News and Events

Publications

December 1, 1988

Report to the Oregon Processed Vegetable Commission

Jim Baggett
OSU Dept of Horticulture

Objectives:

October 1, 2006

This publication explores possibilities for new crops in the Columbia Basin. Includes crops for oilseeds, food, forage, revegetation, and xeriscape plant nurseries. Crops are classified into three categories: grasses and cereal grains, broad-leafed herbs and forbs, and shrubs and trees. Includes index by common and scientific names.

December 31, 2001

Report to the Oregon Processed Vegetable Commission

Jim Meyers
OSU Dept of Horticulture

Brian Yorgey
OSU Dept of Food Science and Technology

Objectives:

December 1, 1988

Report to the Oregon Processed Vegetable Commission

Bill Braunworth
D. Curtis
Dan McGrath
Gavin Crabtree
OSU Dept. of Horticulture

Objectives:

  1. Obtain data on the weed control efficacy and crop safety of herbicides currently registered for usein carrots.
  2. Identify other herbicides not currently registered for use in carrots, which might serve as a substitute for Lorox.
  3. Obtain data which could be used toward the registration of suitable herbicides.
December 31, 2009

Report to the Oregon Processed Vegetable Commission

Jim Meyers
OSU Dept of Horticulture

Brian Yorgey
OSU Dept of Food Science and Technology

Objectives:

January 6, 2016

Processors need broccoli with better quality traits than what is available in cultivars developed for California and Mexico fresh markets. Farmers need to reduce labor costs of broccoli production by mechanizing harvest. Most contemporary commercially available cultivars are not suitable for either mechanical harvest or processing. The objective of the OSU broccoli breeding program is to develop broccoli varieties adapted to western Oregon with suitable quality and high yields. The program operates on a one year cycle where cuttings from the field are taken into the greenhouse in the fall where they are rooted and hand crossed and self-pollinated to produce seed for the next generation. Seed is harvested in May and June and used to plant trials for fall evaluation. In 2015, nine experimental hybrids were planted in a replicated yield trial, which also included two commercial check hybrids and a new exserted commercial hybrid from Seminis.

December 31, 2008

Report to the Oregon Processed Vegetable Commission

Cindy Ocamb
OSU Dept of Botany and Plant Pathology

Nathan Miller
Postdoctoral Research Assistant, BPP, OSU

David H. Gent
USDA-ARS, Corvallis

Robert B. McReynolds
OSU North Willamette Research & Ext. Center

Objective:

  1. Determine whether ascospores of S. sclerotiorum can be detected in experimental bean plantings by polymerase chain reaction (PCR).
August 1, 2005

Baumgartner, Jo Ann, Laura Smith, Reggie Knox, and John Davis. 2005. Biodiversity Conservation: An Organic Farmer's Guide. Wild Farm Alliance. Watsonville, California.

January 1, 2010

Jepsen, Sarina, Eric Mader, and Scott Hoffman Black. 2010. Bumble Bee Conservation: Protecting North America's Disappearing Pollinators. The Xerces Society. Portland, Oregon.

December 1, 1991

 Report to the Oregon Processed Vegetable Commission

Mary Powelson
OSU Dept of Botany and Plant Pathology

Objective:

  1. Determine cause of reduction in carrot productivity
April 1, 1981

Research report from OSU's North Willamette Agricultural Research and Extension Center

Delbert Hemphill and V. Van Volk
OSU Dept of Horticulture, NWREC

December 31, 2000

Report to the Oregon Processed Vegetable Commission

George Clough, Philip Hamm, and Mike Baune
OSU Hermiston Agricultrual Research and Extension Center

Lindsey du Toit
WSU Mt. Vernon Research and Extension Unit

Objectives:

January 1, 2003

Report to the Oregon Processed Vegetable Commission

Alex Stone
OSU Dept. of Horticulture

Objectives:

Determine-

  1. the root rot tolerance and yield potential of sweet corn varieties
  2. the relationship between rotational history and root rot potential
  3. the relationship between soil factors and root rot potential
  4. whether a cone tube bioassay can be used to screen fields for root rot potential
December 31, 2001

Report to the Oregon Processed Vegetable Commission

Mary Powelson
OSU Dept. of Botany and Plant Pathology

Jim Meyer
OSU Dept. of Horticulture

Cindy Ocamb
OSU Dept. of Botany and Plant Pathology

Ed Peachey
OSU Dept. of Horticulture

Alex Stone
OSU Dept. of Horticulture

Objective:

  1. Develop a bioassay for studying biotic and abiotic interactions in the root rot syndrome of sweet corn

 

December 1, 1989

Report to the Oregon Processed Vegetable Commission

Jim Baggett
OSU Dept of Horticulture

Objectives: 

August 1, 2011

The purpose of this guide is to provide Willamette Valley growers with an introduction to the wildlife diversity of the region, a primer on habitat management, and some suggested actions that can be taken by growers to benefit native wildlife living on agricultural landscapes. Given the extensive area of the Valley used for farming, even modest actions undertaken by individual growers can accumulate into a major contribution toward regional conservation goals.

