News and Events

Publications

December 1, 2004

Objective: Identify sweet corn hybrids released for the processing market for high and stable yields under heavy and light root rot pressure.

Jim Myers describes common problems in the garden

December 1, 1994

Report to the Oregon Processed Vegetable Commission

John Luna
OSU Dept. of Horticulture

There is an increasing interest among Oregon vegetable producers in the use of cover crops to improve soil quality, provide biologically fixed nitrogen to reduce fertilizer inputs, and reduce ground water contamination. Because of the cost associated with cover crop establishment and spring incorporation ($25-40/acre), the ability to account for N contribution from the cover crop and reduce fertilizer inputs could help offset the cover crop costs.

Objectives:

December 31, 2005

Objectives: 1. Breed Bush Blue Lake green bean varieties with high economic yield and improved plant architecture. 2. Improve pod characteristics including straightness, color, smoothness, texture, flavor and quality retention, and combine with delayed seed size development. 3. Incorporate white mold resistance and improve root rot tolerance. 4. Develop a molecular marker map to facilitate marker-assisted selection of desirable horticultural traits.

January 1, 2000

Research report from OSU's North Willamette Research and Extension Center

Delbert Hemphill
OSU Dept of Horticulture, NWREC

John Selker
OSU Dept of Biological and Ecological Engineering

Richard Dick
OSU Dept of Crop and Soil Science

Introduction

December 1, 2011

Report to the Oregon Processed Vegetable Commission

Ed Peachey
OSU Dept. of Horticulture

George Clough
OSU Hermiston Ag Exp Station

Objectives:

  1. Determine sweet corn tolerance to HPPD herbicides combined with chloroacetamide herbicides such as Dual Magnum.
  2. Determine the potential of controlling nutsedge in sweet corn with HPPD herbicides incombination with other products.
  3. Evaluate strategies to improve flame weeding efficacy in high-residue systems.
December 31, 1998

Objectives:

The general objective of the processing component of this research is to support the green bean breeding program being carried out by Dr. Jim Myers in the Horticulture Department. The specific objectives are:

December 31, 1998

OBJECTIVES FOR 1998:

  • To evaluate effects of several winter cover crop systems, including fall seeded and overseeded triticale, fall-seeded triticale plus winter pea, and overseeded red clover on yield and quality of sweet corn at three rates of N. The cover crops followed broccoli fertilized with three rates of N in 1997.
  • To evaluate the effect of these cover crops and the N applied to broccoli in 1997 on the amount of nitrate leached below the root zone during the winter of 1997-98.

COOPERATORS:

Myers, J., 2009. Intellectual Property Protection: What Do I Need to Know When Growing and Breeding Organic Crops and Seed?. eOrganic article. Available at http://www.extension.org/article/18449.

February 1, 1985

The purpose of these trials was to evaluate varieties of cauliflower for summer harvest. The major desired quality is heat tolerance: the ability to withstand high temperatures without ricing and to maintain the high curd quality typical of autumn-harvested cauliflower. A second desired quality is long wrapper leaves for self-blanching.

December 1, 1987

Objectives:

  • Transfer disease resistance and other desirable traits from runner beans, tepary beans to common beans using interspecific hybridization.
  • To study the redifferentiation of plants from bean tissue cultures.
April 1, 1982

The Willamette Valley of western Oregon is well known for production of a wide range of quality vegetables. Commercial, large-scale production of warm-weather vegetables such as tomatoes and melons is possible but is limited by competition from more favorable growing areas. However, for the home gardener or small market gardener, production of almost any vegetable crop except tropicals is possible in the long, mild growing season of the Willamette Valley. Major limiting factors are late spring frosts, insufficient heat for some warm-weather crops, and low night temperatures.

December 1, 1989

Report to the Oregon Processed Vegetable Commission

C. Shock and C. Burnett
OSU Agricultural Experiment Station

Cooperators:
Dale Wilson and Krishna Mohan, University of Idaho
Bob Trent, Crookham Company
Lee Schweitzer, Asgrow
Mark Hughes, Germains

Objectives: 

Introduction

The justification for this trial is similar to that for cauliflower, reported earlier. A sweet corn trial in 1992 indicated that source and placement of nitrogen fertilizer had little effect on yield or quality of sweet corn. Rates of nitrogen application greater than 60 pounds per acre resulted in accumulation of significant amounts of nitrate-N in the soil. The purpose of these trials was to confirm 1992 results and to determine if yield of sweet corn would be affected by source or timing of application of nitrogen fertilizer.

Methods

December 31, 1999

Large field tests of the close row beet production system was tested with the cooperation of Mr. K. Zielinski and Norpac in 1998.

Objectives:

This free online tool on the OSU Extension Service Small Farms website compares the nutrient value and cost of cover crops, organic and synthetic fertilizers and compost. Use this Excel Calculator to develop well balanced and cost effective nutrient management programs for your farm. Developed by Nick Andrews, Dan Sullivan, Jim Julian and Kristin Pool. OSU Extension Series # EM 8936-E

December 1, 2003

Report to the Oregon Processed Vegetable Commission

Dan McGrath
OSU Dept. of Horticulture

Objectives:

  1. Maintain, evaluate, and refine a regional pest monitoring network for selected Lepidopteran pests of broccoli and cauliflower, and other crops.
  2. Develop new strategies for detecting aphid outbreaks.
  3. Evaluate whether less aggressive spray programs are effective during periods of low insect pressure.
  4. Compare the effectiveness of aphid and looper pesticides at various levels of insect pressure.
December 1, 2011

Principal Investigator: Alex Stone, Dept. of Horticulture


Research technician: Mikio Miyazoe, Dept. of Horticulture

John Hart, N. Monsour, D. Hemphill, and H. Mack. Vine crops fertilization information for Oregon. OSU Extension Publication Series #FG 68-E

Revised January 1990. Reprinted January 2000, February 2001.

