at Gathering Together Farm, Philomath, Oregon.  Photo credit: Alex Stone, Oregon State University

Broccoli, also known as Calabrese in England and much of Europe, is closely related to cauliflower, cabbage, brussels sprouts, and kohlrabi. There is considerable confusion in the scientific and lay literature regarding exact nomenclature. All these Brassicas will intercross readily and are classified in the same genus and species.

August 12, 2021

In July 2021, we welcomed growers and vegetable breeders to tour our quinoa variety trial including low-saponin varieties. This handout summarizes results from our 2019 quinoa variety trial and the layout of this year's trial.

December 24, 2014

It is difficult to find information on winter squash production and storage. This page aggregates resources relevant to Oregon winter squash growers.

 

Alex Stone is fixing broken links and adding new content in January 2021 - come back soon!

February 5, 2020

Slides from a presentation on how and why to use drip irrigation by Scott Lukas, of OSU's Hermiston Research and Extension Center. Presented January 29, 2020 at the Northwestern Vegetable & Berry Farmers Conference. Includes a case study on onions.

February 5, 2020

Resources from the Food and Drug Administration and Oregon Department of Agriculture to help growers comply with the FDA Food Safety Modernization Act (FSMA) Produce Safety Rules. Presented January 29, 2020 at the Northwestern Vegetable & Berry Farmers Conference

February 5, 2020

Slides from a presentation on insect pests and diseases observed on hemp by Scott Lukas of OSU's Hermiston Agricultural Reserach and Extension Center.

Brassica oleracea (Gemmifera Group)

Last revised January 12, 2010

VARIETIES (approximately 100-180 days from transplanting).

See the Vegetable Variety Selection Resources page to find varieties that have been shown to perform well in the Pacific NW. 

IMPORTANT

Before planting this Crucifer crop, consider the following important factors:

Zea mays

Last revised February 3, 2010

Note: This file contains information specific to production of popcorn and ornamental corn. For more general information on the production of sweet corn, see the file Sweet Corn for Processing.
 

Cucumis sativus (slicing)

Last revised February 4, 2010

Slicing cucumber. Photo credit: Bill Mansour, Oregon State University

Cichorium endivia

Last revised February 10, 2010

Curled-leaf endive. Photo credit: Alex Stone, Oregon State University

VARIETIES (approximately 90 days)

Endive (curled, deeply cut, leaf types): Green-curled: Lorca, Ruffec (resists cold and wet conditions), Salad King. For trial: Large Green-curled White-ribbed, White Curled, Frisan, Wallonne Frisan (resistant to low temperatures), De Meaux, Crispy Green (heat resistant). 
"Baby" endive: Tosca. For trial: Galia.

Abelmoschus esculentus

Last revised February 12, 2010

Lycopersicon esculentum

Last revised February 15, 2010

Brassica napus (Napobrassica group) and Brassica rapa (Rapifera Group)

Last revised February 15, 2010

Turnips with high Potassium (left) and low Potassium (right). Photo credit: Bill Mansour, Oregon State University

VARIETIES (approximately 60-80 days).

Rutabaga

Pisum sativum

Last revised February 12, 2010

Peas in eastern Oregon are grown in the Blue Mountain area east of Pendleton to Milton-Freewater, mostly as dry-land production in rotation with wheat. More recently production has also been in the Hermiston area where soils may be more sandy and subject to wind erosion. Hermiston area production may be irrigated or non-irrigated.

Brassica oleracea (Capitata Group)

Last revised January,14 2010

Photo credit: Alex Stone, Oregon State University

Cucumis sativus (greenhouse)

Last revised February 3, 2010

Greenhouse cucumber. Photo credit: Bill Mansour, Oregon State University

Cucumis sativus (pickling)

Last revised February 3, 2010

Note: This file contains information specific to pickling cucumbers. For more detail on cucumber cultural methods, including fertilizers, pollination, and pest control, see Slicing Cucumbers.
Many excellent cucumbers are available. Flowers may be monoecious (separate male and female flowers on the same plant) and gynoecious (plants with only female flowers) and predominantly female (PF) types.

Armoracia rusticana

Last revised February 11, 2010

Allium cepa

Last revised February 12, 2010

Lycopersicon esculentum

Last revised February 15, 2010

Rheum rhabarbarum

Last revised February 15, 2010

Rhubarb. Photo credit: Bill Mansour, Oregon State University

Cynara scolymus

Last modified December 12, 2012

Globe artichokes: Photo credit: Bill MansourOregon State University

The true artichoke, a member of the thistle family, is known to the trade as the globe artichoke. The edible bud is made up of a cone of short, thick-stemmed bracts. For additional production information see Artichoke Production in California (UC VRIC).

Chinese Cabbage and leafy greens, Brassica species

Last revised February 1, 2010

Beta vulgaris

Last revised February 10, 2010

Photo credit: Alex Stone, Oregon State University

Allium sativum

Last revised February 5, 2010

Photo credit: Alex Stone, Oregon State University

Brassica oleracea (Gongylodes Group)

Last revised February 11, 2010

VARIETIES (approximately 55-65 days).

Grand Duke, Kolibri F1 (purple), White Vienna. For trial: Gigante, Granlibakken, Purple Danube, Purple Vienna, Rapidstar, White Danube.

Kohlrabi. Photo credit: Bill Mansour, Oregon State University

Allium sativum (planting stock)

Last modified February 5, 2010

Note: The information in this file is specific to production of garlic for planting stock, as suggested for growers producing garlic for the dehydration industry. More information on garlic types, cultural practices, and pest control can be found in the file Garlic.

Ipomoea batatas

Last revised February 15, 2010

Sweetpotatoes. Photo credit: Bill Mansour, Oregon State University

Raphanus sativus

Last revised February 15, 2010

Photo credit: Bill Mansour, Oregon State University

Cynara cardunculus

 Last revised January 14, 2010

Cardoon is a perennial, closely related to globe artichoke. It is prized by people from the Mediterranean countries for its unique flavor. The young tender leaf mid-ribs and immature flower stalks are used. The plant hearts are sometimes blanched like celery stalks (maturing in September).

 Nitrogen Fertilizer Solutions Providing Ancillary Weed Control in Cole Crops

AN-20 o Ammonium thiosulfate

Allium fistulosum and Allium cepa

Last revised February 12, 2010

Green bunching onions: Photo credit: Alex Stone, Oregon State University

Note: This file contains only information specific to the production of green bunching onions. For more information on onion culture, see the file Dry Bulb Onions -- Western Oregon.

Herbs and Spices

Last revised February 11, 2010

Herb production may be for culinary purposes (food flavoring), for scents and fragrances (potpourris), for medicinal uses or others (dyes, dried floral arrangements etc). Herb producers often grow for all these markets, and some herbs may be used for all these purposes.
Some of the most popular culinary herbs grown commercially and by home gardeners and hobbyists are: basil, cilantro (coriander), chervil, dill, oregano, mint, parsley, rosemary, sage, tarragon and thyme.

Cucurbita pepo

Last revised February 12, 2010

Cichorium intybus

Last revised February 10, 2010

Red heading type radicchio. Photo credit: Alex Stone, Oregon State University

(See also file on Witloof chicory)

VARIETIES (approximately 80 days).

This group of leafy vegetables falls under the general name of chicory. Heading and non-heading types exist. The heading types may be green-leaf or red. Some red types turn red only with the onset of cool weather.