December 31, 2000

Report to the Oregon Processed Vegetable Commission

Jim Meyers
OSU Dept of Horticulture

Objectives:

January 6, 2016

The goals of this project were to determine 1) if liming controls clubroot, 2) the pH that must be attained to achieve commercially viable levels of control, and 3) how best to lime (materials, timing, incorporation strategies) to achieve that pH. Research conducted in 2014 showed that liming clubroot infected soils to a pH ≥7.1 is an effective practice for reducing both the incidence and severity of clubroot. Liming does not kill the pathogen but rather prevents disease spores from infecting the plant. In 2015 the research was focused on the relationship between disease incidence and severity when pH <7.1,better understanding when to apply lime, and how to incorporate to maximize pH change.

February 1, 1985

Research report from OSU's North Willamette Agricultural Research and Extension Center

Delbert Hemphill
OSU Dept of Horticulture, NWREC

December 31, 2005

Report to the Oregon Processed Vegetable Commission

Jim Meyers
OSU Dept of Horticulture

Brian Yorgey
OSU Dept of Food Science and Technology

Objectives: 

January 1, 2014

Research report to the Oregon Processed Vegetable Commission

Cindy Ocamb
OSU Dept. of Botany and Plant Pathology

December 1, 1994

Objectives: Breed bush green beans for the western Oregon processing industry with:
 

  • Improved potential for high yields at favorable sieve sizes and dependability
  • Improved straightness, texture, and other quality factors
  • Develop easy picking and small pod strains of Blue Lake type
  • Resistance to white mold and root rot
December 31, 1998

 The cabbage maggot, Delia brassicae, is a chronic pest problem in Willamette Valley cauliflower. This report summarizes the second year of research to identify deficiencies in current practices and improve management of cabbage maggot. This study has investigated cabbage maggot life cycles, evaluated treatment practices and tested sampling techniques for making management decisions.

December 1, 1996

OBJECTIVES FOR 1996:

To evaluate effects of several winter cover crop systems, including fall-seeded and overseeded triticale, fall-seeded triticale plus winter pea, and overseeded red clover on yield and quality of sweet corn at three rates of N. The cover crops follow broccoli fertilized with three rates of N.

To evaluate the effect of these cover crops and the N applied to sweet corn on the amount of nitrate leached below the root zone.

To evaluate the effect of these cropping systems on the potential for herbicide degredation in the soil profile.

January 1, 2012

The Xerces Society. 2012. Farming with Pollinators: Increasing Profit and Reducing Risk. The Xerces Society. Portland, Oregon.

December 1, 2011

 Ed Peachey, Dan Sullivan, and John Hart
Departments of Horticulture and Crop and Soil Science, OSU

The EPA is making available for a 30-day public comment period a proposed regulatory decision to register Enlist Duo containing glyphosate and the choline salt of 2,4-D for use in controlling weeds in corn and soybeans genetically engineered (GE) to tolerate 2,4-D.

December 31, 2008

Report to the Oregon Processed Vegetable Commission

Jim Meyers
OSU Dept of Horticulture

Brian Yorgey
OSU Dept of Food Science and Technology

Objectives:

1. Develop broccoli varieties adapted to western Oregon with suitable quality, high yields, and disease resistance. Specific traits include:

January 10, 2016

This handout summarizes the results from clubroot resistant brassica (cabbage, broccoli, cauliflower, Napa cabbage, etc) variety trials conducted in 2015-16 on farms in the Willamette Valley of Oregon as well as in greenhouse screening trials.

Pool, K. and A. Stone, 2009. Construction of High Tunnels: Resources for Organic Farmers. eOrganic article. Available at http://www.extension.org/article/18369

December 31, 2000

The processed vegetable industry has struggled annually with EPA to secure the Ronilan label. EPA announced that the registration will be cancelled in September 30, 2005. There are a number of new fungicides that have not been evaluated for the control of either Botrytis or Sclerotina for snap beans in Oregon. The currently registered alternative fungicides to Ronilan; Benlate, Bravo, Topsin, and Royal, are all subject to review by the EPA under the guidelines set forth in the provisions of the 1996 Food Quality Protection Act.

Cooperators:

December 1, 2010

This report was generated for the Oregon Processed Vegetable Commission (OPVC)

December 1, 2010

Report to the Oregon Processed Vegetable Commission

Cindy Ocamb
OSU Dept of Botany and Plant Pathology

Nathan Miller
Postdoctoral Research Assistant, BPP, OSU

David H. Gent
USDA-ARS, Corvallis

Robert B. McReynolds
OSU North Willamette Research & Ext. Center

Jim Myers
OSU Dept. of Horticulture

Objectives:

April 1, 1986

The varieties Armado April and Armado Quick (Elsoms, Ltd.) were seeded in 2-inch pots in the greenhouse on August 1, August 16, and August 30, 1978, and were transplanted to the field on August 21, September 12, and September 26, respectively. Plots consisted of two 25-foot rows. Treatments were 1) 50 pounds N/acre as ammonium nitrate applied on December 22, 1978, and again on February 26, 1979, and 2) 100 pounds N on the same dates. Treatments were in randomized block design. Heads were harvested twice weekly from April 13 until May 9, 1979.

April 1, 1986

Overwintering varieties of cabbage are available, particularly from European seed companies. Variety trials were conducted in 1980 and 1981, with planting dates the same as for the cauliflower, but quality was low and disease incidence high. The hardiest varieties had pointed or conical heads which are not desired in the local markets.

From the Oregon Agricultural Experiment Station Special Report 769, April, 1986

April 1, 2009

This guide was prepared for fish and wildlife conservation practitioners so they can better understand the  Farm Bill and how it can be used in cooperation with the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA), landowners, and producers for the conservation of fish and wildlife habitat and other ecosystem services.

Gray, Randall. 2009. Field Guide to the 2008 Farm Bill for Fish and Wildlife Conservation. U.S. NABCI Committee and the Intermountain West Joint Venture. Washington D.C.

December 31, 1999

For bean production in the Willamette Valley, perhaps one of the most obvious objectives is resistance to white mold (Sclerotinia) since this pathogen is difficult to control using chemicals and no native resistance has been found in the common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris). It has been shown that the production of oxalic acid by the fungus Sclerotinia is the primary cause of pathogenicity. If the oxalic acid can be degraded rapidly by the plant, the symptom can be alleviated or the infection inhibited.

OBJECTIVES:

Bertha Armyworm can damage cabbage and broccoli crops in the Willamette Valley. This page provides some basic information about the pest and discusses management and controls methods. Detailed scouting and monitoring techniques are provided as well as a risk assessment for spray decisions.

February 1, 1985

Fertilizer trials with overwinter onions at the North Willamette Station have shown a strong onion yield response to application of lime and gypsum and, in one experiment, a higher yield with ammonium sulfate rather than ammonium nitrate as N source. The yield response to gypsum and ammonium sulfate indicates that when soil pH, P, K, and N are optimal, S may be the element most limiting to onion bulb development. The following trial was designed to investigate the effects of lime, gypsum, and form of N on spring-seeded onions.

Methods

December 1, 1986

Report to the Oregon Processed Vegetable Commission

Jim Baggett      
OSU Dept. of Horticulture

Objectives:

  1. Test carrot breeding lines developed in the U.S. Department of Agriculture carrot breeding program for resistance to the motley dwarf virus complex.

The Black Cutworm & Variegated Cutworm can be particularly damaging to corn and bean crops in the Willamette Valley if infestations are not detected early. This page provides some basic information about the pest and discusses management and controls methods. Detailed scouting and monitoring techniques are provided as well as a risk assessment for spray decisions.

December 31, 2001

The goal of the project was to verify the results obtained in 2000 field trials and to evaluate other fungicides for their effectiveness in controlling Bean Gray Mold (Botrytis cinerea) and Bean White Mold (Sclerotinia Sclerotiolum) using Ronilan as an industry standard.

December 31, 2000

Objectives:

  • Characterize su sweet corn hybrids for reaction to root/crown rot.

Cooperators:

  • M. Powelson, Botany and Plant Pathology, Oregon State University
  • C. Ocamb, Botany and Plant Pathology, Oregon State University
December 31, 2014

For the past 18 years, processed vegetable growers in the Willamette Valley, OR have had a vital partner in crop pest monitoring – Oregon State University’s VegNet. This regional pest monitoring program provides weekly activity reports for common broccoli, cauliflower, sweet corn, and snap bean pests. Data is published on www.oregonvegetables.com and is available as an email subscription newsletter. The main goal of the program is to provide an early warning to growers of potential outbreaks that may warrant increased field scouting and action.