December 31, 2005

The objectives of this project were to evaluate the efficacy of common row crop herbicides for control of puncturevine, and determine the effect of post harvest weed management strategies on hairy nightshade seed development.

December 1, 1986

Report to the Oregon Processed Vegetable Commission

Mary Powelson and M. Nelson
OSU Dept of Botany and Plant Pathology

Objectives:

  1. To identify potential biological control agent(s) for grey mold and white mold of snap beans.
  2. To determine effective methods of applying biological control agent(s) to achieve maximum control of grey mold and white mold of snap beans.
  3. To evaluate efficacy of available fungicides for control of grey mold and white mold of snap beans.
December 1, 1993

Objectives:
In 1991, we noted that symphylan density was less under spring-planted Micah barley residue than other cereals, conventional tillage, and soil with no cereal residue. The objectives of this trial were to further evaluate the impact of several plant species on the density of symphylans in snap bean systems

Changes to the Roval label for application.

December 31, 2006

Objective 1: Evaluation of commercial sweet corn varieties and inbred germplasm in small plots for susceptibility to seed rot/damping-off as well as root, stalk, and crown rot.

Objective 2: Evaluation of microbial and chemical treatments for suppression of sweet corn seed rot/damping-off, root rot, and crown rot.

Objective 3: Cooperate with other sweet corn projects (cultivar screenings, irrigation studies, etc.) within and outside of OSU programs.

Twelve lines of cauliflower were direct-seeded on July 13, 1977, with the purpose of overwintering several European cultivars for spring harvest. In addition some other lines were included for comparison. Lines or varieties were as follows: M1, M2, M3, and M4 from Moran Seed Co., Snow Crown from Harris Seed Co., Armado April, Armado May, Armado Quick, Armado Tardo, June, and Markanta Walcherin from Elsoms Seeds Ltd., and Pinnacle from Asmer Seed Co. Plot size was 24 row feet containing about 25 plants.

Methods

Stone, A., M. Colley, and L. Brewer, 2009. Government Agencies and Regulations: Resources for Organic Seed Producers. eOrganic article. Available at http://www.extension.org/article/18334.

December 1, 1994

Report to the Oregon Processed Vegetable Commission

Ed Peachey and Garvin Crabtree
OSU Dept. of Horticulture

Objective:

December 31, 1999

For the past several years a "stalk rot" disease has been afflicting commercial sweet corn fields grown in the Willamette Valley. The disease seems to have a pathogenic basis, but the exact causal agent is unknown.
Eighteen hybrids with se or su endosperm were evaluated for resistance to root/crown rot. Ears were also evaluated for processing quality.

Objectives: Characterize su and se sweet corn hybrids for reaction to root/crown rot.

Cooperator: M. Powelson, Botany and Plant Pathology

December 1, 1992

Objectives: To determine the production and processing potential of new introductions of sweet corn.

2010 Pacific Northwest Weed Management Handbook
Copyright 2010 Oregon State University. Series# WEED
Revised annually by the Extension Services of Oregon State University, Washington State University, and the University of Idaho

To order the print publication, go to http://extension.oregonstate.edu/catalog/abstract.php?seriesno=WEED
 

December 1, 2004

Report to the Oregon Processed Vegetable Commission

Alex Stone
OSU Dept of Horticulture

Objective:

  1. To determine the relationship between cropping history, sweet corn root rot, and yield.
  2. Develop cultural strategies to reduce the severity of corn root rot and improve corn yield.
December 31, 2014

Enhanced efficiency fertilizer (EEF) technologies have the potential to improve the crop N use efficiency (NUE) as well as minimize negative environmental losses compared to conventional fertilizers. The EEF fertilizer products consist of urea plus additives (to inhibit N loss). The major pathways for N loss in our sweet corn cropping systems are 1) N leached below the root zone as water soluble nitrate-N (NO3-N), and 2) gaseous ammonia loss (NH3-N) to the atmosphere following a surface urea application.Field studies and a laboratory incubation study were conducted in 2014 to evaluate the potential for benefit from EEF products via reduced nitrate-N leaching. Three products were evaluated: ESN (polymer coated urea), SuperU (prilled urea containing both a urease and nitrification inhibitor), and Instinct (urea + nitrification inhibitor).

Principle investigator: Jessica Green (OSU Horticulture)

VegNet is a regional pest monitoring and reporting network serving the Oregon processed vegetable industry, managed by the OSU Extension Service, and funded by the Oregon Processed Vegetable Commission. In the early spring of 2012, thirty six insect monitoring stations were established on cooperating farms located strategically throughout the Willamette Basin and maintained during the growing season.

The goals of the VegNet Regional Pest Monitoring and Reporting System are:

January 1, 2003

Report to the Oregon Processed Vegetable Commission

Ed Peachey
OSU Dept. of Horticulture

December 1, 1996

PROJECT LEADERS: Mary L. Powelson, Robin Ludy and Virginia Heifer
Botany and Plant Pathology
Oregon State University
Corvallis, OR 97331-2902


COOPERATORS: Bill Mansour and Dan McGrath


OBJECTIVES: 1) Determine the distribution and severity of stalk rot of sweet corn in the Willamette Valley; 2) Determine which Fusarium species are most commonly associated with stalk rot; and 3) Conduct a crop history survey.

December 31, 1999

These results are consistent with research in 1996-98: imazamox could be used postemergence in snap beans at 0.024 lbs ai/A with little risk of yield reduction. Imazamox adequately controls pigweed, nightshade, and many grass weeds at this timing and rate. Future
research should focus on lower use rates, earlier timings, and interactions with Basagran, surfactants, and insecticides on both crop injury and weed control.

Objectives: